National Substance Abuse Prevention Month

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About

In 2011, President Obama issued the first-ever Presidential Proclamation designating October as National Substance Abuse Prevention Month. The tradition will continue in 2013, as parents, youth, schools, businesses, and community leaders across the country join in this month long observance of the role that substance abuse prevention plays in promoting safe and healthy communities.
 
View the President's 2013 National Substance Abuse Prevention Month Proclamation here
 
View the National Substance Abuse Prevention Month save-the-date flyer here
 
The month provides an important opportunity to pay tribute to the tragic losses attributed to substance abuse. The video message from Director Kerlikowske below provides ONDCP's perspective on Prevention Month.
 

Why do we recognize National Substance Abuse Prevention Month?

Every day, far too many Americans are hurt by alcohol and drug abuse. From diminished achievement in our schools, to greater risks on our roads and in our communities, to the heartache of lives cut tragically short, the consequences of substance abuse are profound. Yet, we also know that they are preventable. This month, we pay tribute to all those working to prevent substance abuse in our communities, and rededicate ourselves to building a safer, drug-free America.
 
Preventing drug use before it begins—particularly among young people—is the most cost-effective way to reduce drug use and its consequences. In fact, recent research has concluded that every dollar invested in school-based substance use prevention programs has the potential to save up to $18 in costs related to substance use disorders.
 
The President’s plan promotes the expansion of national and community-based programs that reach young people in schools, on college campuses, and in the workplace with tailored information to help them make healthy decisions about their future.
 
The Administration’s drug policy reflects this understanding by emphasizing prevention and access to treatment over incarceration, pursuing “smart on crime” rather than “tough on crime” approaches to drug-related offenses, and providing support for early health interventions designed to break the cycle of drug use, crime, incarceration, and re-arrest.

Read last year's 2012 Presidential Proclamation designating October National Substance Abuse Prevention Month here. (PDF)