DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

National Nuclear Security Administration

Federal Funds

Office of the Administrator

(including transfer of funds)

For necessary expenses of the Office of the Administrator in the National Nuclear Security Administration, including official reception and representation expenses not to exceed $12,000, [$420,754,000] $448,267,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That $10,000,000 previously appropriated for cleanup efforts at Argonne National Lab shall be transferred to "Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup'': Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $13,000,000 shall be used for the projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Office of the Administrator (NNSA) Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0313-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.10 Office of the Administrator 402 432 448
00.20 Congressionally directed projects 23 13



10.00 Total new obligations 425 445 448

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 20 34
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 439 411 448



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 459 445 448
23.95 Total new obligations -425 -445 -448



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 34

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 439 421 448
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -10



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 439 411 448

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 118 138 143
73.10 Total new obligations 425 445 448
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -405 -440 -442



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 138 143 149

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 310 339 370
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 92 101 72
86.98 Outlays from mandatory balances 3



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 405 440 442

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 439 411 448
90.00 Outlays 405 440 442

Office of the Administrator.—This account provides the Federal salaries and other expenses of the Administrator's direct staff for Weapons Activities and Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Federal employees at the NNSA Service Center and site offices. The Office of the Administrator creates a well-managed, inclusive, responsive, and accountable organization through the strategic management of human capital, enhanced cost-effective utilization of information technology, and greater integration of budget and performance data. Program direction for Naval Reactors remains within that program's account, and program direction for Secure Transportation Asset remains in the Weapons Activities account.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0313-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 206 205 205
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 3 3 3
11.5 Other personnel compensation 11 11 11



11.9 Total personnel compensation 220 219 219
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 58 58 58
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 3 3 3
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 15 15 15
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 7 7
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 38 38 33
25.2 Other services 19 32 37
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 34 34 34
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 6 9 9
25.5 Research and development contracts 1 1 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2 2
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 27 27 30



99.9 Total new obligations 425 445 448

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0313-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,831 1,970 1,970

Naval Reactors

For Department of Energy expenses necessary for naval reactors activities to carry out the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition (by purchase, condemnation, construction, or otherwise) of real property, plant, and capital equipment, facilities, and facility expansion, [$945,133,000] $1,070,486,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0314-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.10 Naval reactors development 792 914 1,030
00.20 Naval reactors program direction 36 37 40



10.00 Total new obligations 828 951 1,070

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 5 6
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 828 945 1,070
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 1



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 834 951 1,070
23.95 Total new obligations -828 -951 -1,070



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 6

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 828 945 1,070

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 189 197 223
73.10 Total new obligations 828 951 1,070
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -819 -925 -1,072
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -1



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 197 223 221

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 633 803 910
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 186 122 162



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 819 925 1,072

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 828 945 1,070
90.00 Outlays 819 925 1,072

Naval Reactors.—This account funds all naval nuclear propulsion work. It begins with reactor technology development, continues through reactor operation, and ends with reactor plant disposal. The program ensures the safe and reliable operation of reactor plants in nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers (constituting 40 percent of the Navy's combatants), and fulfills the Navy's requirements for new nuclear propulsion plants that meet current and future national defense requirements.
Due to the crucial nature of nuclear reactor work, Naval Reactors is a centrally managed organization. Federal employees oversee and set policies/procedures for developing new reactor plants and operating existing nuclear plants and the facilities that support these plants.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0314-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 22 25 23
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 7 6 6
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
25.2 Other services 2 2 2
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 1 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 738 850 971
31.0 Equipment 14 32 32
32.0 Land and structures 37 32 32
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 824 951 1,070
99.5 Below reporting threshold 4



99.9 Total new obligations 828 951 1,070

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0314-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 206 215 217

Weapons Activities

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for atomic energy defense weapons activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, the purchase of not to exceed one ambulance and one aircraft; [$6,384,431,000] $7,008,835,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That $357,800,000 is provided to Stockpile Systems activities including $91,956,000 for the B61 Stockpile Systems activities: Provided further, That upon completion of the Nuclear Posture Review and confirmation of the requirement for the B61-12, the NNSA is authorized to reallocate an additional $15,000,000 within the Stockpile Systems activities to support the continuation of the B61-12 non-nuclear upgrade study, with notification to cognizant congressional committees within 15 days of the implementation of this action: Provided further, That no funds may be obligated or expended for B61-12 nuclear components without prior approval by the Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $3,000,000 shall be used for the projects specified under the heading "Congressionally Directed Weapons Activities Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0240-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Weapons Activities:
Campaigns:
00.21 Science campaign 316 295 365
00.22 Engineering campaign 125 150 142
00.23 Inertial confinement fusion ignition and high yield campaign 442 458 482
00.24 Advanced simulation and computing campaign 553 568 616
00.25 Readiness campaign 151 100 112



00.91 Subtotal, Campaigns 1,587 1,571 1,717
01.20 Directed stockpile work 1,593 1,566 1,899
01.30 Readiness in technical base and facilities 1,675 1,843 1,849
01.40 Secure transportation asset 215 235 248
01.50 Nuclear counterterrorism incident response 215 222 233
01.60 Facilities and infrastructure recapitalization program 146 94 94
01.70 Site stewardship 61 105
01.80 Environmental projects and operations 39
01.82 Safeguards and security 856 891 844
01.84 Science, technology & engineering capability 30 20
01.85 Congressionally directed projects 23 3



01.91 Subtotal, direct program activities 4,792 4,915 5,292



03.00 Subtotal, Weapons Activities 6,379 6,486 7,009
09.10 Reimbursable program 1,304 1,900 1,900



10.00 Total new obligations 7,683 8,386 8,909

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 47 102
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 7,738 8,284 8,909



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 7,785 8,386 8,909
23.95 Total new obligations -7,683 -8,386 -8,909



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 102

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 6,410 6,384 7,009
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 1,780 1,900 1,900
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -452



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 1,328 1,900 1,900



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 7,738 8,284 8,909

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2,825 2,971 2,625
73.10 Total new obligations 7,683 8,386 8,909
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -7,989 -8,732 -9,269
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 452



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 2,971 2,625 2,265

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 4,032 5,005 5,412
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 3,957 3,727 3,857



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 7,989 8,732 9,269

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -1,670 -1,810 -1,810
88.40 Non-Federal sources -110 -90 -90



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -1,780 -1,900 -1,900
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 452

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 6,410 6,384 7,009
90.00 Outlays 6,209 6,832 7,369

Programs funded within the Weapons Activities appropriation support the nation's current and future defense posture, and its attendant nationwide infrastructure of science, technology and engineering capabilities. Weapons Activities provides for the maintenance and refurbishment of nuclear weapons to sustain confidence in their safety, reliability, and performance; expansion of scientific, engineering, and manufacturing capabilities to enable certification of the enduring nuclear weapons stockpile; and manufacture of nuclear weapon components under a comprehensive test ban. Weapons Activities also provides for continued maintenance and investment in the Department's enterprise of nuclear stewardship to be more responsive and cost effective. The Department also supports the capability to return to underground testing, if so directed by the President. The major elements of the program include the following:

Campaigns.—Focuses on scientific, technical, and engineering efforts to develop and maintain critical capabilities and tools needed to support stockpile refurbishment and continued assessment and certification of the stockpile for the long-term in the absence of underground nuclear testing.

Directed Stockpile Work.—Encompasses all activities that directly support specific weapons in the stockpile. These activities include: maintenance and day-to-day care; planned refurbishment; reliability assessment; weapon dismantlement and disposal; and research, development, and certification technology efforts to meet stockpile requirements.

Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities.—Provides the underlying physical infrastructure and operational readiness for the Directed Stockpile Work and Campaign activities. These activities include ensuring that facilities are operational, safe, secure, and compliant with regulatory requirements, and that a defined level of readiness is sustained at facilities funded by the Office of Defense Programs.

Secure Transportation Asset.—Provides for the safe, secure movement of nuclear weapons, special nuclear material, and weapon components to meet projected DOE and DoD requirements. The Program Direction in this account provides for Federal agents and the transportation workforce.

Nuclear Counterterrorism Incident Response.—Formerly the Nuclear Weapons Incident Response, manages strategically placed people and equipment to provide a technically trained response to nuclear or radiological incidents worldwide, mitigates nuclear or radiological threats, and has a lead role in defending the Nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism.

Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization.—Continues its mission to restore the physical infrastructure of the national security enterprise. The program funding is utilized to address an integrated, prioritized series of repair and infrastructure projects focusing on elimination of legacy deferred maintenance that significantly increase the operational efficiency and effectiveness of the NNSA national security enterprise sites. The program is scheduled to conclude in 2013.

Site Stewardship.—Ensures environmentally compliant and energy efficient operations throughout the nuclear security enterprise, while modernizing, streamlining and sustaining the stewardship and vitality of the sites as they are transitioned within NNSA's plans for transformation of the national security enterprise.

Defense Nuclear Security.—Provides protection for NNSA personnel, facilities, and nuclear weapons and information from a full spectrum of threats, most notably terrorism. Provides for all safeguards and security requirements including protective forces and systems (except for personnel security investigations) at NNSA landlord sites, specifically the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Nevada Test Site, Kansas City Plant, Pantex Plant, Y-12 National Security Complex, and the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities.

Cyber Security.—Provides the requisite guidance needed to ensure that sufficient information technology and information management security safeguards are implemented throughout the NNSA enterprise. The vision of the NNSA Cyber Security Program is to transform the NNSA security posture by making strategic investments in people, operations, and technology.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0240-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 40 35 35
11.5 Other personnel compensation 15 14 14



11.9 Total personnel compensation 55 49 49
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 21 21 21
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 5 5 5
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 36 45 45
25.2 Other services 311 270 270
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 1 12 12
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 5,052 4,851 5,374
25.5 Research and development contracts 78 80 80
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 6 6 6
26.0 Supplies and materials 9 11 11
31.0 Equipment 185 271 271
32.0 Land and structures 566 807 807
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 52 55 55



99.0 Direct obligations 6,379 6,486 7,009
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1,304 1,900 1,900



99.9 Total new obligations 7,683 8,386 8,909

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0240-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 570 647 637

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for defense nuclear nonproliferation activities, in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of not to exceed one passenger motor vehicle for replacement only, [$2,136,709,000] $2,687,167,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $250,000 shall be used for the projects specified under the heading "Congressionally Directed Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0309-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.10 Nonproliferation and verification research and development 357 317 352
00.20 Elimination of weapons-grade plutonium production 94 83
00.30 Nonproliferation and international security 149 187 156
00.40 International Nuclear materials protection and cooperation (INMP&C) 456 572 590
00.50 U.S. surplus fissile materials disposition 41 701 917
00.70 Russian surplus fissile materials disposition 1 113
00.80 Global threat reduction initiative 393 334 559
00.85 Congressionally directed projects 3



01.00 Subtotal, obligaations by program activity 1,493 2,195 2,687
International Contributions:
09.12 INMP&C contributions 5
09.13 GTRI contributions 10



09.19 Subtotal, International contributions 15



10.00 Total new obligations 1,508 2,195 2,687

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 21 58
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 1,544 2,137 2,687
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 1



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 1,566 2,195 2,687
23.95 Total new obligations -1,508 -2,195 -2,687



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 58

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 1,537 2,137 2,687
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -8



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 1,529 2,137 2,687
58.00 Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) 15



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 1,544 2,137 2,687

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 1,699 1,517 1,471
73.10 Total new obligations 1,508 2,195 2,687
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -1,689 -2,241 -2,396
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -1



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 1,517 1,471 1,762

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 593 1,176 1,478
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,096 1,065 918



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 1,689 2,241 2,396

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.45 Offsetting collections (cash) from: Offsetting governmental collections (from non-Federal sources) -15

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 1,529 2,137 2,687
90.00 Outlays 1,674 2,241 2,396

The mission of this program is to: 1) prevent the spread of materials, technology, and expertise relating to weapons of mass destruction (WMD); 2) advance the technologies to detect the proliferation of WMD worldwide; 3) and eliminate or secure inventories of surplus materials and infrastructure usable for nuclear weapons. The program addresses the danger that hostile nations or terrorist groups may acquire WMD or weapons-usable material, dual-use production technology or WMD expertise. The major elements of the program include the following:

Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development (R&D).—This element of the program reduces the threat to national security posed by nuclear weapons proliferation/detonation or the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials through the long-term development of new and novel technology including treaty monitoring and verification capabilities. Using the unique facilities and scientific skills of NNSA and Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and plants, in partnership with industry and academia, the R&D program conducts research and development that supports nonproliferation mission requirements to close technology gaps identified through close interaction with NNSA and other U.S. Government agencies. It meets unique challenges and plays an important role in the Federal Government by developing new technologies applicable to nonproliferation, homeland security, and national security needs.

Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS).—The NIS mission is to prevent and counter the proliferation of WMD, including materials, technologies, and expertise, by states and non-state actors. The program provides policy and technical support for nonproliferation and associated treaties and agreements, domestic and international legal and regulatory controls, and diplomatic and counter-proliferation initiatives, and through cooperation with international organizations and foreign partners on export controls, safeguards, and security. The program makes vital contributions to strengthen international security and the nuclear nonproliferation regime in four main areas: (1) Nuclear Safeguards; (2) Nuclear Controls; (3) Nuclear Verification/Transparency; and (4) Nonproliferation Policy. The NIS program safeguards nuclear material to ensure it is not diverted for non-peaceful uses, controls the spread of WMD material, technology and expertise, and verifies nuclear reductions and programs.

International Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation (INMP&C).— The INMP&C program supports one of the Administration's top priorities to lead a global effort to secure all nuclear weapons materials at vulnerable sites within four years — the most effective way to prevent terrorists from acquiring a nuclear bomb. INMP&C prevents nuclear terrorism by working in Russia and other regions of concern to 1) secure and eliminate vulnerable nuclear weapons and weapons exploitable materials, and 2) install detection equipment at international crossing points and Megaports to prevent and detect the illicit transfer of nuclear material. The program continues to improve the security of nuclear material and nuclear warheads in Russia and other countries of proliferation concern by installing Material, Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) upgrades and providing sustainability support to sites with previously installed MPC&A upgrades. Reducing the potential for diversion of nuclear warheads and nuclear materials has been a critical priority for the United States. The United States, through DOE/NNSA's Second Line of Defense Program, will continue to work with international partners to enhance their capabilities to detect, deter, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials, including the screening of containerized cargo at strategic international seaports.

Elimination of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Production (EWGPP).—Enhances nuclear nonproliferation by assisting Russia in ceasing its production of weapons-grade plutonium by providing replacement heat and electricity production capacity. This will result in the shutdown of the world's last three plutonium producing reactors, two of which have already been shut down in Seversk, and eliminate the production of 1.2 metric tons of plutonium per year. This program is scheduled to be completed in 2010 with the completion of the Zheleznogorsk portion of the program.

Fissile Materials Disposition.—The program goal is to eliminate the surplus Russian weapons-grade plutonium and surplus United States (U.S.) weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium. These disposition activities are concrete steps towards the Administration's vision of a world without nuclear weapons and are consistent with Administration international nonproliferation and arms control obligations. The program focuses U.S. efforts to downblend surplus U.S. highly enriched uranium and to implement the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement between the United States and Russia, which commits both countries to dispose of no less than 34 metric tons of surplus weapons-grade plutonium—enough for 8,000 nuclear weapons.

Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI).—The GTRI mission is to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. GTRI directly supports the Administration's goal to secure all vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, as well as objectives defined at the Moscow Summit in July 2009 concerning material removal and conversion of research reactors.

GTRI supports the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Security Goal by preventing terrorists from acquiring nuclear and radiological materials that could be used in weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other acts of terrorism by: 1) Converting research reactors and isotope production facilities from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU); 2) Removing and disposing of excess nuclear and radiological materials; and, 3) Protecting high-priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage. These three key aspects of GTRI—convert, remove, and protect—together provide a comprehensive approach to achieving its mission and denying terrorists access to nuclear and radiological materials.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0309-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 3 3 26
25.2 Other services 336 336 196
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 5 5 2
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1,065 1,145 1,757
25.5 Research and development contracts 15 12 12
31.0 Equipment 44 48 48
32.0 Land and structures 22 634 634
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 3 12 12



99.0 Direct obligations 1,493 2,195 2,687
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 15



99.9 Total new obligations 1,508 2,195 2,687

Cerro Grande Fire Activities

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0312-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 10 3
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -7 -3



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 3

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 7 3

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays 7 3

Cerro Grande Fire Activities.—Emergency funding was provided in 2000 and 2001 for restoration activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico after the Cerro Grande Fire in May 2000.

Environmental and Other Defense Activities

Federal Funds

Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

Defense Environmental Cleanup

(including transfer of funds)

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for atomic energy defense environmental cleanup activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of not to exceed [four] two ambulances and [three passenger motor vehicles] one fire truck for replacement only, [$5,642,331,000] $5,563,039,000, to remain available until expended, of which [$463,000,000] $496,700,000 shall be transferred to the "Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund''[: Provided, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $4,000,000 shall be used for projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Defense Environmental Cleanup Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0251-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Closure Sites 65 41 6
00.02 Hanford Site 2,600 995 969
00.03 River Protection - Tank Farm 646 408 418
00.04 River Protection - Waste Treatment Plant 690 690 740
00.05 Idaho 942 466 407
00.06 NNSA Sites 615 298 281
00.07 Oak Ridge 777 223 177
00.08 Savannah River 2,838 1,210 1,218
00.09 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 404 230 221
00.10 Program Support 34 34 27
00.11 Safeguards & Security 266 279 250
00.12 Technology Development & Demonstration 30 20 34
00.13 Program Direction 329 362 335
00.14 UE D&D Fund Contribution 463 463 497
00.15 Congressionally Directed Activities 18 4



10.00 Total new obligations 10,717 5,723 5,580

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 31 102 26
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 10,783 5,642 5,563
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 5 5 5



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 10,819 5,749 5,594
23.95 Total new obligations -10,717 -5,723 -5,580



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 102 26 14

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 10,784 5,642 5,563
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -1



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 10,783 5,642 5,563

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 1,915 6,623 5,169
73.10 Total new obligations 10,717 5,723 5,580
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -6,004 -7,172 -7,552
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -5 -5 -5



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 6,623 5,169 3,192

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 4,414 4,088 4,043
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,590 3,084 3,509



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 6,004 7,172 7,552

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 10,783 5,642 5,563
90.00 Outlays 6,004 7,172 7,552

The Defense Environmental Cleanup program is responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing waste at sites where the Department carried out defense-related nuclear research and production activities that resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination requiring remediation, stabilization, or some other type of cleanup action. The budget displays the cleanup program by site.

Closure Sites.—Funds post-closure administration costs after physical completion.

Hanford Site.—Funds the Hanford site cleanup and environmental restoration to protect the Columbia River. The Hanford site cleanup is managed by two Environmental Management (EM) site offices: the Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection.
The Hanford site (Richland) is responsible for cleanup of most of the geographic area on the Hanford site, and its projects are displayed in two new accounts: projects that focus on Central Plateau remediation and projects to be completed within the River Corridor and other cleanup operations. These new accounts are proposed in the 2011 Budget to better align activities at the Hanford site with the way the work is completed and eliminates the previous accounts of 2012 Accelerated Completions and 2035 Accelerated Completions. The primary cleanup focus is the safe storage, treatment and disposal of Hanford's legacy wastes and environmental restoration. Risk to the public, workers, and the environment will be reduced by removing contamination before it migrates to the Columbia River.
The Office of River Protection at the Hanford site is responsible for the storage, retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of tank waste and the operation, maintenance, engineering, and construction activities in the 200 Area Tank Farms. Its budget has two components, the operation and maintenance of radioactive liquid waste tank farms and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant.

Idaho.—Funds the Idaho Cleanup Project, which is aimed at reducing the risk of contamination reaching the Snake River Plain Aquifer from nuclear and hazardous waste buried or stored on-site. It also funds efforts to eliminate infrastructure costs by aggressively conducting cleanup operations to reduce the site "footprint"; stabilize legacy spent nuclear fuel through 2012; and treat and dispose of the sodium bearing tank wastes, close tank farms, perform initial tank soils remediation work, and prepare the stored high-level waste calcine for final disposition.

NNSA Sites.—Funds the safe and efficient cleanup of the environmental legacy at National Nuclear Security Administration sites including Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Site, and the Separations Process Research Unit. The cleanup strategy is a risk-based approach that focuses first on those contaminant plumes and sources that are the greatest contributors to risk. The overall goal is first to ensure that risks to the public and workers are controlled, then to clean up soil and groundwater using a risk-based methodology. NNSA is responsible for long-term stewardship of its sites after physical cleanup is completed.

Oak Ridge.—Funds defense-related cleanup of the three facilities that make up the Oak Ridge Reservation: the East Tennessee Technology Park, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Y-12 Plant. The overall cleanup strategy is based on surface water considerations, encompassing five distinct watersheds that feed the Clinch River. Cleanup actions will contain that waste; improve on-site surface water quality to meet required standards; and protect off-site users of the Clinch River.

Savannah River Site.—Funds the safe stabilization, treatment, and disposition of legacy nuclear materials, spent nuclear fuel, and waste at the Savannah River site. The cleanup funding is displayed in two new accounts: projects that are associated with risk management and projects that focus on cleanup and waste disposition, which includes nuclear material stabilization, radioactive tank waste, and the Defense Waste Processing Facility operations. These new accounts are proposed in the 2011 Budget to better align activities at the Savannah River site with the way the work is completed and eliminates the previous accounts of Nuclear Material Stabilization and Disposition, 2035 Accelerated Completions, and Tank Farm Activities. The Savannah River cleanup strategy has four primary objectives: 1) eliminate the highest risks first through safe stabilization, treatment, and disposition of EM-owned nuclear materials, spent nuclear fuel, and waste; 2) significantly reduce costs of continuing operations and surveillance and maintenance; 3) decommission all EM-owned facilities; and 4) remediate groundwater and contaminated soils, using an area closure approach.

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.—Funds the world's first permitted deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste, and the Nation's only disposal site for defense-generated transuranic waste. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, managed by the Carlsbad Field Office, is an operating facility, supporting the cleanup of transuranic waste from waste generator and storage sites. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is crucial to DOE completing its cleanup and closure mission.

Program Direction.—Funds the Federal workforce responsible for the overall direction and administrative support of the EM program, including both Headquarters and field personnel.

Program Support.—Funds EM Headquarters policy and oversight activities. This includes management and direction for various crosscutting EM and Department of Energy initiatives; establishment and implementation of national and departmental policy; and analyses and integration activities across the Department of Energy complex in a consistent, responsible and efficient manner.

Safeguards and Security.—Funds activities to protect against unauthorized access, theft, diversion, loss of custody or destruction of Department of Energy assets and hostile acts that may cause adverse impacts on fundamental national security or the health and safety of Department of Energy and contractor employees, the public or the environment.

Technology Development and Deployment.—Funds projects to address the immediate, near- and long-term technology needs identified by the EM sites, enabling them to accelerate their cleanup schedules, treat orphaned wastes, improve worker safety, and provide technical foundations for the sites' end state visions.

Federal Contribution to the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund.—Funds the Federal Government's contribution to the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0251-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 167 175 181
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 2
11.5 Other personnel compensation 9 9 9



11.9 Total personnel compensation 178 186 192
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 48 49 49
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 2 2
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 9 11 9
22.0 Transportation of things 1 2 2
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 6 6 6
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 5 6 6
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 591 550 547
25.2 Other services 1,989 805 800
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 40 33 33
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 6,685 2,940 2,826
25.5 Research and development contracts 4 2 2
26.0 Supplies and materials 3 3 3
31.0 Equipment 80 50 25
32.0 Land and structures 996 996 996
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 82 82 82



99.9 Total new obligations 10,717 5,723 5,580

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0251-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,603 1,674 1,674

Defense Environmental Services

Other Defense Activities

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses, necessary for atomic energy defense, other defense activities, and classified activities, in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of not to exceed [12] 10 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, [$847,468,000] $866,317,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $3,000,000 shall be used for projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Other Defense Activities Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0243-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.10 Health, safety and security 448 453 464
00.20 Legacy management 188 201 189
00.30 Defense related administrative support 108 126 119
00.40 Mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility 487
00.50 Defense activities at INL 79 84 88
00.60 Hearings and Appeals 7 7 6
00.70 Congressionally directed projects 3
00.80 Acquisition Workforce Improvement 12



01.00 Subtotal, Direct program activities 1,317 874 878
09.10 Reimbursable program 1,500 2,500 2,500



09.19 Subtotal, Reimbursable program 1,500 2,500 2,500



10.00 Total new obligations 2,817 3,374 3,378

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 25 27
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 2,817 3,347 3,378
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 2



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 2,844 3,374 3,378
23.95 Total new obligations -2,817 -3,374 -3,378



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 27

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 827 847 878
40.00 Appropriation (Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility) 487



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 1,314 847 878
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 1,145 2,500 2,500
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 358



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 1,503 2,500 2,500



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 2,817 3,347 3,378

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 279 647 650
73.10 Total new obligations 2,817 3,374 3,378
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -2,089 -3,372 -3,393
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 1
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -2
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -358



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 647 650 635

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1,281 2,426 1,996
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 808 946 1,397



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 2,089 3,372 3,393

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -1,098 -2,500 -2,500
88.40 Non-Federal sources -47



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -1,145 -2,500 -2,500
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -358

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 1,314 847 878
90.00 Outlays 944 872 893

Health, Safety and Security.—The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) supports the Secretary's mission-related objectives by strengthening the Department's health, safety, environment, and security programs to enhance productivity while maintaining the highest standards of safe operation, protection of national assets, and environmental sustainability. HSS functions include: policy and guidance development and technical assistance; analysis of health, safety, environment, and security performance; domestic and international health studies; medical screening programs for former workers; employee compensation support; quality assurance programs; safety and security professional development and training; interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board; advanced security technologies deployment; national security information programs; security for the Department's facilities and personnel in the National Capital Area; independent oversight of security, cyber security, emergency management, environment, safety, and health performance; and worker safety, nuclear safety, and classified information security enforcement programs.

Office of Legacy Management.—The programs support long-term stewardship activities (e.g., groundwater monitoring, disposal cell maintenance, records management, and management of natural resources) at sites where active remediation has been completed. In addition, Legacy Management is responsible for the management and administration of pension and benefit continuity for contractor retirees at these sites.

All Other.—Obligations are included for defense-related administrative support, defense-related activities at Idaho National Laboratory, and the Office of Hearings and Appeals. The Office of Hearings and Appeals adjudicates personnel security cases, complaints of reprisals by contractor employees for "whistleblowing,'' and is the appeal authority in various other areas, including block grant appeals. The Office also decides requests for exception from DOE orders, rules, and regulations. Finally, the Office is responsible for the DOE civil rights functions, including the processing of EEO and Title VI/Title IX complaints, oversight of DOE financial assistance to prevent it from being used in a discriminatory way, as well as coordinating the employee concerns program activities performed by Federal officials.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0243-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 84 84 82
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 3 3 3
11.8 Special personal services payments 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 89 89 87
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 21 21 21
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 5 5 5
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 75 29 29
25.2 Other services 279 259 273
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 38 32 31
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 6
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 319 393 386
26.0 Supplies and materials 9 11 11
31.0 Equipment 2 2 2
32.0 Land and structures 468 3 3
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 5 29 29



99.0 Direct obligations 1,317 874 878
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1,500 2,500 2,500



99.9 Total new obligations 2,817 3,374 3,378

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0243-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 718 689 689

[Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal]

[For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the purposes of Public Law 97-425, as amended, including the acquisition of real property or facility construction or expansion, $98,400,000, to remain available until expended.] (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0244-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Repository Program 136 106



10.00 Total new obligations 136 106

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 1 8
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 143 98



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 144 106
23.95 Total new obligations -136 -106



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 8

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 143 98

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 20 27 14
73.10 Total new obligations 136 106
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -129 -119



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 27 14 14

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 112 98
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 17 21



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 129 119

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 143 98
90.00 Outlays 129 119

The Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation was established by the Congress as part of the 1993 Energy and Water Development Appropriation (Pub. L. No. 102-377), in lieu of payment from the Department of Energy (DOE) into the Nuclear Waste Fund for activities related to the disposal of defense high-level waste from DOE's atomic energy defense activities. The Administration has determined that developing a repository at Yucca Mountain is not a workable option and that the Nation needs a different solution for nuclear waste disposal. As a result, the Department will discontinue its application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a license to construct a high-level waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain in 2010 and establish a Blue Ribbon Commission to develop a new strategy for nuclear waste management and disposal. All funding for development of the Yucca Mountain facility will be eliminated, such as further land acquisition, transportation access, and additional engineering. Ongoing responsibilities under the Act, including administration of the Nuclear Waste Fund and the Standard Contract, will continue under the Office of Nuclear Energy, which will lead future waste management activities. Residual responsibilities for site remediation will be assumed by NNSA and the Office of Environmental Management.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0244-0-1-053 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
25.2 Other services(service contracts) 10 5
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 126 101



99.9 Total new obligations 136 106

Energy Programs

Federal Funds

Science

(including transfer of funds)

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for science activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and purchase of not more than [50] 57 passenger motor vehicles, 56 of which are for replacement only, including [one] two law enforcement vehicles, two ambulances, and [three] two buses, [$4,903,710,000] $5,121,437,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That $15,000,000 appropriated under this heading under prior appropriation Acts for the Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy is hereby transferred to the "Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy'' account: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $76,890,000 shall be used for the projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Science Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0222-0-1-251 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Basic Energy Sciences 2,056 1,669 1,835
00.02 Advanced Scientific Computing Research 493 421 426
00.03 Biological and Environmental Research 732 621 627
00.04 High Energy Physics 955 862 829
00.05 Nuclear Physics 641 548 562
00.06 Fusion Energy Sciences 468 444 380
00.07 Science Laboratories Infrastructure 342 132 126
00.08 Science Program Direction 190 198 214
00.09 Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists 14 34 35
00.10 Safeguards and Security 80 83 87
00.11 Small Business Innovation Research 143 51
00.12 Small Business Technology Transfer 16 6
00.13 Congressionally Directed Projects 90 81
00.14 ARPA-E 6 9



01.00 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal (running) 6,226 5,159 5,121
09.49 Reimbursable program 602 700 700



10.00 Total new obligations 6,828 5,859 5,821

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 19 254
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 7,059 5,595 5,821
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 4
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts 10 4



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 7,082 5,859 5,825
23.95 Total new obligations -6,828 -5,859 -5,821



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 254 4

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 6,373 4,904 5,121
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -4 -9
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 88



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 6,457 4,895 5,121
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 308 700 700
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 294



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 602 700 700



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 7,059 5,595 5,821

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2,601 4,701 4,107
73.10 Total new obligations 6,828 5,859 5,821
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -4,437 -6,472 -6,305
73.31 Obligated balance transferred to other accounts -2
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 7 21 25
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -4
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -294



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 4,701 4,107 3,648

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 2,264 3,566 3,698
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 2,173 2,906 2,607



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 4,437 6,472 6,305

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -91 -560 -560
88.40 Non-Federal sources -217 -140 -140



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -308 -700 -700
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -294

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 6,457 4,895 5,121
90.00 Outlays 4,129 5,772 5,605

High Energy Physics.—The high energy physics (HEP) program aims to understand how our universe works at its most fundamental level, by discovering the most elementary constituents of matter and energy, probing the interactions between them, and exploring the basic nature of space and time itself. The program encompasses both experimental and theoretical particle physics research and related advanced accelerator and detector technology research and development (R&D). The primary mode of experimental research involves the study of collisions of energetic particles using large particle accelerators or colliding beam facilities.
In addition to contributing to breakthrough scientific discoveries, HEP research also makes major contributions to accelerator technology and provides the expertise necessary for the expansion of such technology into medicine, industry, and homeland security, as well as materials, biology, and chemistry research using light sources. One notable recent example is the Linac Coherent Light Source, now operating at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: the concept and proof-of-principle for this state-of-the-art basic energy sciences facility grew out of particle accelerator technology developed for the HEP program.
The HEP budget request supports a world leadership program at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Funding is provided for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) research program, including support for software and computing, pre-operations and maintenance of the U.S. built systems that are part of the LHC detectors; and accelerator commissioning and accelerator physics studies using the LHC.
While the future trajectory of the worldwide HEP program has an emphasis on the energy frontier, the proposed long-range program will provide the U.S. with a balanced and diverse array of world-leading efforts, including new facilities to ensure continued U.S. leadership at the intensity and cosmic frontiers of exploration, such as intense particle beams to probe rare and subtle particle interactions, or ground and space-based observatories for understanding dark energy and dark matter.

Nuclear Physics.—The nuclear physics (NP) program provides new insights and advances knowledge on the evolution and structure of nuclear matter. The program focuses on three broad but highly related research frontiers: strong interactions among quarks and gluons (quantum chromodynamics) and how they assemble into the various forms of matter; the structure of atomic nuclei at their limits of existence and nuclear astrophysics to address the origin of the elements and the evolution of the cosmos; and development of a new Standard Model of fundamental interactions and understanding of its implications for the origin of matter and the properties of neutrinos and nuclei.
NP develops the scientific knowledge, technologies, and trained workforce needed to underpin DOE's applied missions and is inherently relevant to a broad suite of applications that are important to the Nation. The advancement of knowledge of nuclear matter and its properties is intertwined with nuclear power, nuclear medicine, national security, environmental and geological sciences, and isotope production.
The NP request continues support of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory to characterize new states of matter and phenomena that occur in hot, dense nuclear matter; the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to understand the substructure of the nucleon; and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System at Argonne National Laboratory for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. Construction continues on the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade project to double the electron beam energy at CEBAF, which will open the opportunity for new discoveries and an understanding of quark confinement. Engineering and design is initiated for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, which will enable a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos and the behavior, of neutron stars, and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science. The Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications program develops and produces commercial and research radioisotopes that are provided to medical institutions, universities, research organizations, and industry for a wide array of uses and applications.

Biological and Environmental Research.—This program funds research in global climate change, environmental science, and systems biology. In conjunction with the advanced scientific computing research program, an earth systems modeling activity is continued to accelerate progress in coupled atmosphere-ocean-land-sea ice development through use of enhanced computer simulation and modeling. Genomics science activities will develop the science, technology, and knowledge base to harness microbial and plant systems for cost effective renewable energy production, carbon sequestration, and environmental remediation. The budget continues support for Bioenergy Research Centers, where research focuses on developing the fundamental science underpinning biofuel production.

Basic Energy Sciences.—The basic energy sciences (BES) program supports fundamental research in material sciences, chemistry, geosciences, and aspects of biosciences to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. BES supports two innovative approaches to integrated research: Energy Frontier Research Centers and Energy Innovation Hubs. The Energy Frontier Research Centers support multi-year, multi-investigator scientific collaborations focused on overcoming hurdles in basic science that block transformational discoveries. The Energy Innovation Hubs establish larger, highly integrated teams working to solve priority technology challenges that span work from basic research to engineering development to commercialization readiness.
The BES program operates large national user research facilities: a complementary set of intense x-ray sources, neutron scattering centers, electron beam characterization capabilities, and research centers for nanoscale science. These facilities probe materials in space, time, and energy at resolutions that can interrogate the inner workings of matter to answer some of the most challenging grand science questions. The request includes continued support to maintain utilization of and provide instrumentation for these state-of-the-art national user facilities. Research areas that will benefit from the facilities funding include structural biology, materials science, superconductor technology, and biomedical research and technology development. The request also supports construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Fusion Energy Sciences.—The fusion energy sciences (FES) program works to expand the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperatures and densities and to develop the scientific foundations needed to develop a fusion energy source. This is accomplished by the study of the plasma state and its interactions with its surroundings. An essential element of the FES program is the invention of advanced measurement techniques to ascertain the properties of plasma and its surroundings at the level required to test, challenge, and advance theoretical models. This validation forms the foundation of computational tools used to understand and predict the behavior of natural and man-made plasmas systems, including burning plasmas for fusion energy.
The FES program is now moving into the burning plasma regime through its participation in ITER, an international fusion research facility under construction in Cadarache, France, which is designed to achieve and investigate the characteristics of a burning plasma. FES funds the U.S. contributions to the ITER Project in collaboration with the European Union (EU), Japan, Russia, Korea, China, and India. ITER is the next step toward eventually developing fusion as a commercially viable energy source. The U.S. input to ITER physics design and preparations for its scientific exploitation are being coordinated by the U.S. Burning Plasma Organization (USBPO), which is a FES community-wide activity leveraging ongoing research at major facilities and at universities. The FES program operates three major research facilities (DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and the National Spherical Torus Experiment) to develop a more complete understanding of the physics of magnetically confined plasma and to identify approaches that may improve the economical and environmental attractiveness of fusion power. The FES program also provides support for basic research in plasma science in partnership with the National Science Foundation, the study of high energy density laboratory plasmas through a joint program with the National Nuclear Security Administration, and investigation of the innovative plasma confinement concepts. Finally, the FES request continues to support theory, modeling, and advanced simulation using high performance computing and research on new diagnostic measurement techniques and enabling technologies to enhance the capability of FES research facilities.

Advanced Scientific Computing Research.—This program supports advanced computational research, applied mathematics, computer science, and networking. The program also supports the operation of large high performance computing and network facilities including leadership computing facilities at the Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Energy Sciences Network. The request includes research, integrated with other science programs, on application of computer simulation and modeling to science problems.

Science Laboratories Infrastructure.—The mission of this program is to support scientific and technological innovation at the Office of Science (SC) laboratories by funding mission-ready infrastructure and fostering safe, sustainable, and environmentally responsible operations. Paramount among these is the provision of the infrastructure necessary to ensure world leadership by the SC national laboratories in basic scientific research, now and in the future. The request continues funding for the Infrastructure Modernization Initiative that is ensuring the mission readiness of the laboratories.

Safeguards and Security.—The mission of this program is to support the conduct of Departmental research missions at SC laboratories by ensuring appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access, theft, diversion, loss of custody, destruction of DOE assets, hostile acts that may cause adverse impacts on fundamental science, national security, the health and safety of DOE and contractor employees, the public, and the environment. The request maintains levels of protection specific to each facility and provides funding for the following areas: protective forces, security systems, information security, cyber security, personnel security, material control and accountability, and program management.

Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists.—This program trains young scientists, engineers, and technicians in the scientifically and technically advanced environment of the SC national laboratories to meet the demand for a well-trained scientific and technical workforce, including the teachers who educate the workforce in areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The program also funds the DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship program.

Program Direction.—This program provides a highly skilled Federal workforce to develop and sustain world-class science programs that deliver the scientific discoveries and technological innovations needed to solve our nation's energy and environmental challenges and enable the U.S. to maintain its global competitiveness. The Office of Science workforce is responsible for overseeing taxpayer dollars for science program development; program and project execution and management; the administrative, business, and technical management of research grants and contracts; the oversight of 10 of the 17 DOE national laboratories; and providing public access to DOE's R&D results.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0222-0-1-251 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 104 107 118
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 6 6 6



11.9 Total personnel compensation 111 114 125
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 26 27 30
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 4 4 5
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 9 10 10
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 9 11 9
25.2 Other services 156 150 140
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 17 14 15
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 2,969 3,034 2,880
25.5 Research and development contracts 194 203 184
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2 2
31.0 Equipment 734 396 430
32.0 Land and structures 839 346 362
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1,155 846 927



99.0 Direct obligations 6,226 5,159 5,121
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 602 700 700



99.9 Total new obligations 6,828 5,859 5,821

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0222-0-1-251 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,008 1,077 1,135

Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund

For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities authorized by section 5012 of the America COMPETES Act (Pub. L. No. 110-69), $299,966,000, to remain available until expended.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0337-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 ARPA-E Projects 9 273
00.02 Program Direction 27



10.00 Total new obligations 9 300

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 9 300
23.95 Total new obligations -9 -300



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 300
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 9



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 9 300

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2
73.10 Total new obligations 9 300
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -9 -227
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 2



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 2 75

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 7 225
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 2 2



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 9 227

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 9 300
90.00 Outlays 9 227

The Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund provides funding to implement the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) within the Department of Energy, as established by the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (Pub. L. No. 110-69). The mission of ARPA-E is to overcome the long-term and high-risk technological barriers to the development of energy technologies.

ARPA-E will facilitate initiatives to enhance the economic security of the United States through the development of energy technologies that reduce energy imports, improve energy efficiency, and reduce energy-related emissions including greenhouse gases. ARPA-E will identify and promote revolutionary advances in the fundamental sciences, translating scientific discoveries and cutting edge inventions into technological innovations. It will also accelerate transformational technological advances in areas that industry by itself is not likely to undertake because of technical and financial uncertainty. The role of ARPA-E is not to duplicate DOE's basic research and applied programs, but to focus on novel early-stage energy research with possible technology applications.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0337-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 5
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 6
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 2
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1
23.2 Rental payments to others 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 9 16
25.5 Research and development contracts 273



99.9 Total new obligations 9 300

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0337-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 35

Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund, Recovery Act

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0336-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 ARPA-E Projects 3 375
00.02 Program Direction 11



10.00 Total new obligations 3 386

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 386
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 389



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 389 386
23.95 Total new obligations -3 -386



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 386

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 400
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -11



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 389

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2 258
73.10 Total new obligations 3 386
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -1 -130 -130



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 2 258 128

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 130 130



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 1 130 130

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 389
90.00 Outlays 1 130 130

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0336-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 2
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 6
25.2 Other services 2 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1
25.5 Research and development contracts 375



99.9 Total new obligations 3 386

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0336-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 1 15

Energy Supply and Conservation

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0224-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 59 46 8
22.00 New budget authority (gross) -27 -30
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 28 15
22.21 Unobligated balance transferred to other accounts -14 -23 -8



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 46 8



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 46 8

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 104 50
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -131 -80



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) -27 -30

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 653 377 155
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -368 -150
73.31 Obligated balance transferred to other accounts -11 -137 -155
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -28 -15
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 131 80



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 377 155

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 368 150

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -112 -54
88.40 Non-Federal sources 8 4



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -104 -50
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 131 80

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays 264 100

In 2008, Congress disaggregated Energy Supply and Conservation into several new program-oriented accounts and appropriated funding accordingly. All activities formerly funded under this account are funded in the new program-oriented accounts, including Nuclear Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

Nuclear Energy

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for nuclear energy activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of not more than [36 passenger motor vehicles, including one ambulance] 9 buses, all for replacement only, [$786,637,000] $824,052,000, to remain available until expended[: Provided, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $2,500,000 shall be used for projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Nuclear Energy Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0319-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.02 University Research 5 5
00.03 RE-ENERGYSE 5
00.11 NP2010 178 105
00.21 Nuclear Hydrogen 7
00.31 Generation IV 142 257
00.32 Reactor Concepts RD&D 195
00.41 Fuel Cycle R&D (formerly Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) 148 136 201
00.61 International Nuclear Energy Cooperation 3



00.91 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal 480 503 404
01.01 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies - Modeling & Simulation Hub 24
01.02 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies - Crosscutting 45
01.03 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies - Transformative Nuclear Concepts R&D 30



01.91 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies - Subtotal 99



01.92 Research & Development Programs - Subtotal 480 503 503
03.01 Radiological Facilities Management 65 72 67
04.01 Idaho Facilities Management 140 197 162
06.01 Program Direction 76 73 92
07.01 Congressionally Directed Projects 3 3
09.01 Reimbursable program 64 70 70



10.00 Total new obligations 828 918 894

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 16 61
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 870 857 894
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts 3



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 889 918 894
23.95 Total new obligations -828 -918 -894



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 61

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 792 787 824
40.00 Appropriation (Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility)
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -4



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 788 787 824
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 39 70 70
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 43



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 82 70 70



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 870 857 894

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 640 523 563
73.10 Total new obligations 828 918 894
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -905 -886 -937
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 3 8 20
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -43



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 523 563 540

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 315 424 441
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 590 462 496



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 905 886 937

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -22 -70 -70
88.40 Non-Federal sources -17



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -39 -70 -70
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -43

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 788 787 824
90.00 Outlays 866 816 867

The Office of Nuclear Energy funds a range of research and development activities as well as supports the Nation's nuclear facilities. The 2011 budget continues programmatic support for advanced reactor R&D activities; fuel cycle R&D dedicated to waste storage and management solutions; and the safe, environmentally compliant, and cost-effective operation of the Department's nuclear energy infrastructure vital to nuclear energy R&D activities. To better align program functions with strategic goals, the 2011 budget establishes the Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration program, which will support new and ongoing R&D and other activities focused on innovative small modular reactors, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and other advanced reactor concepts. A new Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies program is also established to enable support of R&D focused on a broad spectrum of nuclear energy issues that crosscut reactor types and fuel cycle issues, including fuels, materials, and modeling and simulation. This program will also support a new effort to fund cutting-edge nuclear technology R&D across the full spectrum of nuclear energy issues. The effort will encourage out-of-the-box thinking and inspire creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges. Preliminary design and engineering for a domestic capability to produce plutonium-238 for use in radioisotope power systems required for certain National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space missions and national security missions will be funded in 2011 as well. Notably, Safeguards and Security for Idaho National Laboratory is funded under the Other Defense Activities appropriation. In addition, the Office of Nuclear Energy will oversee ongoing responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, including administration of the Nuclear Waste Fund and the Standard Contract, and will lead future waste management activities.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0319-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 36 36 37
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 2 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 39 39 40
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 10 17 18
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 13 4 10
25.2 Other services 12 15 16
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 7 5 7
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 442 514 499
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 3 5
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 5 3
31.0 Equipment 10 7 7
32.0 Land and structures 10 20 20
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 216 217 197



99.0 Direct obligations 764 848 824
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 64 70 70



99.9 Total new obligations 828 918 894

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0319-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 366 384 424

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for electricity delivery and energy reliability activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, [$171,982,000] $185,930,000, to remain available until expended [: Provided, That, within the funding available funding the Secretary shall establish an independent national energy sector cyber security organization to institute research, development and deployment priorities, including policies and protocol to ensure the effective deployment of tested and validated technology and software controls to protect the bulk power electric grid and integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the electricity grid: Provided further, That within 60 days of enactment, the Secretary shall invite applications from qualified entities for the purpose of forming and governing a national energy sector cyber organization that have the knowledge and capacity to focus cyber security research and development and to identify and disseminate best practices; organize the collection, analysis and dissemination of infrastructure vulnerabilities and threats; work cooperatively with the Department of Energy and other Federal agencies to identify areas where Federal agencies with jurisdiction may best support efforts to enhance security of the bulk power electric grid: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $13,075,000 shall be used for projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0318-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.10 Research and development 78 141 144
00.20 Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration 6 6 6
00.30 Permitting, Siting, and Analysis 5 6 6
00.40 Program Direction 18 22 29
00.50 Congressionally Directed Activities 20 13



00.91 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal (1 level) 127 188 185
02.10 Recovery Act Projects 111 4,391
09.01 Reimbursable work 29 29



10.00 Total new obligations 238 4,608 214

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 4 4,405
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 4,636 201 214
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts 3 2



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 4,643 4,608 214
23.95 Total new obligations -238 -4,608 -214



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 4,405

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 4,637 172 185
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -7



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 4,630 172 185
58.00 Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) 6 29 29



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 4,636 201 214

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 85 211 4,417
73.10 Total new obligations 238 4,608 214
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -112 -410 -2,217
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 8 20



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 211 4,417 2,434

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 52 133 140
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 60 277 2,077



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 112 410 2,217

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -6 -4 -4
88.40 Non-Federal sources -25 -25



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -6 -29 -29

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 4,630 172 185
90.00 Outlays 106 381 2,188

The mission of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the Nation's energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. This effort is accomplished through research, development, demonstration and technology transfer; implementation of the electricity grid modernization requirements contained in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (including the congestion study and analysis of potential National Interest Electric Transmission corridors as authorized by Section 1221) and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; technical assistance and analytical support to States and regions for policies, market mechanisms, and activities that facilitate competitive, reliable, environmentally sensitive, and customer-friendly electric markets; authorization for electricity exports and Presidential permits for cross-border transmission lines; energy power systems analysis; and coordinating and carrying out DOE Lead Sector Specific Agency responsibilities for protecting the Nation's critical energy infrastructure. Partnerships to engage industry, utilities, States, other Federal programs and agencies, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders in OE's efforts to ensure a more secure, reliable, efficient, and affordable national electricity supply will continue to be a key element of the program.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0318-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 8 8 11
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 9 9 12
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 2 3 4
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 18 1 9
25.2 Other services 15 16 10
25.5 Research and development contracts 87 116 56
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 67 68 69
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 39 4,365 24



99.0 Direct obligations 238 4,579 185
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 29 29



99.9 Total new obligations 238 4,608 214

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0318-0-1-999 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 70 61 82
Reimbursable:
2001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 3 5

Legacy Management

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0320-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Legacy Management 1



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 1

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 1
23.95 Total new obligations -1

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 22 3 3
73.10 Total new obligations 1
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -20



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 3 3 3

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 20

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays 20

This program supports non-defense related long-term stewardship activities (e.g., groundwater monitoring, disposal cell maintenance, and management of natural resources) at sites where active remediation has been completed. In addition, Legacy Management is responsible for the management and administration of pension and benefit continuity for contractor retirees at these sites. These activities are funded within the Other Defense Activities appropriation beginning in 2009.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for energy efficiency and renewable energy activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, [$2,242,500,000] $2,355,473,000, to remain available until expended [: Provided, That funds provided under this heading in this and prior appropriation Acts are available for on-site and off-site improvements for the Ingress/Egress and Traffic Capacity Upgrades project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Provided further, That, of the $80,000,000 provided under the wind energy subaccount under Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, up to $8,000,000 may be competitively awarded to universities for turbine and equipment purchases for the purposes of studying turbine to turbine wake interaction, wind farm interaction, and wind energy efficiencies, provided that such equipment shall not be used for merchant power production: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $292,135,000 shall be used for the projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0321-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Hydrogen Technology 156 183 137
00.02 Biomass and Biorefinery Systems R&D 131 307 224
00.03 Solar Energy 167 234 302
00.04 Wind Energy 51 84 123
00.05 Geothermal Technology 42 46 55
00.06 Water Power 18 71 41
00.07 Vehicle Technologies 267 312 325
00.08 Building Technologies 138 201 231
00.09 Industrial Technologies 79 105 100
00.10 Federal Energy Management Program 23 33 42
00.11 Facilities & Infrastructure 76 63 57
00.12 Weatherization & Intergovernmental Activities 492 297 385
00.13 Program Direction & Support 146 188 287
00.14 Congressionally Directed Projects 88 437
00.15 RE-ENERGYSE 50



00.91 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal (1 level) 1,874 2,561 2,359
02.01 Hydrogen Recovery Act Projects 34 9
02.02 Biomass Recovery Act Projects 23 754
02.03 Solar Recovery Act Projects 60 56
02.04 Wind Recovery Act Projects 25 82
02.05 Geothermal Recovery Act Projects 18 375
02.06 Water Power Recovery Act Projects 32
02.07 Vehicle Technologies Recovery Act Projects 6 104
02.08 Buildings Recovery Act Projects 3 315
02.09 Industrial Technologies Recovery Act Projects 31 230
02.10 FEMP Recovery Act Projects 18 4
02.11 Facilities Recovery Act Projects 110 149
02.12 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants - Recovery Act 1,524 1,660
02.13 Weatherization Assistance Program - Recovery Act 4,748 227
02.14 State Energy Program - Recovery Act 3,072 12
02.15 Appliance Rebate Programs - Recovery Act 32 266
02.16 Battery Manufacturing - Recovery Act 169 1,821
02.17 Transportation Electrification - Recovery Act 142 256
02.18 Alternative Fueled Vehicles - Recovery Act 299
02.19 Program Direction & Support Recovery Act Projects 33 69
02.20 Weatherization Innovation 3



02.91 Direct Program by Activities - Recovery Act 10,048 6,723
09.10 Reimbursable program 148 329 284



10.00 Total new obligations 12,070 9,613 2,643

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 28 7,073
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 19,102 2,527 2,639
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 2 2
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts 11 11 4



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 19,143 9,613 2,643
23.95 Total new obligations -12,070 -9,613 -2,643



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 7,073

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 18,979 2,243 2,355
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -50



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 18,929 2,243 2,355
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 284 284 284
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -111



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 173 284 284



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 19,102 2,527 2,639

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 1,288 11,517 11,742
73.10 Total new obligations 12,070 9,613 2,643
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -1,950 -9,483 -9,749
73.31 Obligated balance transferred to other accounts -3
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 3 97 90
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -2 -2
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 111



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 11,517 11,742 4,726

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 942 1,293 1,344
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,008 8,190 8,405



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 1,950 9,483 9,749

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -218 -218 -218
88.40 Non-Federal sources -66 -66 -66



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -284 -284 -284
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 111

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 18,929 2,243 2,355
90.00 Outlays 1,666 9,199 9,465

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs undertake research, development, demonstration and deployment activities to advance technologies and related practices to help meet the growing global demand for clean, reliable, sustainable, and affordable energy services and to reduce energy consumption. EERE programs include:

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies.—This program aims to reduce petroleum use, greenhouse gas emissions, and criteria air pollutants, and to contribute to a more diverse and efficient energy infrastructure by enabling the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

Biomass.—This program funds research, development, and deployment to validate and assist in commercialization of integrated biorefinery technologies. The program's activities include the development of biomass conversion technologies to produce a variety of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. The program also develops environmentally sustainable, regionally available feedstock production systems to supply these conversion processes. The program's long-term goal is to enable industry to develop commercial biorefineries that can sustainably and economically convert lignocellulosic biomass and algae to fuels, chemicals, heat, and power. The program's near-term goal is to help make cellulosic ethanol cost competitive by 2012 using a wide array of regionally available biomass resources and biorefinery pathways.

Solar Energy.— The program's main objective is to achieve cost parity for solar electricity by 2015. To achieve this objective, the Photovoltaic subprogram collaborates with several industry-led consortia focusing on lowering costs through manufacturing and efficiency improvements. The Concentrating Solar Power subprogram is developing thermal storage and supporting systems research and optimization to provide baseload power on demand. Additionally, the Systems Integration and Market Transformation subprograms support cost goals by addressing grid integration issues and accelerating the deployment of solar through city outreach and workforce development efforts.

Wind Energy.—This program develops technology in partnership with industry to improve the reliability and affordability of land-based and offshore wind energy systems. The program also supports resource assessments, advanced modeling, as well as activities that help reduce barriers to electric grid interconnection and other issues related to technology acceptance in the market.

Water Power.—This program conducts research, development, validation testing and deployment of innovative water technologies to accelerate market penetration of cost-effective and environmentally responsible renewable power generation from water. Early priorities of this relatively new program include: cost and resource assessments of the suite of potential marine, hydrokinetic, and advanced hydropower technologies, and environmental studies.

Vehicle Technologies.—The program's R&D seeks technology breakthroughs that will enable the U.S. to greatly reduce highway transportation petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions. Program activities encompass a suite of technologies for hybrid, plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and advanced efficiency vehicles, including lightweight materials, electronic power controls and electric driven motors, and advanced energy storage devices. This program also supports research to improve the efficiency of advanced combustion engines, using fuels with formulations developed for advanced engines, and incorporating non-petroleum based fuels components. The program also funds community-based outreach via Clean Cities coalitions, competitive awards, and other activities to facilitate the market adoption of alternative fuels and highly efficient automotive technologies.

Building Technologies.—In partnership with the buildings industry, the program develops, promotes, and integrates energy technologies and practices to make buildings more efficient and affordable. The Building Technologies Program accelerates the availability of highly efficient building technologies and practices through research and development; increases the minimum efficiency of buildings and equipment through the promotion of model building efficiency codes and the promulgation of national lighting and appliance standards; and encourages the use of energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies and practices in residential and commercial buildings through activities such as the ENERGY STAR partnership with EPA, and the Builders Challenge.

Industrial Technologies.—The Industrial Technologies Program supports cost-shared R&D of technologies to reduce industry's energy intensity and carbon emissions. Market transformation and technology development and deployment activities are pursued to accelerate industry's adoption of clean energy technologies that increase energy productivity.

Federal Energy Management Program.—This program enables the Federal Government to meet the relevant energy, water, greenhouse gas, and transportation goals of existing legislation and Executive Orders by providing interagency coordination, technical expertise, training, financing resources and contracting support.

Facilities and Infrastructure.—In support of EERE's R&D mission, this activity provides funding for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for general plant projects, maintenance, upgrades, and the final installment of funding to complete the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF).

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Activities.—The Weatherization and Intergovernmental Activities program supports clean energy deployment in partnership with State, local, U.S. Territory, and Tribal governments. The State Energy Program provides technical and financial resources to States to help them address issues in utility, renewable energy, and building code policies. Funding also supports energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet local needs. The Tribal Energy Program supports feasibility assessments and development of implementation plans for clean energy projects on Tribal lands. The Weatherization Assistance Program lowers energy use and costs for low income families by supporting energy efficient home retrofits through state-managed networks of local weatherization providers. The 2011 Budget also continues support for the Innovations in Weatherization activity to demonstrate new ways to increase the number of homes weatherized in partnership with non-traditional weatherization providers.

RE-ENERGYSE.—This program is focused on accelerating the transition to a low-carbon economy by creating an energy-literate generation, educating future leaders in science, engineering, and technology; and building a highly skilled U.S. workforce to develop affordable, abundant, and clean energy.
The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act provided funds to EERE in 2009 both to expand and accelerate existing EERE activities — such as demonstrations of biorefineries and enhanced geothermal systems, weatherization of low-income homes, and increasing the availability and reliability of renewable energy systems — as well as for new activities including battery manufacturing, electrification of the transportation infrastructure, rebates for energy efficient appliances and energy efficiency and conservation block grants.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0321-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 54 68 101
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 2
11.5 Other personnel compensation 3 3 3



11.9 Total personnel compensation 59 73 106
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 14 25 35
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 3 6 8
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 122 122 59
25.2 Other services 60 60 21
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 18 18 8
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 789 3,422 500
25.5 Research and development contracts 505 2,448 979
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2
31.0 Equipment 80 80 25
32.0 Land and structures 140 140 45
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 10,128 2,886 572



99.0 Direct obligations 11,922 9,284 2,359
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 148 329 284



99.9 Total new obligations 12,070 9,613 2,643

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0321-0-1-270 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 536 549 852

Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for non-defense environmental cleanup activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, [$244,673,000] $225,163,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0315-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Closure Sites 1
00.02 Fast Flux Test Facility 11 8 4
00.03 Gaseous Diffusion Plants 81 102 99
00.04 Small Sites 427 169 64
00.05 West Valley Demonstration Project 139 58 58
00.06 Congressionally Directed Activities 4 1
00.07 Program Direction (ARRA) 1 1
09.01 Reimbursable program 39 60 61



10.00 Total new obligations 703 399 286

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 3 85 1
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 785 315 285



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 788 400 286
23.95 Total new obligations -703 -399 -286



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 85 1

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 New budget authority (gross), detail 745 245 225
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 10



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 745 255 225
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 39 60 60
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 1



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 40 60 60



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 785 315 285

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balances, start of year 168 460 399
73.10 Total new obligations 703 399 286
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -410 -461 -465
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 1
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -1



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 460 399 220

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays (gross), detail 254 239 218
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 156 222 247



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 410 461 465

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -4 -15 -15
88.40 Non-Federal sources -35 -45 -45



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -39 -60 -60
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -1

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 745 255 225
90.00 Outlays 371 401 405

The Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup program includes funds to manage and clean up sites used for civilian energy research, and non-defense related activities. Past activities related to nuclear energy research and development resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination that requires remediation, stabilization, or some other type of action. The budget displays the cleanup program by site.

West Valley Demonstration Project.—Funds waste disposition, building decontamination, removal of non-essential facilities in the near-term, and development of the Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement. West Valley Demonstration Project plans to achieve interim end state completion no later than 2012.

Gaseous Diffusion Plants.—Funds surveillance and maintenance of the former Uranium Program facilities and manages legacy polychlorinated biphenyl contamination. Also included are the operation of two depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert the depleted uranium hexafluoride into a more stable form for reuse or disposition.

Fast Flux Test Facility.—Funds the long-term surveillance and maintenance and eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, constructed and operated from the 1960s through 1980s.

Small Sites.—Funds cleanup, closure, and post-closure environmental activities at a number of geographic sites across the Nation, including Brookhaven National Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, Moab, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, as well as non-defense activities at Los Alamos and Idaho. Some sites are associated with other Department of Energy programs, particularly the Office of Science, and will have continuing missions after EM completes the cleanup. Others will transition to the Office of Legacy Management or private sector entities for post-closure activities.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0315-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1
25.2 Other services 436 269 176
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 18 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 176 35 25
32.0 Land and structures 33 34 24



99.0 Direct obligations 664 339 226
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 39 60 60



99.9 Total new obligations 703 399 286

Fossil Energy Research and Development

For necessary expenses in carrying out fossil energy research and development activities, under the authority of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91), including the acquisition of interest, including defeasible and equitable interests in any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition or expansion, and for conducting inquiries, technological investigations and research concerning the extraction, processing, use, and disposal of mineral substances without objectionable social and environmental costs (30 U.S.C. 3, 1602, and 1603), [$672,383,000] $586,583,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That for all programs funded under Fossil Energy appropriations in this Act or any other Act, the Secretary may vest fee title or other property interests acquired under projects in any entity, including the United States[: Provided further, That, of the amount appropriated in this paragraph, $36,850,000 shall be used for projects specified in the table that appears under the heading "Congressionally Directed Fossil Energy Projects'' in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on this Act]. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0213-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Clean coal power initiative 54 668
00.02 Futuregen 14 44
00.03 Innovations for existing plants 48 55 65
00.04 Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle 63 69 58
00.05 Advanced turbines 27 34 31
00.06 Carbon sequestration 146 162 145
00.07 Fuels 24 29 12
00.08 Fuel cells 56 54 50
00.09 Advanced research 30 31 48
00.10 Natural gas technologies 19 18
00.11 Petroleum - oil technology 5
00.12 Program direction - management 123 137 120
00.13 Program direction - NETL R&D 27 30 40
00.14 Plant and capital equipment 18 20 20
00.15 Cooperative research and development 5 5
00.16 Environmental restoration 10 10 11
00.17 Special recruitment program 1 1 1
00.18 Congressionally directed projects 38 43
00.20 Unconventinal fossil energy technologies 20



00.91 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal (1 level) 708 762 1,269
02.01 Industrial carbon capture and storage - Recovery Act 59 1,460
02.02 Carbon capature and storage R&D - Recovery Act 1,000
02.03 Clean coal power initiative - Recovery Act 50 750
02.04 Geologic sequestration site characterization - Recovery Act 49
02.05 Geologic sequestration training - Recovery Act 20
02.06 Program direction - Recovery Act 2 8



02.91 Direct Program by Activities - Subtotal (1 level) 111 3,287
09.01 Reimbursable program 3 20 20



10.00 Total new obligations 822 4,069 1,289

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 606 4,059 682
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 4,265 692 607
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 10



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 4,881 4,751 1,289
23.95 Total new obligations -822 -4,069 -1,289



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 4,059 682

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 4,127 672 587
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -15
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 149



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 4,261 672 587
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 3 20 20
58.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 1



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 4 20 20



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 4,265 692 607

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 802 1,062 4,020
73.10 Total new obligations 822 4,069 1,289
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -552 -1,112 -1,521
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from other accounts 1 1
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -10
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -1



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 1,062 4,020 3,788

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 372 277 243
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 180 835 1,278



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 552 1,112 1,521

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -15 -15
88.40 Non-Federal sources -3 -5 -5



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -3 -20 -20
Against gross budget authority only:
88.95 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -1

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 4,261 672 587
90.00 Outlays 549 1,092 1,501

The Fossil Energy Research and Development program supports high-priority, high-risk research that will improve the Nation's ability to use fossil energy resources cleanly and efficiently. The program funds research and development with academia, national laboratories, and the private sector to advance the technology base used to develop new products and processes. Fossil Energy R&D supports activities ranging from early concept research in universities and national laboratories to applied R&D and proof-of-concept projects with private-sector firms.

Research, Development & Demonstration.—Program activities focus on: 1) advanced coal-fueled power systems that support carbon capture and storage (CCS), including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, hydrogen turbine technology and fuel cells; 2) CO2 capture technology applicable to both new and existing fossil-fueled facilities; 3) CO2 storage, with emphasis on CO2 monitoring, verification and accounting; and 4) advanced research to bridge fundamental science and engineering development. The Department will continue to work with the private sector and academia to conduct and direct research toward overcoming critical challenges to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy power generation in the United States.

Program Direction and Management Support.—The program provides the funding for all headquarters and field personnel and overhead expenses in Fossil Energy R&D including research by Federal employees. In addition, it provides support for day-to-day project management functions. No funding is proposed for the Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Project Loan Guarantee program because existing balances are sufficient to address current project activity. Also included is the Import/Export Authorization program which will continue regulatory reviews and oversight of the transmission of natural gas across the U.S. borders.

Environmental Restoration.—DOE is managing the environmental cleanup of former and present Fossil Energy project sites. Activities include environmental protection, onsite cleanup, and cleanup at several former offsite research and development locations in Wyoming and Connecticut and environmental efforts at the National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, Pittsburgh and Albany sites.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0213-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 58 64 58
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 3 3 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 63 69 61
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 15 17 12
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 4 4 3
23.2 Rental payments to others 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 87 93 70
25.2 Other services 20 22 16
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 9 9 7
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 65 69 53
25.5 Research and development contracts 515 3,718 1,005
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 1 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 3 3 2
31.0 Equipment 19 20 15
32.0 Land and structures 14 20 20



99.0 Direct obligations 818 4,048 1,268
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 3 20 20
99.5 Below reporting threshold 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 822 4,069 1,289

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0213-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 602 708 680

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

For expenses necessary to carry out naval petroleum and oil shale reserve activities, [including the hire of passenger motor vehicles, $23,627,000] $23,614,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, unobligated funds remaining from prior years shall be available for all naval petroleum and oil shale reserve activities. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0219-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Production and Operations 12 19 14
00.02 Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Program Direction 10 12 10



10.00 Total new obligations 22 31 24

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 10 7
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 19 24 24



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 29 31 24
23.95 Total new obligations -22 -31 -24



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 7

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 19 24 24

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 17 17 26
73.10 Total new obligations 22 31 24
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -22 -22 -29



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 17 26 21

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 11 15 15
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 11 7 14



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 22 22 29

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 19 24 24
90.00 Outlays 22 22 29

Following the sale of the Naval Petroleum Reserve 1 (NPR-1) (Elk Hills) site mandated by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), the most significant post-sale activity is the environmental remediation under the Corrective Action Consent Agreement with the State of California Department of Toxic Substances Control (Docket HWCA P1-08/09-003) and finalizing activities to complete the transfer of certain sections of the Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR-2) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 120(h). Activities include settlement of ownership equity shares with the former unit partner, Chevron USA Inc.

The account also funds activities at the Naval Petroleum Reserve 3 in Wyoming (Teapot Dome field), a stripper well oil field that the Department is operating until it reaches its economic production limit. No funds in the account will be made available to subsidize oil and gas research and development activities at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0219-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 2 3 2
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 8 11 9
25.2 Other services 8 12 9
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1 2 1
31.0 Equipment 1 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 21 30 23
99.5 Below reporting threshold 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 22 31 24

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0219-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 20 28 28

Energy Conservation

In 2005, congressional budget subcommittees implemented a number of structural changes, including the unification of energy efficiency and renewable energy programs under a single subcommittee. Consequently, programs formerly funded under Energy Conservation were funded through the Energy Supply and Conservation account.

Strategic Petroleum Reserve

(including cancellation of funds)

For necessary expenses for Strategic Petroleum Reserve facility development and operations and program management activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), [$243,823,000] $138,861,000, to remain available until expended.

Of the funds appropriated in Public Law 110-161 under this heading for new site land acquisition activities, $14,493,000 are hereby permanently cancelled.

Of the funds appropriated in Public Law 110-329 under this heading for new site expansion activities, beyond land acquisition, $31,507,000 are hereby permanently cancelled.

Of the funds appropriated in Public Law 111-85 under this heading, $25,000,000 are hereby permanently cancelled.

For an additional amount for "Strategic Petroleum Reserve", $71,000,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0218-0-1-274 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 SPR Management 17 25 21
00.02 SPR Storage Facilities Development 176 205 189
00.03 Expansion 2



10.00 Total new obligations 195 230 210

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 26 57 71
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 226 244 139



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 252 301 210
23.95 Total new obligations -195 -230 -210



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 57 71

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 205 244 210
40.36 Unobligated balance permanently reduced -71
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 21



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 226 244 139

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 104 107 105
73.10 Total new obligations 195 230 210
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -192 -232 -204



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 107 105 111

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 97 134 115
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 95 98 89



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 192 232 204

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 226 244 139
90.00 Outlays 192 232 204

The object of this program is to reduce the vulnerability of the United States to energy supply disruptions by maintaining a crude oil stockpile capable of rapid deployment at the direction of the President. This program enables the President to meet the Nation's membership commitments within the International Energy Agency's coordinated energy emergency response plans and programs to deter intentional energy supply disruptions and to take effective, coordinated action should an energy supply disruption occur.

This account provides for ongoing storage site operations and maintenance activities, planning studies and activities, drawdown testing/readiness of the Reserve, and program administration. The 2011 budget continues to provide further insurance against oil supply disruptions that could harm the U.S. economy by pursuing a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program that is environmentally responsible and fully responsive to the needs of the Nation and the public. The 2011 Budget proposes to cancel prior year balances either provided for, or suggested for, new site expansion, and use these funds instead to partially fund SPR operations and maintenance activities. In 2011, DOE proposes to perform activities to integrate into operation a replacement cavern for an existing storage cavern at one SPR site that posed an environmental risk for continued use.

The key measure of program performance is expressed as capability to comply with Level 1 Technical and Performance Criteria. These criteria are specifically engineered performance and reliability standards applied to critical inventory storage, drawdown, and distribution systems required for drawing down and distributing crude oil inventory.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0218-0-1-274 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 13 15 10
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 3 3 3
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1 1
23.2 Rental payments to others 3 3 3
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 5 6 5
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services 56 60 54
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 113 141 133



99.9 Total new obligations 195 230 210

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0218-0-1-274 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 110 122 123

SPR Petroleum Account

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0233-0-1-274 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Petroleum Acquisition 551 19



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 551 19

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 591 19
22.00 New budget authority (gross) -21



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 570 19
23.95 Total new obligations -551 -19



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 19

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -21

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 25 23 42
73.10 Total new obligations 551 19
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -553



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 23 42 42

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 553

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority -21
90.00 Outlays 553

This account provides for the acquisition, transportation, and injection of petroleum into SPR, including U.S. Customs duties, terminal throughput charges, incremental drawdown costs, and other related miscellaneous costs. In 2009, a multi-year initiative to fill the SPR to its capacity of 727 million barrels was completed. This fill was achieved through a combination of placement of Department of the Interior Federal royalty oil into the SPR, and direct purchase of oil in 2009 using $551 million in sales receipts from the September 2005 emergency sale of SPR oil in response to Hurricane Katrina. The Petroleum Account also funds drawdown and sales operations of the Reserve.

Energy Information Administration

For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of the Energy Information Administration, [$110,595,000] $128,833,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0216-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Obligations by Program Activity 112 112 129



10.00 Total new obligations 112 112 129

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 2 1
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 111 111 129



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 113 112 129
23.95 Total new obligations -112 -112 -129



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 1

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Discretionary: 111 111 129

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Change in obligated balances 24 39 44
73.10 Total new obligations 112 112 129
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -97 -107 -123



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 39 44 50

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 74 78 90
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 23 29 33



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 97 107 123

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 111 111 129
90.00 Outlays 97 107 123

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. EIA conducts a comprehensive data collection program that covers the full spectrum of energy sources, end uses, and energy flows; generates short- and long-term domestic and international energy projections; and performs informative energy analyses. EIA disseminates its data products, analyses, reports, and services to customers and stakeholders primarily through its website. Priority areas include analysis of energy market behavior and the interrelationship of energy and financial markets, improved surveys of energy use in homes, commercial buildings, and manufacturing to provide more data for more states, upgrades to the National Energy Model, and continued implementation of improvements in data coverage, quality and integration.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0216-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 39 39 45
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 41 41 47
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 10 10 12
25.1 Consulting services - non-Government contracts 43 43 50
25.2 Other services - service contracts 1 1 1
25.3 Purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 7 7 8
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 3 3 3
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2 2
31.0 Equipment 5 5 6



99.9 Total new obligations 112 112 129

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0216-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 366 380 390

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

salaries and expenses

For necessary expenses of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to carry out the provisions of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and official reception and representation expenses not to exceed $3,000, [$298,000,000] $315,600,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, not to exceed [$298,000,000] $315,600,000 of revenues from fees and annual charges, and other services and collections in fiscal year [2010] 2011 shall be retained and used for necessary expenses in this account, and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That the sum herein appropriated from the general fund shall be reduced as revenues are received during fiscal year [2010] 2011 so as to result in a final fiscal year [2010] 2011 appropriation from the general fund estimated at not more than $0. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0212-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
09.01 Just and Reasonable Rates, Terms & Conditions 164 167 176
09.02 Infrastructure 118 131 140



09.99 Total reimbursable program 282 298 316



10.00 Total new obligations 282 298 316

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 16 8 8
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 273 298 316
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 1



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 290 306 324
23.95 Total new obligations -282 -298 -316



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 8 8 8

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
58.00 Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) 273 298 316

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 33 40 42
73.10 Total new obligations 282 298 316
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -274 -296 -315
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -1



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 40 42 43

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 228 269 285
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 46 27 30



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 274 296 315

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.45 Offsetting collections (cash) from: Offsetting governmental collections (from non-Federal sources) -273 -298 -316

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays 1 -2 -1

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) regulates and oversees key interstate aspects of the electric power, natural gas and oil pipeline and hydropower industries. The Commission assists consumers in obtaining reliable, efficient and sustainable energy services at a reasonable cost through appropriate regulatory and market means. Regulated businesses pay fees and charges sufficient to recover the Commission's full cost of operations.

Just and Reasonable Rates, Terms and Conditions.—One of the Commission's fundamental statutory responsibilities is to ensure that rates, terms and conditions for wholesale sales and transmission of electric energy and natural gas are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. The Commission uses a combination of regulatory and market means to achieve this goal, consistent with national policy and priorities.
The Commission approves cost-based, and where appropriate, market-based rates for the interstate transportation of natural gas and oil on jurisdictional pipelines, and for the interstate transmission and wholesale sales of electric energy. The Commission accepts tariff provisions, as appropriate, to allow natural gas and oil pipelines and public utilities to modify their services to meet their customers' needs.
The organized wholesale electric markets illustrate the Commission's use of regulatory and market means to ensure that rates are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. Improving the competitiveness of these markets is important in achieving that goal because competition encourages new entry by supply-side and demand-side resources, spurs innovation and deployment of new technologies, improves operating performance, and exerts downward pressure on costs. Notable benefits also stem from more broadly diversifying the fuels used to generate electricity.
The Commission will continue to pursue market reforms to allow all resources, including renewable energy resources, to compete in jurisdictional markets on a level playing field. These efforts could include amendments to market rules, the modification or creation of ancillary services and related policies, or the implementation of operational tools that support the reliable integration of renewable resources.
The Commission will continue its efforts to identify and eliminate barriers to participation by demand resources in organized wholesale electric markets. Demand response, for example, can provide competitive pressure to reduce wholesale electric prices, increase awareness of energy usage, provide for more efficient operation of markets, mitigate market power, enhance reliability, and, in combination with certain new technologies, support the use of renewable energy resources and distributed generation.
To facilitate demand response participation on a non-discriminatory basis, the Commission will identify and encourage the implementation of best practices for demand response in organized wholesale markets. The Commission will conduct informal outreach with industry representatives and, as appropriate, will consider initiating formal proceedings to reform existing market rules.
The provision of ancillary services is critical to the reliable operation of the interstate electric transmission grid. To build on earlier reforms, the Commission will consider instituting formal proceedings to determine whether the modification or creation of ancillary services is necessary to support the provision of transmission service on terms and conditions that are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential.
The development of RTOs and modified market structures was aimed at increasing the efficiency of wholesale electric market operations and increasing non-discriminatory access to the transmission grid. To measure the benefits of RTOs and ISOs, the Commission will develop appropriate operational and financial metrics. The Commission will also identify opportunities to enhance operational efficiency in jurisdictional markets by encouraging public utilities, particularly RTOs and ISOs, to deploy new modeling software and optimize their market operations.
The Commission recognizes the value of resolving proceedings filed by jurisdictional companies through consensual means and using alternate dispute resolution techniques in the energy markets it oversees. The Commission will build on its successful use of consensual resolution and apply these concepts to additional areas of the Commission's work to improve regulatory outcomes. The Commission will begin by identifying issues and proceedings that lend themselves to consensual resolution.
Oversight and enforcement are essential complements to the Commission's approach to ensure that rates, terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential.
The Commission will review internal compliance programs as part of its compliance audits, issue publicly available audit reports, and engage in formal and informal outreach efforts to promote effective compliance programs.
Audits are planned and prioritized using a risk-based approach in order to maximize the impact of the Commission's resources.
The Commission also uses its oversight authority to prevent the accumulation and exercise of market power by reviewing mergers and other corporate filings to ensure that mergers and consolidations will not harm the public interest.

Infrastructure.—The Commission plays an important role in the development of a strong energy infrastructure that operates efficiently, safely and reliably. One aspect of the Commission's role in energy infrastructure development stems from siting authority that includes licensing non-federal hydropower projects, certificating interstate natural gas pipelines and storage projects, authorizing liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities, and, in certain circumstances, permitting electric transmission lines.
Throughout all of these processes, the Commission's goal is to expedite application processing without compromising environmental responsibilities or public participation. The Commission encourages, and sometimes requires, project proponents to engage in early involvement of state and federal agencies, Indian tribes, affected landowners and the public.
The lack of adequate transmission facilities creates a significant barrier to trade between markets and among regions. To encourage greater investment in the Nation's transmission infrastructure, Congress directed the Commission to adopt rules making incentive rate treatments available for electric transmission infrastructure investments meeting certain criteria. The Commission has approved 30 proposals for incentive rate treatment of 58 projects to build over 10,700 miles of transmission lines, at a total cost of approximately $40.7 billion.
The Commission will support the deployment of smart grid applications by reviewing and adopting, as appropriate, standards and protocols developed through the process coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. In addition, the Commission will implement rate treatment policies that support investments in smart grid technologies in the interim period between development and approval of smart grid standards.
Although ownership of the interstate electric transmission grid is highly disaggregated, with more than 500 owners, the need for, and effect of, transmission expansions to meet both reliability and economic needs must be considered not only on a local basis, but also on a sub-regional and regional basis. The Commission therefore requires transmission providers to participate in an open and transparent regional transmission planning process that aims to improve the coordination of transmission planning among utilities. The Commission will assess best practices, including the potential for collaborative decision making, and adopt reforms as necessary to its transmission planning process requirements.
The Commission is responsible for the safety of LNG and non-federal hydropower facilities throughout the entire life cycle of a project: design review, construction and operation. To meet this mandate, FERC primarily relies on physical inspections of the facilities.
In 2011, the Commission will prepare a portfolio risk assessment of the Commission's dam inventory. By identifying high-risk dams through this process, the current safety status and the need for additional dam safety studies and investigations will be thoroughly evaluated. By using risk-informed decision making, the Commission will be able to focus its resources on those structures that pose the greatest risk.
The Commission also has an important role in maintaining the reliability of the electric transmission grid through its oversight of the bulk power system infrastructure and the Electric Reliability Organization (ERO). The ERO develops and enforces mandatory reliability standards, including cyber and physical security standards, subject to the Commission's oversight and approval.
The Reliability Standards development process requires the ERO to use an open and inclusive process that employs extensive negotiation, consultation and coordination among many stakeholders. Regional Entities may also develop regional Reliability Standards or regional modifications to a national Reliability Standard. In addition, the ERO may develop interpretations of approved standards, subject to Commission review. In all such cases, the Commission must either accept or remand these filings. The Commission may also, upon its own motion or upon complaint, order the ERO to submit a proposed reliability standard or a modification of an existing reliability standard that addresses a specific reliability matter. Once proposed standards are filed, it is important that the Commission respond in a timely manner so that mandatory and enforceable standards affecting reliability can be implemented timely.
The Commission will enforce compliance with the Reliability Standards primarily through its oversight of the ERO and Regional Entities. This will typically be accomplished by participating in selected ERO and Regional Entity compliance audits and investigations of users, owners and operators of the bulk power system. The Commission also conducts its own audits as well as independent investigations of significant blackouts, system disturbances and other reliability incidents. The Commission also monitors system disturbances to identify near and long-term issues affecting generation and transmission.
To determine the effectiveness of the compliance program, the Commission will track the number and type of violations, particularly violations of Reliability Standards involving high Violation Risk Factors.
The Commission staff will establish processes to track studies that are related to the development of reliability parameters associated with the integration of renewable energy into the electric transmission grid. Using this data, the Commission will perform analyses to see if these reliability parameters are feasible for the bulk power system. The Commission also will seek input from industry and will coordinate and work with other government agencies to identify reliability issues that affect the national goals of reducing carbon and increasing the penetration of renewable energy resources.
Management Initiatives. — The Commission has management initiatives underway and administrative processes in place to support its two strategic goals. These activities, including the effective management of human capital, agency resources and information technology, help the Commission work more efficiently, both within and across program areas. The Commission also understands that open lines of communication with affected parties and the public are critical for effective function of Commission operations. The Commission therefore communicates its policies and actions to the public in order to provide a transparent and open process.







Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0212-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

99.0 Reimbursable obligations 282 297 315
99.5 Below reporting threshold 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 282 298 316

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0212-0-1-276 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Reimbursable:
2001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,396 1,528 1,539

Clean Coal Technology

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0235-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Clean Coal Technology Program Closeout 2 2 2



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 2 2 2

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 17 18 16
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations 3



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 20 18 16
23.95 Total new obligations -2 -2 -2



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 18 16 14

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -149
55.00 Funds becoming available from prior year deferrals 149



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross)

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 9 8 10
73.10 Total new obligations 2 2 2
73.45 Recoveries of prior year obligations -3



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 8 10 12

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays

The Clean Coal Technology Program was established in the 1980s to perform commercial-scale demonstrations of advanced coal-based technologies. The budget proposes no new funding. All projects have concluded and only closeout activities remain.

Alternative Fuels Production

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5180-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 9 9 9



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 9 9 9

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays

The alternative fuels program was established in 1980 for the purpose of expediting the development and production of alternative fuels from coal. A loan guarantee was issued by the Department of Energy in 1982 for the construction and startup of the Great Plains Synthetic Fuels Plant to produce synthetic gas lignite coal.

Upon default of the borrower in 1985 under the terms of the loan guarantee, the Department acquired ownership of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project plant by foreclosure. On October 31, 1988, the Department completed the transfer of the Great Plains Plant to Dakota Gasification Company (DGC) under terms of an Asset Purchase Agreement.

Funds in this account are used to pay for expenses and responsibilities related to the Department's prior operation of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project and the administration of the Asset Purchase Agreement and related contracts and agreements which transferred the facility to the private sector. Remaining outstanding obligations are for carrying out contractual obligations through the end of the contract term in December 2009.

Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5523-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

01.00 Balance, start of year



01.99 Balance, start of year
Receipts:
02.20 OCS Receipts, Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund 50 50 50
02.21 OCS Receipts, Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund - legislative proposal subject to PAYGO -50



02.99 Total receipts and collections 50 50



04.00 Total: Balances and collections 50 50
Appropriations:
05.00 Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund -50 -50 -50
05.01 Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund - legislative proposal subject to PAYGO 50



05.99 Total appropriations -50 -50



07.99 Balance, end of year

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5523-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Consortium-Ultra-Deepwater 36 36 36
00.02 NETL-Ultra-Deepwater 14 14 14



10.00 Total new obligations 50 50 50

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 6 6 6
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 50 50 50



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 56 56 56
23.95 Total new obligations -50 -50 -50



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 6 6 6

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
60.20 Appropriation (special fund) 50 50 50

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 85 107 107
73.10 Total new obligations 50 50 50
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -28 -50 -50



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 107 107 107

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.97 Outlays from new mandatory authority 4 20 20
86.98 Outlays from mandatory balances 24 30 30



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 28 50 50

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 50 50 50
90.00 Outlays 28 50 50

Summary of Budget Authority and Outlays (in millions of dollars)


2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Enacted/requested:
Budget Authority 50 50 50
Outlays 28 50 50
Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO:
Budget Authority -50
Outlays -20
Total:
Budget Authority 50 50
Outlays 28 50 30

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) created a mandatory Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research program beginning in 2007. The program is funded from Federal revenues from oil and gas leases. This Budget proposes to cancel the program through a legislative proposal.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5523-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 10 8 8
25.2 Other services 1 1 1
25.5 Research and development contracts 36 41 41
31.0 Equipment 3



99.9 Total new obligations 50 50 50

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-5523-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 12

Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund

(Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5523-4-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Consortium-Ultra-Deepwater -36
00.02 NETL-Ultra-Deepwater -14



10.00 Total new obligations -50

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
22.00 New budget authority (gross) -50
23.95 Total new obligations 50



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
60.20 Appropriation (special fund) -50

Change in obligated balances:
73.10 Total new obligations -50
73.20 Total outlays (gross) 20



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year -30

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.97 Outlays from new mandatory authority -20

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority -50
90.00 Outlays -20

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5523-4-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services -8
25.2 Other services -1
25.5 Research and development contracts -41



99.9 Total new obligations -50

Elk Hills School Lands Fund

Title XXXIV, Subtitle B of Public Law 104-106 required the Department to sell the government's interest in Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) pursuant to the terms of the Act. The sale occurred in February 1998. Section 3415 of the Act required, among other things, that the Department make an offer of settlement based on the fair value of the State of California's longstanding claims to two parcels of land ("school lands'') within the Reserve. Under the Act, nine percent of the net proceeds were reserved in a contingent fund in the Treasury for payment to the State. In compliance with the Act and in order to remove any cloud over title which could diminish the sales value of the Reserve, the Department entered into a settlement agreement with the State on October 11, 1996. That agreement calls for payment to the State, subject to appropriations, of nine percent of the net proceeds of sale, payable over a seven-year period (without interest), commencing in 1999. Under the settlement agreement and provided that funds are appropriated, the first five installments are for $36 million each year, and the remaining balance is to be paid in two equal installments in years six and seven unless the seventh payment needs to be deferred in whole or in part due to the equity finalization schedule. Under the settlement agreement, $300 million has been paid to the State of California. There is no request for funding in 2011. The timing and levels of any future budget request are dependent on the schedule and results of the equity finalization process.

Payments to States under Federal Power Act

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5105-0-2-806 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

01.00 Balance, start of year 4



01.99 Balance, start of year 4
Receipts:
02.00 Licenses under Federal Power Act from Public Lands and National Forests, Payment to States (37 1/2%) 3 7 7



02.99 Total receipts and collections 3 7 7



04.00 Total: Balances and collections 3 7 11
Appropriations:
05.00 Payments to States under Federal Power Act -3 -3 -3



05.99 Total appropriations -3 -3 -3



07.99 Balance, end of year 4 8

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5105-0-2-806 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Direct program activity 3 3 3



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 3 3 3

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 3 3 3
23.95 Total new obligations -3 -3 -3

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
60.20 Appropriation (special fund) 3 3 3

Change in obligated balances:
73.10 Total new obligations 3 3 3
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -3 -3 -3

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.97 Outlays from new mandatory authority 3 3 3

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 3 3 3
90.00 Outlays 3 3 3

The States are paid 37.5 percent of the receipts from licenses for occupancy and use of national forests and public lands within their boundaries issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (16 U.S.C. 810).

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve

For necessary expenses for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage, operation, and management activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, $11,300,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5369-0-2-274 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 NEHOR 10 11 11



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 10 11 11

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 1 1 1
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 10 11 11



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 11 12 12
23.95 Total new obligations -10 -11 -11



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 1 1 1

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 10 11 11

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 9 10 10
73.10 Total new obligations 10 11 11
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -9 -11 -12



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 10 10 9

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 9 9
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 9 2 3



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 9 11 12

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 10 11 11
90.00 Outlays 9 11 12

The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an emergency supply of home heating oil supply for the Northeast States during times of inventory shortages and significant threats to immediate further supply. Two million barrels of heating oil will provide supplemental emergency supply over a 10-day delivery period, the time required for ships to carry heating oil from the Gulf Coast to New York Harbor.

Four-year contracts for the storage, operation and maintenance of the reserve were awarded in August 2007 to Hess Corp (for 1,000,000 barrels in New York harbor) to Morgan Stanley (for 750,000 barrels in New Haven, CT), and to Hess Corp (for 250,000 barrels in Groton, CT). A sale of 35,000 barrels was conducted at the time to offset storage costs. The Department repurchased 19,253 barrels of the oil in 2008. Purchase of the remainder, 15,427 barrels of oil, is scheduled for 2010. New storage contracts are planned for award in late 2011.

[Nuclear Waste Disposal]

[For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the purposes of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, Public Law 97-425, as amended (the "NWPA''), $98,400,000, to remain available until expended, and to be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund: Provided, That of the funds made available in this Act for nuclear waste disposal and defense nuclear waste disposal activities, 2.54 percent shall be provided to the Office of the Attorney General of the State of Nevada solely for expenditures, other than salaries and expenses of State employees, to conduct scientific oversight responsibilities and participate in licensing activities pursuant to the NWPA: Provided further, That notwithstanding the lack of a written agreement with the State of Nevada under section 117(c) of the NWPA, 0.51 percent shall be provided to Nye County, Nevada, for on-site oversight activities under section 117(d) of the NWPA: Provided further, That of the funds made available in this Act for nuclear waste disposal and defense nuclear waste disposal activities, 4.57 percent shall be provided to affected units of local government, as defined in the NWPA, to conduct appropriate activities and participate in licensing activities under Section 116(c) of the NWPA: Provided further, That of the amounts provided to affected units of local government, 7.5 percent of the funds provided for the affected units of local government shall be made available to affected units of local government in California with the balance made available to affected units of local government in Nevada for distribution as determined by the Nevada affected units of local government: Provided further, That of the funds made available in this Act for nuclear waste disposal and defense nuclear waste disposal activities, 0.25 percent shall be provided to the affected federally-recognized Indian tribes, as defined in the NWPA, solely for expenditures, other than salaries and expenses of tribal employees, to conduct appropriate activities and participate in licensing activities under section 118(b) of the NWPA: Provided further, That notwithstanding the provisions of chapters 65 and 75 of title 31, United States Code, the Department shall have no monitoring, auditing or other oversight rights or responsibilities over amounts provided to affected units of local government: Provided further, That the funds for the State of Nevada shall be made available solely to the Office of the Attorney General by direct payment and to units of local government by direct payment: Provided further, That 4.57 percent of the funds made available in this Act for nuclear waste disposal and defense nuclear waste disposal activities shall be provided to Nye County, Nevada, as payment equal to taxes under section 116(c)(3) of the NWPA: Provided further, That within 90 days of the completion of each Federal fiscal year, the Office of the Attorney General of the State of Nevada, each affected federally-recognized Indian tribe, and each of the affected units of local government shall provide certification to the Department of Energy that all funds expended from such payments have been expended for activities authorized by the NWPA and this Act: Provided further, That failure to provide such certification shall cause such entity to be prohibited from any further funding provided for similar activities: Provided further, That none of the funds herein appropriated may be: (1) used directly or indirectly to influence legislative action, except for normal and recognized executive-legislative communications, on any matter pending before Congress or a State legislature or for lobbying activity as provided in 18 U.S.C. 1913; (2) used for litigation expenses; or (3) used to support multi-State efforts or other coalition building activities inconsistent with the restrictions contained in this Act: Provided further, That all proceeds and recoveries realized by the Secretary in carrying out activities authorized by the NWPA, including but not limited to, any proceeds from the sale of assets, shall be available without further appropriation and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That of the funds made available in this Act for Nuclear Waste Disposal, $5,000,000 shall be provided to create a Blue Ribbon Commission to consider all alternatives for nuclear waste disposal: Provided further, That no funds provided in this Act or any previous Act may be used to pursue repayment or collection of funds provided in any fiscal year to affected units of local government for oversight activities that had been previously approved by the Department of Energy, or to withhold payment of any such funds.] (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5227-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

01.00 Balance, start of year 20,494 22,162 24,028



01.99 Balance, start of year 20,494 22,162 24,028
Receipts:
02.20 Nuclear Waste Disposal Fund 770 773 779
02.40 Earnings on Investments, Nuclear Waste Disposal Fund 1,096 1,224 1,323



02.99 Total receipts and collections 1,866 1,997 2,102



04.00 Total: Balances and collections 22,360 24,159 26,130
Appropriations:
05.00 Nuclear Waste Disposal -145 -98
05.01 Salaries and Expenses -49 -29 -10
05.02 Salaries and Expenses -4 -4 -2



05.99 Total appropriations -198 -131 -12



07.99 Balance, end of year 22,162 24,028 26,118

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5227-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Repository 76 44
00.02 Program Direction 63 70



10.00 Total new obligations 139 114

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 10 16
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 145 98



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 155 114
23.95 Total new obligations -139 -114



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 16

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.20 Appropriation (special fund) 145 98

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 87 62 33
73.10 Total new obligations 139 114
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -164 -143



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 62 33 33

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 93 98
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 71 45



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 164 143

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 145 98
90.00 Outlays 164 143

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
92.01 Total investments, start of year: Federal securities: Par value 42,570 44,643 46,529
92.02 Total investments, end of year: Federal securities: Par value 44,643 46,529 48,631

The Nuclear Waste Disposal Account was established as part of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-425), as amended, to provide funding to implement Federal policy for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Administration has determined that developing a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is not a workable option and that the Nation needs a different solution for nuclear waste disposal. As a result, the Department will discontinue its application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a high-level waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain in 2010 and establish a Blue Ribbon Commission to develop a new strategy for nuclear waste management and disposal. All funding for development of the Yucca Mountain facility will be eliminated, such as further land acquisition, transportation access, and additional engineering. Ongoing responsibilities under the Act, including administration of the Nuclear Waste Fund and the Standard Contract, will continue under the Office of Nuclear Energy, which will lead future waste management activities. Residual responsibilities for site remediation will be assumed by NNSA and the Office of Environmental Management.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5227-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 26 25
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 28 27
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 6 5
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1
23.2 Rental payments to others 3 3
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 31 6
25.2 Other services 32 16
25.3 Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 3 5
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 9 25
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 26 26



99.9 Total new obligations 139 114

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-5227-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 243 243

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund

For necessary expenses in carrying out uranium enrichment facility decontamination and decommissioning, remedial actions, and other activities of title II of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and title X, subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, [$573,850,000] $708,498,000, to be derived from the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5231-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

01.00 Balance, start of year 4,453 4,536 4,649



01.99 Balance, start of year 4,453 4,536 4,649
Receipts:
02.20 Domestic Utility Fees, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 200
02.40 Earnings on Investments, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 156 224 228
02.41 General Fund Payment - Defense, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 463 463 497



02.99 Total receipts and collections 619 687 925



04.00 Total: Balances and collections 5,072 5,223 5,574
Appropriations:
05.00 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund -536 -574 -708



05.99 Total appropriations -536 -574 -708



07.99 Balance, end of year 4,536 4,649 4,866

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5231-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Oak Ridge 328 225 208
00.02 Paducah 195 119 84
00.03 Portsmouth 318 235 416
00.04 U/Th Reimbursements 33 37 10
00.05 Program Direction (Recovery Act) 1 1



10.00 Total new obligations 875 617 718

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 2 53 10
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 926 574 708



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 928 627 718
23.95 Total new obligations -875 -617 -718



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 53 10

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 390
40.20 Appropriation (special fund) 536 574 708



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 926 574 708

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 252 541 478
73.10 Total new obligations 875 617 718
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -586 -680 -892



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 541 478 304

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 357 402 496
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 229 278 396



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 586 680 892

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 926 574 708
90.00 Outlays 586 680 892

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
92.01 Total investments, start of year: Federal securities: Par value 4,710 4,761 4,870
92.02 Total Investments, end of year: Federal securities: Par Value 4,761 4,870 5,178

Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities.—Funds projects to decontaminate, decommission, and remediate the sites and facilities of the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio; Paducah, Kentucky; and East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Uranium/Thorium Licensee Reimbursement.—Provides funds to reimburse licensees for the Federal Government's share of the cost of cleanup of uranium and thorium processing sites.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5231-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 4 4 4
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services 553 342 362
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 315 268 349
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 2 2 2



99.9 Total new obligations 875 617 718

Uranium Sales and Remediation

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-5530-0-2-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Sales of Uranium 29



10.00 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 29

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 29
23.95 Total new obligations -29



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 13 19
73.10 Total new obligations 29
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -23 -19



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 19

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 23 19

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays 23 19

The Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 2006 provided the Department of Energy authority to barter, transfer, or sell uranium and to use any proceeds, without fiscal year limitation, to remediate contaminated uranium inventories held by the Secretary of Energy.

Isotope Production and Distribution Program Fund

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4180-0-3-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
09.01 Isotope Production and Distribution Reimbursable program 55 41 42



10.00 Total new obligations 55 41 42

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 14 24 24
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 65 41 42



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 79 65 66
23.95 Total new obligations -55 -41 -42



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 24 24 24

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
58.00 Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) 65 41 42

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 14 36 36
73.10 Total new obligations 55 41 42
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -33 -41 -42



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 36 36 36

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 11 41 42
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 22



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 33 41 42

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -40 -19 -20
88.40 Non-Federal sources -25 -22 -22



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -65 -41 -42

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority
90.00 Outlays -32

The mission of the DOE isotope production and distribution program includes the production and/or distribution of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services; maintenance of infrastructure required to produce and supply isotope products and related services; and the pursuit of R&D on new and improved isotope production and processing techniques. Commercial isotopes will continue to be priced to recover full cost. Research isotopes will be made available at reduced price based on an equitable basis to provide reasonable compensation to the government while encouraging research and development.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4180-0-3-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Reimbursable obligations:
25.2 Other services 1 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 46 40 41
31.0 Equipment 8



99.9 Total new obligations 55 41 42

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

For administrative expenses in carrying out the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, [$20,000,000] $9,998,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0322-0-1-272 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Direct Loan Subsidy 3,280 3,227
00.05 Direct program activity 12
00.09 Administrative Expenses 9 20 10
00.10 Administrative Expenses -ARRA 8 2



10.00 Total new obligations 3,297 3,261 10

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 4,223 994
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 7,520 32 10



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 7,520 4,255 1,004
23.95 Total new obligations -3,297 -3,261 -10



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 4,223 994 994

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 7,510 20 10
42.00 Transferred from other accounts 10



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 7,520 20 10
Mandatory:
60.00 Appropriation 12



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 7,520 32 10

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2,838 4,376
73.10 Total new obligations 3,297 3,261 10
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -459 -1,723 -2,854



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 2,838 4,376 1,532

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 459 15 8
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,696 2,846
86.97 Outlays from new mandatory authority 12



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 459 1,723 2,854

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 7,520 32 10
90.00 Outlays 459 1,723 2,854

Summary of Loan Levels, Subsidy Budget Authority and Outlays by Program (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0322-0-1-272 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct loan levels supportable by subsidy budget authority:
115001 Direct Auto Loans 8,567 16,433



115999 Total direct loan levels 8,567 16,433
Direct loan subsidy (in percent):
132001 Direct Auto Loans 38.29 19.64 0.00



132999 Weighted average subsidy rate 38.29 19.64 0.00
Direct loan subsidy budget authority:
133001 Direct Auto Loans 3,280 3,227



133999 Total subsidy budget authority 3,280 3,227
Direct loan subsidy outlays:
134001 Direct Auto Loans 450 1,688 2,841



134999 Total subsidy outlays 450 1,688 2,841
Direct loan upward reestimates:
135001 Direct Auto Loans 12



135999 Total upward reestimate budget authority 12
Direct loan downward reestimates:
137001 Direct Auto Loans -10



137999 Total downward reestimate budget authority -10

Administrative expense data:
3510 Budget authority 20 20 20
3580 Outlays from balances 2
3590 Outlays from new authority 9 15 13

Section 136 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 established a direct loan program to support the development of advanced technology vehicles and associated components in the United States, known as the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program (ATVM). The 2009 Continuing Resolution (CR), enacted on September 30, 2008, appropriated $7.5 billion to support a maximum of $25 billion in loans under the ATVM. The ATVM provides loans to automobile and automobile part manufactures for the cost of re-equipping, expanding, or establishing manufacturing facilities in the United States to produce advanced technology vehicles or qualified components and for associated engineering integration costs.

The 2011 Budget reflects placeholder estimates for direct loan subsidy costs. These estimates are not related to any specific project proposals. DOE will calculate the credit subsidy cost of any direct loan on a case-by-case basis in accordance with Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 (FCRA) and OMB Circular A-11. For any project, the terms and conditions of the loan, the risks associated with the project, and any other factor that affects the amount and timing of such cash flows will affect the credit subsidy cost calculations.

As required by the FCRA, this account records, for this program, the subsidy costs associated with the direct loans committed in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans that resulted from obligations or commitments in any year), as well as administrative expenses of this program. The subsidy amounts are estimated on a present value basis; the administrative expenses are estimated on a cash basis.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0322-0-1-272 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 16 21 9
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 3,280 3,239



99.9 Total new obligations 3,297 3,261 10

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0322-0-1-272 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 4 9 9

Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program

[Such sums as are derived from amounts received from borrowers pursuant to section 1702(b)(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 under this heading in prior Acts, shall be collected in accordance with section 502(7) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974:] Subject to section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, commitments to guarantee loans for nuclear power facilities under title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 shall not exceed a total principal amount of $36,000,000,000, to remain available until committed; Provided, That these amounts are in addition to authorities provided in any other Act; Provided further, That for amounts collected pursuant to section 1702(b)(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the source of such payment received from borrowers is not a loan or other debt obligation that is guaranteed by the Federal Government: Provided further, That pursuant to section 1702(b)(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, no appropriations are available to pay the subsidy cost of such guarantees for nuclear power facilities: Provided further, That for the cost of loan guarantees for renewable energy system and efficient end-use energy technology projects under section 1703 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, $500,000,000 is appropriated, to remain available until expended: Provided[,] further, That an additional amount for necessary administrative expenses to carry out this Loan Guarantee program, [$43,000,000] $58,000,000 is appropriated, to remain available until expended: Provided further, That [$43,000,000] $58,000,000 of the fees collected pursuant to section 1702(h) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 shall be credited as offsetting collections to this account to cover administrative expenses and shall remain available until expended, so as to result in a final fiscal year [2010] 2011 appropriations from the general fund estimated at not more than $0: Provided further, That fees collected under section 1702(h) in excess of the amount appropriated for administrative expenses shall not be available until appropriated. (Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010.)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0208-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Direct Loan Subsidy 40 1,049 2,347
00.02 Guaranteed Loan Subsidy 225 525
00.09 Administrative Expense 24 58 58



10.00 Total new obligations 64 1,332 2,930

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 5 3,921 2,636
22.00 New budget authority (gross) 3,980 47 558



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 3,985 3,968 3,194
23.95 Total new obligations -64 -1,332 -2,930



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 3,921 2,636 264

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00 Appropriation 6,000 500
41.00 Transferred to other accounts -2,040



43.00 Appropriation (total discretionary) 3,960 500
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
58.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 27 47 58
58.45 Portion precluded from obligation (limitation on obligations) -7



58.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total discretionary) 20 47 58



70.00 Total new budget authority (gross) 3,980 47 558

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 2 52 514
73.10 Total new obligations 64 1,332 2,930
73.20 Total outlays (gross) -14 -870 -2,352



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 52 514 1,092

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new discretionary authority 6 47 213
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances 8 823 2,139



87.00 Total outlays (gross) 14 870 2,352

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40 Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal sources (Administrative) -27 -47 -58

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority 3,953 500
90.00 Outlays -13 823 2,294

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
94.02 Unavailable balance, end of year: Offsetting collections 7

Summary of Loan Levels, Subsidy Budget Authority and Outlays by Program (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0208-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct loan levels supportable by subsidy budget authority:
115001 Section 1703 FFB Loans (Self Pay) 17,500 31,000
115002 Section 1705 FFB Loans 535 7,217 14,434
115003 Section 1703 FFB Loans (EERE) 2,577



115999 Total direct loan levels 535 24,717 48,011
Direct loan subsidy (in percent):
132001 Section 1703 FFB Loans (Self Pay) 0.00 0.00 0.00
132002 Section 1705 FFB Loans 7.57 14.53 14.53
132003 Section 1703 FFB Loans (EERE) 0.00 0.00 9.70



132999 Weighted average subsidy rate 7.57 4.24 4.89
Direct loan subsidy budget authority:
133002 Section 1705 FFB Loans 40 1,049 2,097
133003 Section 1703 FFB Loans (EERE) 250



133999 Total subsidy budget authority 40 1,049 2,347
Direct loan subsidy outlays:
134002 Section 1705 FFB Loans 2 659 1,728
134003 Section 1703 FFB Loans (EERE) 155



134999 Total subsidy outlays 2 659 1,883

Guaranteed loan levels supportable by subsidy budget authority:
215001 Section 1703 Loan Guarantees (Self Pay) 3,105
215002 Section 1705 Loan Guarantees 3,112 8,522



215999 Total loan guarantee levels 6,217 8,522
Guaranteed loan subsidy (in percent):
232001 Section 1703 Loan Guarantees (Self Pay) 0.00 0.00 0.00
232002 Section 1705 Loan Guarantees 0.00 7.23 6.16



232999 Weighted average subsidy rate 0.00 3.62 6.16
Guaranteed loan subsidy budget authority:
233002 Section 1705 Loan Guarantees 225 525



233999 Total subsidy budget authority 225 525
Guaranteed loan subsidy outlays:
234002 Section 1705 Loan Guarantees 140 411



234999 Total subsidy outlays 140 411

Administrative expense data:
3510 Budget authority 27 43 58
3580 Outlays from balances 7
3590 Outlays from new authority 5 43 58

The Loan Guarantee Program Office will consider and coordinate Departmental action on all loan guarantee applications submitted to the Department of Energy in compliance with Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct of 2005). Section 1703 of that Act authorizes the Department to provide loan guarantees for renewable energy systems, advanced nuclear facilities, coal gasification, carbon sequestration, energy efficiency, and many other types of projects. These projects must avoid, reduce, or sequester air pollutants or anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases; employ new or significantly improved technologies compared to commercial technologies in service in the United States at the time the guarantee is issued; and offer a reasonable prospect of repayment of the principal and interest on the guaranteed obligation. DOE has been implementing this program under authorizing law that allows borrowers to pay the credit subsidy costs of these loan guarantees.

Section 406 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Pub. L. No. 111-5 (the "Recovery Act"), amended the LGPO's authorizing legislation, by establishing Section 1705 which is a temporary program for the rapid deployment of renewable energy and electric power transmission projects. Section 1705 provided $4 billion in appropriated credit subsidy which allows the Secretary to make loan guarantees available for the following categories of projects that commence construction not later than September 30, 2011: renewable energy systems, including incremental hydropower, that generate electricity or thermal energy, and facilities that manufacture related components; electric power transmission systems, including upgrading and reconductoring projects; and leading edge biofuel projects that will use technologies performing at the pilot or demonstrations scale that the Secretary determines are likely to become commercial technologies and will produce transportation fuels that substantially reduce life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions compared to other transportation fuel. Funding for these biofuel projects shall not exceed $500,000,000.

The decision to issue loan guarantees will depend on the merits and benefits of particular project proposals and their compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements.

As of 2010, $51.0 billion in loan guarantee authority was available to support all eligible projects under Section 1703. Loan volume utilized may not be reused. The 2011 Budget increases the program's loan authority by $36.0 billion to support additional nuclear power facilities and provides an additional $500 million in appropriated subsidy for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that are eligible under Section 1703. The 2011 Budget reflects placeholder estimates based on illustrative examples, unrelated to any specific project.

The Loan Guarantee Program Office will centralize loan guarantee services for the Department to ensure all processes and criteria are applied uniformly in accordance with established requirements, procedures and guidelines. The Department requests $58.0 million in funding in 2011 to operate the Office and support personnel and associated costs. This request will be offset by collections authorized under the EPAct of 2005. To ensure that the Department meets statutory requirements and implements effective management and oversight of its loan guarantee activities, program funding also will support the procurement of outside expertise in areas such as finance, project engineering, and commercial market assessment.

As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, this account records, for this program, the subsidy costs associated with the loan guarantees committed in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans or loan guarantees that resulted from obligations or commitments in any year), as well as administrative expenses of this program. The subsidy amounts are estimated on a present value basis; the administrative expenses are estimated on a cash basis.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-0208-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 3 12 20
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 13 23 25
25.2 Other services 7 16 16
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 40 1,279 2,867



99.9 Total new obligations 64 1,332 2,930

Employment Summary


Identification code 89-0208-0-1-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment 18 84 138

Title 17 Innovative Technology Direct Loan Financing Account

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4455-0-3-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Direct Loans 535 24,717 48,011
00.02 FFB Interest 323 1,395



10.00 Total new obligations 535 25,040 49,406

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 40 2,999
22.00 New financing authority (gross) 575 27,999 64,392



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 575 28,039 67,391
23.95 Total new obligations -535 -25,040 -49,406



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 40 2,999 17,985

New financing authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
67.10 Authority to borrow 7,217 24,992
67.16 Authority to borrow (12 U.S.C. 2281-96) 535 17,500 31,000



67.90 Authority to borrow (total mandatory) 535 24,717 55,992
69.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 1 2,683 5,582
69.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) 39 599 2,818



69.90 Spending authority from offsetting collections (total mandatory) 40 3,282 8,400



70.00 Total new financing authority (gross) 575 27,999 64,392

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year 475 17,084
73.10 Total new obligations 535 25,040 49,406
73.20 Total financing disbursements (gross) -21 -7,832 -22,817
74.00 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) -39 -599 -2,818



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year 475 17,084 40,855

Outlays (gross), detail:
87.00 Total financing disbursements (gross) 21 7,832 22,817

Offsets:
Against gross financing authority and financing disbursements:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -1 -659 -1,883
88.25 Interest on uninvested funds -272 -945
88.40 Interest Received on Loans
88.40 Non-Federal sources -31 -65
88.40 Subsidy paid by borrower -1,721 -2,689



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -1 -2,683 -5,582
Against gross financing authority only:
88.95 Change in receivables from program accounts -39 -599 -2,818

Net financing authority and financing disbursements:
89.00 Financing authority 535 24,717 55,992
90.00 Financing disbursements 20 5,149 17,235

Status of Direct Loans (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4455-0-3-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Position with respect to appropriations act limitation on obligations:
1111 Limitation on direct loans 47,000 18,000
1121 Limitation available from carry-forward 47,000 29,500
1131 Direct loan obligations exempt from limitation 535 7,217 17,011
1143 Unobligated limitation carried forward (P.L. xx) (-) -47,000 -29,500 -16,500



1150 Total direct loan obligations 535 24,717 48,011

Cumulative balance of direct loans outstanding:
1210 Outstanding, start of year 21 7,305
1231 Disbursements: Direct loan disbursements 21 7,284 18,114
1251 Repayments: Repayments and prepayments



1290 Outstanding, end of year 21 7,305 25,419

Balance Sheet (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4455-0-3-271 2008 actual 2009 actual

ASSETS:
1101 Federal assets: Fund balances with Treasury 2
Net value of assets related to post-1991 direct loans receivable:
1401 Direct loans receivable, gross 21
1405 Allowance for subsidy cost (-) -2


1499 Net present value of assets related to direct loans 19


1999 Total assets 21
LIABILITIES:
2103 Federal liabilities: Debt 21


2999 Total liabilities 21


4999 Total liabilities and net position 21

Title 17 Innovative Technology Guaranteed Loan Financing Account

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4577-0-4-271 2009 actual 2010 est. 2011 est.

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Default Claims 5 40



10.00 Total new obligations 5 40

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year 137
22.00 New financing authority (gross) 142 439



23.90 Total budgetary resources available for obligation 142 576
23.95 Total new obligations -5 -40



24.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year 137 536

New financing authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
69.00 Offsetting collections (cash) 142 439

Change in obligated balances:
73.10 Total new obligations 5 40
73.20 Total financing disbursements (gross) -5 -40



74.40 Obligated balance, end of year

Outlays (gross), detail:
87.00 Total financing disbursements (gross) 5 40

Offsets:
Against gross financing authority and financing disbursements:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00 Federal sources -140 -411
88.25 Interest on uninvested funds -2 -25
88.40 Non-Federal sources -3



88.90 Total, offsetting collections (cash) -142 -439

Net financing authority and financing disbursements:
89.00 Financing authority
90.00 Financing disbursements -137 -399

Status of Guaranteed Loans (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89-4577-0-4-271 2009 actual