Office of National AIDS Policy Blog

  • How Far We've Come: Gayle Smith on AIDS

    This week, the International AIDS Conference is being held in in Washington, D.C.  The Conference provides an opportunity for Administration officials to reflect on the effect that HIV/AIDS has had in their own lives, and how far we’ve come in the fight against the terrible disease. In the below video, Gayle Smith, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Development and Democracy for the National Security Staff, shares how HIV/AIDS has personally impacted her life:

     

  • Lifting Up All Women

    Ed. note: This first appeared in The Huffington Post

    This week, the United States is hosting the 19th International AIDS Conference. As we welcome 22,000 leaders, advocates and experts from around the world with the goal of ending HIV/AIDS, I thought it was important not to forget those living with HIV/AIDS here in our home town. Among the 1.1 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the United States, African Americans make up almost half of all cases, despite representing only 14% of the U.S. population. Women comprise 23% of new HIV infections in this country, and African American women make up nearly two-thirds of these cases. Here in D.C., we have one of the highest HIV rates in the country, with 2.7% of all D.C. residents living with HIV/AIDS, and women comprise 28% of the cases. Of the 4,000 women living with HIV in D.C., 92% are African American. Compared with men in D.C., women living with HIV are still more likely to be tested later in the course of their disease, and are less likely to be linked to care.

    On Saturday, R&B legend Alicia Keys and I joined the Kaiser Family Foundation and the National Black Women's HIV/AIDS Network for an inspirational meeting with a community gathering of courageous black women living with HIV/AIDS. Our goal was to lift their stories up to provide insight and guidance for our efforts to end HIV/AIDS here at home.

    For so many of us, our commitment to fighting AIDS comes from the heart. Every day, I carry with me the pain of watching the excruciating death of my sister-in-law, Julie, eighteen years ago. Julie went for months without being properly diagnosed because it simply never occurred to her doctor to check for HIV. By the time she was diagnosed, it was too late. Julie left behind a devastated husband and a five-year-old daughter, Tracy. Tracy, who is now all grown up, accompanied me on Saturday.

  • How Far We've Come: Valerie Jarrett on AIDS

    This week, the International AIDS Conference is being held in in Washington, D.C.  The Conference provides an opportunity for Administration officials to reflect on the effect that HIV/AIDS has had in their own lives, and how far we’ve come in the fight against the terrible disease. In the below video, Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to the President, shares how HIV/AIDS has personally impacted her life.

     

  • How Far We've Come: Tina Tchen on AIDS

    This week, the 2012 International AIDS Conference is being held in Washington, D.C.  The Conference provides an opportunity for Administration officials to reflect on the effect that HIV/AIDS has had in their own lives, and how far we’ve come in the fight against the terrible disease. In the below video, Tina Tchen, Chief of Staff to the First Lady, shares how HIV/AIDS has personally impacted her life.

  • How Far We've Come: Grant Colfax on AIDS

    This week, the 2012 International AIDS Conference is being held in Washington, D.C.  The Conference provides an opportunity for Administration officials to reflect on the effect that HIV/AIDS has had in their own lives, and how far we’ve come in the fight against the terrible disease. In the below video, Grant Colfax, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, shares how HIV/AIDS has personally impacted his life:

     

  • How Far We've Come: John Berry on AIDS

    This week, the 2012 International AIDS Conference is being held in Washington, D.C.  The Conference provides an opportunity for Administration officials to reflect on the effect that HIV/AIDS has had in their own lives, and how far we’ve come in the fight against the terrible disease. In the below video, John Berry, Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shares how HIV/AIDS has personally impacted his life: