Read all posts tagged Technology

  • Inspiring Future Scientists & Engineers One Kid at a Time

    Andrea Hence Evans is Principal of KidGINEER, LLC, a creative and unique STEM enrichment program targeting students ages 5-10. The program features six week hands-on classes focusing on civil engineering, chemical engineering, biology, electrical engineering, robotics, math and computer science. KidGINEER’s hands-on format is designed to expose students to STEM in a fun environment, while getting them excited about potential careers in STEM.


  • Full S.T.E.A.M. ahead in Urban Science Education

    Christopher Emdin, Ph.D is an Associate Professor of Science Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he also serves as Director of Science Education at the Center for Health Equity and Urban Science Education. He is also a fellow at the W.E.B. DuBois Research Institute at Harvard University. In these roles, he prepares teachers for STEM classrooms, conducts research in urban science education, and coordinates both the Science Genius B.A.T.T.L.E.S. and the #HipHopEd social media movement.


  • Using STEM to Create the Future You Want to See

    Kevin Clark, Ph.D, serves as a professor and director of the Center for Digital Media Innovation and Diversity in the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. Dr. Clark’s recent activities have focused on the use of video game design to increase interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers; examining pathways and best practices for increasing diversity in STEM disciplines; and issues of diversity in the design and development of educational media products.


  • The White House Hosts Its First-Ever Student Film Festival

    The White House, in collaboration with the American Film Institute, hosts young filmmakers from across the country at the first-ever White House Student Film Festival.


  • Connecting Kids from Diverse Backgrounds to Tech Skills

    There is no better time than the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Week of Action Celebrating STEM and Black History Month to highlight the tremendous progress being made at organizations, schools, and companies across America to advance the growing “Tech Inclusion” movement—aimed at connecting students from diverse backgrounds to technology classes, skills, and careers.


  • We Love it When a Plan Comes Together…

    Federal agencies are currently hard at work developing revised Open Government Plans — blueprints that are published every two years, highlighting agency progress towards making their work more transparent, participatory, and collaborative, and outlining new open government commitments going forward.


  • Today: The First-Ever White House Student Film Festival

    A few months ago, the White House challenged students all across the country to create short films illustrating the importance of technology in the classroom. Here's what happened next.


  • Get Your Popcorn Ready! It's the First Ever White House Film Festival

    The White House is hosting the first-ever Student Film Festival, featuring the work of more than a dozen young filmmakers who created short films celebrating the role of technology in the classroom.


  • Welcoming Detroit’s New Chief Information Officer

    Today marks an important milestone for Detroit city government’s technological revitalization: it is the first day on the job for the City of Detroit’s first-ever cabinet-level Chief Information Officer, Beth Niblock. Beth, an accomplished and innovative leader, was a member of our municipal Tech Team. She brings to Detroit a wealth of valuable experience through the incredible work she did over the past decade in the same position for the City of Louisville, Kentucky.


  • Privacy Workshop to Explore "Big Data" Opportunities, Challenges

    Last month, the President asked Counselor John Podesta to lead a comprehensive review of how “big data” – data sets so massive, diverse, or complex, that conventional technologies cannot adequately capture, store, or analyze them – will affect how Americans live and work. Senior administration officials have since begun to look at the implications of collecting, analyzing, and using such data for privacy, the economy, and public policy.


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