Pressing for Peace in South Sudan

U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan

President Barack Obama meets with Amb. Donald Booth, U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan, and Amb. Susan D. Page. Ambassador to the Republic of South Sudan, in the Oval Office, January 24, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

On Friday, I joined Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Amb. Donald Booth, and U.S. Ambassador to South Sudan Susan Page in their meeting with President Obama in the Oval Office. It was a chance for him to thank them for their extraordinary service and many contributions as the United States continues to devote every effort to helping achieve lasting peace in South Sudan. It was also a chance to discuss next steps in resolving the crisis. The United States strongly supports full implementation of the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement signed this week in Addis Ababa, the immediate release of the eleven detainees, and the establishment of a political process that leads to a durable solution.

President Obama thanked Special Envoy Booth for his energetic support to the mediation led by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development.   The President also conveyed his gratitude to Ambassador Page for her leadership and  the invaluable work of US Embassy Juba.  The President underscored as well our strong support for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the importance of ensuring that it can carry out its mandate to protect civilians and support efforts to ensure accountability for atrocities and safe delivery of humanitarian assistance throughout South Sudan.

The United States remains deeply committed to the people of South Sudan and fully supportive of their aspirations for a more peaceful and prosperous future for their young country. 

Read the President’s statement on South Sudan here.

Related Topics: Human Rights, Foreign Policy
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