DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

National Nuclear Security Administration

Federal Funds

Office of the Administrator

For necessary expenses of the Office of the Administrator in the National Nuclear Security Administration, including official reception and representation expenses not to exceed $12,000, $397,784,000, to remain available until September 30, 2015.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0313–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Office of the Administrator 408 422 398

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 5 9
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 2



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 7 9
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 410 413 398



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 410 413 398
1930 Total budgetary resources available 417 422 398
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 9

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 108 92 93
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 408 422 398
3020 Outlays (gross) –422 –421 –411
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –2



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 92 93 80
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 108 92 93
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 92 93 80

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 410 413 398
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 339 341 328
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 83 80 83



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 422 421 411
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 410 413 398
4190 Outlays, net (total) 422 421 411

Office of the Administrator._This account provides the Federal salaries and other expenses of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) mission and mission support staff, including the Federal personnel for Defense Programs, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Emergency Operations, Defense Nuclear Security, Acquisition and Project Management, the Office of the Chief Information Officer, Safety and Health, the Administrator's direct staff, and Federal employees at the Albuquerque Complex and site offices. The Office of the Administrator creates a well-managed, inclusive, responsive, and accountable organization through the strategic management of human capital and greater integration of budget and performance data. Program direction for Naval Reactors is within that program's account, and program direction for Secure Transportation Asset is within the Weapons Activities account.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0313–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 224 228 212
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 4 5 5
11.5 Other personnel compensation 6 9 12
11.8 Special personal services payments 1 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 235 244 231
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 62 62 63
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 13 16 15
22.0 Transportation of things 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 17 17 19
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 33 35 25
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 32 34 29
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 8 6 7
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 1 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 3 3 3
31.0 Equipment 1 1
32.0 Land and structures 2
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1



99.9 Total new obligations 408 422 398

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0313–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,886 1,817 1,817
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 2

Naval Reactors

For Department of Energy expenses necessary for naval reactors activities to carry out the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition (by purchase, condemnation, construction, or otherwise) of real property, plant, and capital equipment, facilities, and facility expansion, $1,246,134,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $44,404,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0314–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Naval reactors development 417 424 419
0020 Program Direction 40 45 44
0030 S8G prototype refueling 99 100 144
0040 Naval reactors operations and infrastructure 354 361 456
0050 Construction 40 8 70
0060 OHIO replacement reactor systems development 120 122 126



0900 Total new obligations 1,070 1,060 1,259

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 5 16 43
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 6 16 43
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 1,080 1,087 1,246



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 1,080 1,087 1,246
1930 Total budgetary resources available 1,086 1,103 1,289
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 16 43 30

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 269 311 183
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1,070 1,060 1,259
3020 Outlays (gross) –1,027 –1,188 –1,199
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 311 183 243
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 269 311 183
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 311 183 243

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 1,080 1,087 1,246
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 790 924 1,059
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 237 264 140



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 1,027 1,188 1,199
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 1,080 1,087 1,246
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1,027 1,188 1,199

Naval Reactors._This account funds all naval nuclear propulsion work. It begins with reactor technology development and design, continues through reactor operation and maintenance, and ends with reactor plant disposal. The program ensures the safe and reliable operation of reactor plants in nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers (constituting over 40 percent of the Navy's combatants), and fulfills the Navy's requirements for new nuclear propulsion plants that meet current and future national defense requirements.
Due to the crucial nature of nuclear reactor work, Naval Reactors is a centrally managed organization. Federal employees oversee and set policies/procedures for developing new reactor plants and operating existing nuclear plants and the facilities that support these plants.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0314–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 26 28 26
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 27 29 26
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 7 8 8
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 5 5 2
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 3 3 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 922 918 1,132
26.0 Supplies and materials 1 1
31.0 Equipment 25 16 16
32.0 Land and structures 77 77 71
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 1,070 1,060 1,259

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0314–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 231 238 238

Weapons Activities

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for atomic energy defense weapons activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion $7,868,409,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0020 Directed stockpile work 1,854 2,099 2,429
0021 Science campaign 332 347 398
0022 Engineering campaign 141 149 150
0023 Inertial confinement fusion ignition and high yield campaign 474 455 401
0024 Advanced simulation and computing campaign 616 596 564
0025 Readiness campaign 130 129 198
0026 Readiness in technical base and facilities 1,892 2,201 122
0027 Secure transportation asset 228 218 219
0029 Nuclear programs 741



0091 Defense programs (DP), subtotal 5,667 6,194 5,222
0150 Nuclear counterterrorism incident response 220 246
0160 Facilities and infrastructure recapitalization program 96
0170 Site stewardship 82 90 1,706
0180 Defense nuclear security 688 672 679
0181 Cyber security 132 134
0182 NNSA CIO Activities 148
0183 Legacy contractor pensions 168 232 280
0184 National security applications 10 18



0191 Non-DP activities, subtotal 1,396 1,392 2,813



0300 Subtotal, Weapons Activities 7,063 7,586 8,035



0799 Total direct obligations 7,063 7,586 8,035
0810 Reimbursable program 1,323 1,283 1,272



0900 Total new obligations 8,386 8,869 9,307

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 26 211 169
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 41



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 67 211 169
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 7,234 7,557 7,868
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –20



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 7,214 7,557 7,868
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 1,354 1,385 1,385
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –38 –115 –115



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 1,316 1,270 1,270
1900 Budget authority (total) 8,530 8,827 9,138
1930 Total budgetary resources available 8,597 9,038 9,307
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 211 169

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 5,275 4,951 5,271
3001 Adjustments to unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 –11
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 8,386 8,869 9,307
3020 Outlays (gross) –8,658 –8,549 –10,074
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –41



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 4,951 5,271 4,504
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –2,017 –1,979 –1,864
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 38 115 115



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –1,979 –1,864 –1,749
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 3,247 2,972 3,407
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 2,972 3,407 2,755

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 8,530 8,827 9,138
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 4,813 5,739 5,940
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 3,845 2,810 4,134



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 8,658 8,549 10,074
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –1,253 –1,280 –1,280
4033 Non-Federal sources –101 –105 –105



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –1,354 –1,385 –1,385
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 38 115 115



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 7,214 7,557 7,868
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 7,304 7,164 8,689
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 7,214 7,557 7,868
4190 Outlays, net (total) 7,304 7,164 8,689

Programs funded within the Weapons Activities appropriation support the nation's current and future defense posture, and its attendant nationwide infrastructure of science, technology and engineering capabilities. Weapons Activities provides for the maintenance and refurbishment of nuclear weapons to sustain confidence in their safety, reliability, and performance; expansion of scientific, engineering, and manufacturing capabilities to enable certification of the enduring nuclear weapons stockpile; and manufacture of nuclear weapon components. Weapons Activities also provides for continued maintenance and investment in the NNSA nuclear complex to be more responsive and cost effective. The major elements of the program include the following:

Directed Stockpile Work._Encompasses all activities that directly support the nuclear weapons stockpile. These activities include: maintenance and surveillance; planned refurbishment; reliability assessment; weapon dismantlement and disposal; and research, development, and certification technology efforts to meet stockpile requirements.

Campaigns._Focuses on scientific, technical, and engineering efforts to develop and maintain critical capabilities, tools, and processes needed to support science based stockpile stewardship, refurbishment, and continued certification of the stockpile over the long-term in the absence of underground nuclear testing.

Nuclear Programs._Focuses on the strategic management of Defense Programs Special Nuclear Materials inventories, recovery and processing technologies, storage, and sustainment of essential Weapons Activities through capability investment.

Secure Transportation Asset._Provides for the safe, secure movement of nuclear weapons, special nuclear material, and weapon components to meet projected DOE, Department of Defense (DOD), and other customer requirements. The Program Direction in this account provides for the secure transportation workforce, including the Federal agents.

Site Stewardship._Ensures the overall health and viability of necessary site-wide infrastructure to support NNSA, DOE, and other national missions, with a focus on maintaining environmental compliance, achieving energy efficiency, dispositioning nuclear materials, and establishing a new standardized corporate project management enterprise, while efficiently providing common and shared services for the various program customers and maximizing the overall availability and utility of the NNSA nuclear complex for all programmatic objectives.

Defense Nuclear Security._Provides protection for NNSA personnel, facilities, and nuclear weapons from a full spectrum of threats, most notably terrorism. Provides for all safeguards and security requirements including protective forces and systems at all NNSA sites.

NNSA Chief Information Officer Activities._Provides for research and development of information technology and cyber security solutions such as identity, credential, and access management to help meet energy security, proliferation resistance, and climate goals.
NNSA's request reflects the partnership between NNSA and the DOD to maintain and modernize the nuclear deterrent. The DOD's NNSA Program Support account has the amounts for Weapons Activities that are shown in the table below, underscoring the close link between these activities and DOD nuclear weapons-related requirements and missions. The OMB will ensure that future budget year allocations to NNSA occur in the required amounts. Total Weapons Activities funding for each year will thereby equal the amounts projected in the table below with the amounts above.

Department of Defense Support for Weapons Activities (in millions)


Future Funds from Weapons Activities


from DOD Total Including


DOD Funds

FY 2014 0 7,868
FY 2015 948 8,550
FY 2016 1,130 8,785
FY 2017 1,133 8,933
FY 2018 1,271 9,293

OMB will ensure that the following additional allocations from DOD occur as planned for Naval Reactors: FY 2015, $249 million; FY 2016, $314 million; FY 2017, $470 million; and FY 2018, $393 million.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 44 44 47
11.5 Other personnel compensation 13 14 14



11.9 Total personnel compensation 57 58 61
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 21 21 21
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 6 5 5
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 5 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 123 45 45
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 389 327 270
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 8 12 12
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 5,749 6,205 6,716
25.5 Research and development contracts 102 80 80
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 10 10
26.0 Supplies and materials 8 11 11
31.0 Equipment 78 296 296
32.0 Land and structures 472 457 450
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 44 55 55



99.0 Direct obligations 7,063 7,586 8,035
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1,323 1,283 1,272



99.9 Total new obligations 8,386 8,869 9,307

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 547 547 562

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for defense nuclear nonproliferation activities, in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, $2,140,142,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0309–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Defense nuclear nonproliferation research and development (formerly nonproliferation and verification research and development) 348 448 389
0020 Elimination of weapons-grade plutonium production 1
0030 Nonproliferation and international security 153 152 142
0040 International material protection and cooperation (formerly international nuclear materials protection and cooperation) 577 561 370
0050 U.S. surplus fissile materials disposition 667 708 503
0070 Russian surplus fissile materials disposition 1 2
0080 Global threat reduction initiative 499 492 425
0081 Nuclear counterterrorism incident response 181
0082 Counterterrorism and counterproliferation programs 75
0085 Legacy contractor pensions 56 69 94



0100 Subtotal, obligations by program activity 2,302 2,432 2,179



0799 Total direct obligations 2,302 2,432 2,179
0801 INMP&C international contributions 6
0802 GTRI international contribution 5 1



0899 Total reimbursable obligations 11 1



0900 Total new obligations 2,313 2,433 2,179

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 25 61 39
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 48



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 73 61 39
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 2,324 2,431 2,140
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –6
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –7
1131 Unobligated balance of appropriations permanently reduced –21 –21



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 2,290 2,410 2,140
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 11 1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 11 1
1900 Budget authority (total) 2,301 2,411 2,140
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2,374 2,472 2,179
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 61 39

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 2,090 1,830 1,919
3001 Adjustments to unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 –1
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 2,313 2,433 2,179
3020 Outlays (gross) –2,524 –2,344 –2,448
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –48



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,830 1,919 1,650
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 2,089 1,830 1,919
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1,830 1,919 1,650

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 2,301 2,411 2,140
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 825 1,326 1,177
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,699 1,018 1,271



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 2,524 2,344 2,448
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4034 Offsetting governmental collections –11 –1
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 2,290 2,410 2,140
4190 Outlays, net (total) 2,513 2,343 2,448

Programs funded within the Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation appropriation account support the mission to: 1) prevent the spread of materials, technology, and expertise relating to weapons of mass destruction (WMD); 2) advance the technologies to detect the proliferation of WMD worldwide; 3) eliminate or secure inventories of surplus materials and infrastructure usable for nuclear weapons; and 4) respond to nuclear or radiological incidents worldwide. The programs address the danger that hostile nations or terrorist groups may acquire WMD or weapons-usable material, dual-use production technology, or WMD expertise. The major elements of the appropriation account include the following:

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)._Formerly Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development, this program drives the innovation of unilateral and multi-lateral technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize: 1) foreign nuclear weapons programs, 2) illicit diversion of special nuclear materials, and 3) nuclear detonations. DNN R&D changed its name to reflect a stronger alignment with its mission space as expressed in both the National Nuclear Security Administration and Department of Energy strategic plans and to communicate the scope of its R&D activities more clearly. To meet national and departmental nuclear security requirements, DNN R&D leverages the unique facilities and scientific skills of the Department of Energy, academia, and industry for the performance of research, conduct of technology demonstrations, and development of prototypes for integration into operational systems.

Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS)._The NIS mission is to prevent and counter the proliferation of WMD, including materials, technologies, and expertise, by states and non-state actors. The program provides policy and technical support for nonproliferation and associated treaties and agreements, domestic and international legal and regulatory controls, and diplomatic and counter-proliferation initiatives, and it cooperates with international organizations and foreign partners on export controls, safeguards, and security. The program makes vital contributions to strengthen international security and the nuclear nonproliferation regime in four main areas: (1) Nuclear Safeguards and Security, (2) Nuclear Controls, (3) Nuclear Verification, and (4) Nonproliferation Policy. The NIS program safeguards nuclear material to ensure it is not diverted for non-peaceful uses; controls the spread of WMD material, technology, and expertise; and verifies nuclear reductions and programs.

International Materials Protection and Cooperation (IMPC)._ The IMPC program supports one of the President's top priorities to lead a global effort to secure all nuclear weapons materials at vulnerable sites within four years—the most effective way to prevent terrorists from acquiring a nuclear bomb. The IMPC program prevents nuclear terrorism by working in Russia and other regions of concern to: 1) secure and eliminate vulnerable nuclear weapons and weapons exploitable materials, and 2) install and sustain detection equipment at international crossing points and ports to prevent and detect the illicit transfer of nuclear material. The program continues to improve the security of nuclear material and nuclear warheads in Russia and other countries of proliferation concern by installing Material, Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) upgrades and providing sustainability support to sites with previously installed MPC&A upgrades. Reducing the potential for diversion of nuclear warheads and nuclear materials has been a critical priority for the United States. The United States, through DOE/NNSA's Second Line of Defense program, will continue to work with international partners to prevent nuclear smuggling through border crossings, airports, seaports, and within borders.

Fissile Materials Disposition (FMD)._The program goal is to dispose of surplus Russian weapon-grade plutonium and surplus U.S. weapon-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium. To dispose of U.S. plutonium, the program has been building the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, which would enable the Department of Energy to dispose of plutonium by converting it into MOX fuel and burning it in commercial nuclear reactors. This approach may be unaffordable, though, due to cost growth and fiscal pressure. While the Administration will assess the feasibility of alternative plutonium disposition strategies, resulting in a slowdown of MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility construction in 2014, it is nonetheless committed to the overarching goals of the plutonium disposition program to: 1) dispose of excess U.S. plutonium; and 2) achieve Russian disposition of equal quantities of plutonium. The Administration recognizes the importance of the U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA), whereby each side committed to dispose of at least 34 metric tons of weapon-grade plutonium.

Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)._The GTRI mission is to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. The GTRI program directly supports the international effort to secure all vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years. GTRI supports DOE's Strategic Plan Goal to Reduce Global Nuclear Dangers by preventing terrorists from acquiring nuclear and radiological materials that could be used in WMD or acts of terrorism by: 1) Converting research reactors and isotope production facilities from the use of highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium, 2) Removing and disposing of excess nuclear and radiological materials, and 3) Protecting high-priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage. These three key aspects of GTRI—convert, remove, and protect—together provide a comprehensive approach to achieving its mission and denying terrorists access to nuclear and radiological materials.

Nuclear Counterterrorism Incident Response (NCTIR)._Strategically manages people with specialized expertise and equipment to provide a technically trained response to nuclear or radiological incidents worldwide, mitigates nuclear or radiological threats through research and development, and provides interagency training and support to the Nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism.

Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation Programs (CTCP)._Advances the U.S. Government counterterrorism and counterproliferation goals through innovative science, technology, and policy-driven solutions. The CTCP programs consolidate the Nuclear Counterterrorism subprogram from the NCTIR program and the National Security Applications program into an integrated program of technical work that materially contributes to the Department of Energy's goal of enhancing nuclear security through preventing nuclear terrorism.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0309–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 129 129 140
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 185 198 115
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 4 4 6
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1,457 1,573 1,376
25.5 Research and development contracts 13 13 151
31.0 Equipment 38 38 70
32.0 Land and structures 463 463 300
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 13 13 20



99.0 Direct obligations 2,302 2,432 2,179
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 11 1



99.9 Total new obligations 2,313 2,433 2,179

Cerro Grande Fire Activities

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0312–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 1 1 3
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 2



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 1 3 3
1930 Total budgetary resources available 1 3 3
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 1 3 3

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 13
3001 Adjustments to unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 13
3020 Outlays (gross) –11
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –2



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 13
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 13 13
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 13

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 11
4190 Outlays, net (total) 11

Cerro Grande Fire Activities._Emergency funding was provided in 2000 and 2001 for restoration activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico after the Cerro Grande Fire in May 2000.

Environmental and Other Defense Activities

Federal Funds

Defense Environmental Cleanup

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for atomic energy defense environmental cleanup activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of not to exceed one sport utility vehicle, three lube trucks, and one fire truck for replacement only, $4,853,909,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $280,784,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0251–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Closure Sites 5 5 5
0002 Hanford Site 949 956 922
0003 River Protection - Tank Farm 442 445 521
0004 River Protection - Waste Treatment Plant 740 744 690
0005 Idaho 384 388 362
0006 NNSA Sites 281 286 286
0007 Oak Ridge 198 200 194
0008 Savannah River 1,135 1,253 1,088
0009 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 213 215 204
0010 Program Support 19 24 18
0011 Safeguards & Security 251 253 235
0012 Technology Development & Demonstration 10 13 24
0013 Program Direction 320 330 281
0016 SPRU 24



0799 Total direct obligations 4,947 5,112 4,854
0801 Reimbursable program activity 1



0900 Total new obligations 4,947 5,112 4,855

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 19 80 15
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 5 12 12



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 24 92 27
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 5,023 5,034 4,854
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –1
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –20



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 5,002 5,034 4,854
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 1 1 1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 1 1 1
1900 Budget authority (total) 5,003 5,035 4,855
1930 Total budgetary resources available 5,027 5,127 4,882
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 80 15 27

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 2,633 1,891 1,850
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 4,947 5,112 4,855
3020 Outlays (gross) –5,683 –5,141 –4,922
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –5 –12 –12
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,891 1,850 1,771
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 2,633 1,891 1,850
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1,891 1,850 1,771

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 5,003 5,035 4,855
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 3,434 3,525 3,399
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 2,249 1,616 1,523



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 5,683 5,141 4,922
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4033 Non-Federal sources –1 –1 –1
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 5,002 5,034 4,854
4190 Outlays, net (total) 5,682 5,140 4,921

Summary of Budget Authority and Outlays (in millions of dollars)


2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Enacted/requested:
Budget Authority 5,002 5,034 4,854
Outlays 5,682 5,140 4,921
Legislative proposal, not subject to PAYGO:
Budget Authority 463
Outlays 463
Total:
Budget Authority 5,002 5,034 5,317
Outlays 5,682 5,140 5,384

The Defense Environmental Cleanup program is responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing waste at sites where the Department carried out defense-related nuclear research and production activities that resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination requiring remediation, stabilization, or some other type of cleanup action. The budget displays the cleanup program by site.

Closure Sites._Funds post-closure administration costs after physical completion.

Hanford Site._Funds the Hanford site cleanup and environmental restoration to protect the Columbia River. The Hanford site cleanup is managed by two Environmental Management (EM) site offices: the Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection.
The Richland Office is responsible for cleanup of most of the geographic area on the Hanford site. The Richland site projects are displayed in three separate control points (Central Plateau Remediation, River Corridor and Other Cleanup Operations, and Richland Community and Regulatory Support). The primary cleanup focus is the safe storage, treatment and disposal of Hanford's legacy wastes and environmental restoration. Risk to the public, workers, and the environment will be reduced by removing contamination before it migrates to the Columbia River.
The Office of River Protection on the Hanford site is responsible for the storage, retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of tank waste and the operation, maintenance, engineering, and construction activities in the 200 Area Tank Farms. Its budget has two components, the operation and maintenance of radioactive liquid waste tank farms and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant.

Idaho._Funds the Idaho Cleanup Project, which is aimed at reducing the risk of contamination reaching the Snake River Plain Aquifer from nuclear and hazardous waste buried or stored on-site. It also funds efforts to eliminate infrastructure costs by conducting cleanup operations to reduce the site "footprint"; and treat and dispose of the sodium bearing tank wastes, close tank farms, perform initial tank soils remediation work. The Idaho projects are displayed in two separate control points (Idaho Cleanup and Waste Disposition and Idaho Community and Regulatory Support).

NNSA Sites._Funds the safe and efficient cleanup of the environmental legacy at National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) sites including Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada National Security Site, Sandia, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Separations Process Research Unit. The cleanup strategy is a risk-informed approach that focuses first on those contaminant plumes and sources that are the greatest contributors to risk. The overall goal is first to ensure that risks to the public and workers are controlled, then to clean up soil and groundwater using a risk-informed methodology. NNSA is responsible for long-term stewardship of its sites after physical cleanup is completed.

Oak Ridge._Funds defense-related cleanup of the three facilities that make up the Oak Ridge Reservation: the East Tennessee Technology Park, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Y-12 Plant. The overall cleanup strategy is based on surface water considerations, encompassing five distinct watersheds that feed the Clinch River. Cleanup actions will contain that waste; improve on-site surface water quality to meet required standards; and protect off-site users of the Clinch River. The Oak Ridge projects are displayed in three separate control points (Oak Ridge Cleanup and Disposition, Oak Ridge Nuclear Facility D&D, and Oak Ridge Community and Regulatory Support).

Savannah River Site._Funds the safe stabilization, treatment, and disposition of legacy nuclear materials, spent nuclear fuel, and waste at the Savannah River site. The Savannah River projects are displayed in three separate control points (Radioactive Liquid Waste Stabilization and Disposition, Site Risk Management Operations, and Savannah River Community and Regulatory Support). The Savannah River cleanup strategy has four primary objectives: 1) eliminate the highest risks first through safe stabilization, treatment, and disposition of EM-owned nuclear materials, spent nuclear fuel, and waste; 2) significantly reduce costs of continuing operations and surveillance and maintenance; 3) decommission all EM-owned facilities; and 4) remediate groundwater and contaminated soils, using an area closure approach.

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant._Funds the world's first permitted deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste, and the Nation's only disposal site for defense-generated transuranic waste. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, managed by the Carlsbad Field Office, is an operating facility, supporting the cleanup of transuranic waste from waste generator and storage sites. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is crucial to the Department of Energy (DOE) completing its cleanup and closure mission.

Program Direction._Funds the Federal workforce responsible for the overall direction and administrative support of the EM program, including both Headquarters and field personnel.

Program Support._ Funds Headquarters policy and oversight activities including management and direction for various crosscutting EM and DOE initiatives; establishment and implementation of national and departmental policy; and analyses and integration activities across the DOE complex in a consistent, responsible, and efficient manner.

Safeguards and Security._Funds activities to protect against unauthorized access, theft, diversion, loss of custody or destruction of DOE assets and hostile acts that may cause adverse impacts on fundamental national security or the health and safety of DOE and contractor employees, the public or the environment.

Technology Development and Deployment._Funds projects to address the immediate, near- and long-term technology needs identified by the EM sites, enabling them to accelerate their cleanup schedules, treat orphaned wastes, improve worker safety, and provide technical foundations for the sites' end state visions. Specific focus is to mature and deploy the necessary technologies to accelerate tank waste processing, treatment, and waste loading.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0251–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 169 175 171
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 2
11.5 Other personnel compensation 2 2 7



11.9 Total personnel compensation 173 179 180
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 48 50 45
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 2 2 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 6 6 7
22.0 Transportation of things 1
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 9 9 10
23.2 Rental payments to others 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 4
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 96 99 117
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 1,661 1,717 1,505
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 42 43 47
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1,921 1,985 1,860
25.5 Research and development contracts 3 3 3
25.6 Medical care 2 2
26.0 Supplies and materials 3 3 2
31.0 Equipment 10 10 8
32.0 Land and structures 911 942 972
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 56 58 91



99.0 Direct obligations 4,946 5,111 4,854
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 4,947 5,112 4,855

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0251–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,526 1,435 1,398

Defense Environmental Cleanup

(Legislative proposal, not subject to PAYGO)

Contingent upon the enactment of legislation reauthorizing the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, $463,000,000, which shall be transferred to the "Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund".

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0251–2–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0014 UE D&D Fund Contribution 463



0900 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 463

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 463



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 463
1900 Budget authority (total) 463
1930 Total budgetary resources available 463

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 463
3020 Outlays (gross) –463

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 463
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 463
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 463
4190 Outlays, net (total) 463

Other Defense Activities

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses, necessary for atomic energy defense, other defense activities, and classified activities, in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, $749,080,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $127,035,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015, for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0243–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Health, safety and security 254 256 252
0015 Specialized security activities 193 190 196
0020 Legacy management 173 174 177
0030 Defense related administrative support 124 121 119
0050 Defense activities at INL 93 94
0060 Hearings and Appeals 4 5 5



0100 Subtotal, Direct program activities 841 840 749



0799 Total direct obligations 841 840 749
0810 Reimbursable program 1,687 1,749 1,700



0819 Reimbursable program activities, subtotal 1,687 1,749 1,700



0900 Total new obligations 2,528 2,589 2,449

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 25 16
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 4



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 29 16
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 823 828 749



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 823 828 749
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 1,745 1,745 1,745
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –52



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 1,693 1,745 1,745
1900 Budget authority (total) 2,516 2,573 2,494
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2,545 2,589 2,494
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1940 Unobligated balance expiring –1
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 16 45

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1,623 1,612 1,586
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 2,528 2,589 2,449
3020 Outlays (gross) –2,535 –2,615 –2,633
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –4



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,612 1,586 1,402
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –1,436 –1,384 –1,384
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 52



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –1,384 –1,384 –1,384
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 187 228 202
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 228 202 18

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 2,516 2,573 2,494
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1,278 1,411 1,360
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,257 1,204 1,273



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 2,535 2,615 2,633
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –1,696 –1,696 –1,696
4033 Non-Federal sources –49 –49 –49



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –1,745 –1,745 –1,745
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 52



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 823 828 749
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 790 870 888
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 823 828 749
4190 Outlays, net (total) 790 870 888

Health, Safety and Security._The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) supports the Secretary's mission-related objectives by strengthening the Department's health, safety, environment, and security programs to enhance productivity while maintaining the highest standards of safe operation, protection of national assets, and environmental sustainability. HSS functions include: policy and guidance development and technical assistance; analysis of health, safety, environment, and security performance; nuclear safety; domestic and international health studies; medical screening programs for former workers; Energy Employee Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act support; quality assurance programs; safety and security professional development and training; interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board; national security information programs; security for the Department's facilities and personnel in the National Capital Area; independent oversight of security, cyber security, emergency management, environment, safety, and health performance; and worker safety, nuclear safety, and classified information security enforcement programs.

Office of Specialized Security Activities._The program supports national security related analyses requiring highly specialized skills and capabilities.

Office of Legacy Management._The program supports long-term stewardship activities (e.g., groundwater monitoring, disposal cell maintenance, records management, and management of natural resources) at 92 sites where active remediation has been completed. In addition, Legacy Management funds the pensions and/or post-retirement benefits for 11,000 former contractor employees.

Office of Hearings and Appeals._The Office of Hearings and Appeals adjudicates personnel security cases, as well as whistleblower reprisal complaints filed by DOE contractor employees. The office is the appeal authority in various other areas, including Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act appeals. In addition, the office decides requests for exception from DOE orders, rules, regulations, and is responsible for the DOE's alternative dispute resolution function.

All Other._Obligations are included for defense-related administrative support. Idaho site-wide safeguards and security activities are requested in the Nuclear Energy account for 2014.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0243–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 106 99 97
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 3 3 4



11.9 Total personnel compensation 110 103 102
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 29 26 23
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 5 5 5
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 2 2 2
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 4 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 44 70 72
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 305 301 285
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 40 22 22
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 284 294 221
26.0 Supplies and materials 1 4 4
31.0 Equipment 11 5 5
32.0 Land and structures 2 3 3
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 3 3 3



99.0 Direct obligations 841 840 749
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1,687 1,749 1,700



99.9 Total new obligations 2,528 2,589 2,449

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0243–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 768 748 864
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 1 1 1

Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0244–0–1–053 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Repository Program 1



0900 Total new obligations (object class 99.5) 1

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 10 9 9
1930 Total budgetary resources available 10 9 9
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 9 9 9

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 31 20 1
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1
3020 Outlays (gross) –12 –19 –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 20 1
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 31 20 1
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 20 1

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 12 19 1
4190 Outlays, net (total) 12 19 1

In FY 2010, the Department closed the Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW). Related activities that were performed by RW are now being performed elsewhere in the Department.

Energy Programs

Federal Funds

Science

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for science activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and purchase of not more than 25 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, including one law enforcement vehicle, one ambulance, and one bus, $$5,152,752,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $$193,300,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Basic Energy Sciences 1,631 1,722 1,862
0002 Advanced Scientific Computing Research 429 445 466
0003 Biological and Environmental Research 593 616 625
0004 High Energy Physics 770 796 777
0005 Nuclear Physics 536 551 570
0006 Fusion Energy Sciences 394 404 458
0007 Science Laboratories Infrastructure 114 113 98
0008 Science Program Direction 186 192 193
0009 Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists 19 19 17
0010 Safeguards and Security 81 81 87
0011 Small Business Innovation Research 161 2
0012 Small Business Technology Transfer 23



0799 Total direct obligations 4,937 4,941 5,153
0801 Reimbursable program 564 599 610



0900 Total new obligations 5,501 5,540 5,763

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 38 43 6
1011 Unobligated balance transfer from other accts [89–0319] 2
1020 Adjustment of unobligated bal brought forward, Oct 1 –2
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 12



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 50 43 6
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 4,889 4,904 5,153
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0213] 10
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0321] 29
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0251] 1
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0309] 6
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0318] 3
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [89–0319] 11
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –15



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 4,934 4,904 5,153
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 583 599 610
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –23



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 560 599 610
1900 Budget authority (total) 5,494 5,503 5,763
1930 Total budgetary resources available 5,544 5,546 5,769
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 43 6 6

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 4,891 4,543 4,449
3001 Adjustments to unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 –1
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 5,501 5,540 5,763
3020 Outlays (gross) –5,835 –5,634 –5,958
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –12
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 4,543 4,449 4,254
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –473 –450 –450
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 23



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –450 –450 –450
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 4,417 4,093 3,999
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 4,093 3,999 3,804

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 5,494 5,503 5,763
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1,992 3,465 3,622
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 3,843 2,169 2,336



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 5,835 5,634 5,958
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –395 –319 –330
4033 Non-Federal sources –188 –280 –280



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –583 –599 –610
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 23



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 4,934 4,904 5,153
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 5,252 5,035 5,348
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 4,934 4,904 5,153
4190 Outlays, net (total) 5,252 5,035 5,348

Advanced Scientific Computing Research._This program supports advanced computational research, applied mathematics, computer science, and networking. The program also supports the development, maintenance, and operation of large high performance computing and network facilities including leadership computing facilities at the Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Energy Sciences Network. The request includes research, in partnership with other science programs, on the application of high performance computer simulation and modeling to science problems. Research will continue to focus on coordinated efforts to address the challenges for emerging computing hardware such as energy management and fault tolerance. Research will continue to address the challenges of data-intensive science including the massive quantities of data generated by Office of Science facilities and collaborations. ASCR efforts will consider and integrate the full spectrum of this challenge from hardware to applications.

Basic Energy Sciences._The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program supports fundamental research in material sciences, chemistry, geosciences, and aspects of biosciences to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. BES core research awards permit individual scientists and small groups to pursue discovery driven research interests with broad energy relevance. BES also supports two innovative approaches to integrated research: Energy Frontier Research Centers and Energy Innovation Hubs. The Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) support multi-year, multi-investigator scientific collaborations focused on overcoming hurdles in basic science that block transformational discoveries. The EFRCs portfolio will undergo an open re-competition in FY 2014 to select new EFRCs and consider renewal applications for existing EFRCs. The request includes funding for new EFRCs to replace some of the awards that will be completed. The Energy Innovation Hubs establish larger, highly integrated teams working to solve priority technology challenges.
The BES program operates large national user research facilities: a complementary set of intense x-ray sources, neutron scattering centers, electron beam characterization capabilities, and research centers for nanoscale science. These facilities probe materials in space, time, and energy at resolutions that can investigate the inner workings of matter to answer some of the most challenging grand science questions. The request includes support to utilize these state-of-the-art national user facilities at optimal levels. Research areas that will benefit from the facilities funding include materials sciences, chemical sciences, structural biology, and energy technology development. The request supports funding for construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Linac coherent Light Source-II at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

Biological and Environmental Research._This program addresses diverse and critical global challenges, from the sustainable and affordable production of renewable biofuels in an environmentally conscientious manner to the simulation and prediction of climate change and greenhouse gas emissions relevant to energy production. The science portfolio examines complex biological, climatic, and environmental systems across spatial and temporal scales ranging from sub-cellular to global, individual molecules to entire ecosystems, and nanoseconds to millennia. Multidisciplinary systems approaches are employed to study and predict dynamic biological interactions from the subcellular molecular level to large scale processes performed by complex plant and microbial communities. The program plays a vital role in supporting research examining atmospheric processes, climate change and its impacts, including warmer temperatures, changes in precipitation, increased levels of greenhouse gases, changing distributions of weather extremes on different ecosystems. The program also seeks understanding of the critical role that biogeochemical processes play in controlling the cycling and mobility of materials in the Earth's subsurface and across key surface-subsurface interfaces in the environment.
The budget continues support for key core research areas and scientific user facilities in bioenergy, climate, and environmental research. The Bioenergy Research Centers continue to address the fundamental science underpinning the development of cost-effective cellulosic biofuels. Genomic sciences investments target the development of synthetic biology tools and technologies and integrative analysis of experimental datasets to accelerate the interpretation of complex genomes that are sequenced and analyzed at the Joint Genome Institute. Observational research on clouds and aerosols at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will improve understanding of the priority climatic sensitive regions of the Arctic and tropics, and modeling efforts will shift their emphasis from global scale dynamics to higher resolution scale interactions for these priority regions. The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory enables experimental and computational research on physical, chemical, and biological processes to resolve molecular-scale challenges in areas such as atmospheric aerosols and trace gases, biofuel feedstocks, biogeochemistry subsurface science and energy materials.

Fusion Energy Sciences._The Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program focuses on developing the scientific basis for fusion energy. Burning plasma science, control of the plasma state required for attractive fusion energy, plasma-material interfaces, and harnessing fusion power are the four themes being addressed for the purposes of magnetic fusion research. FES supports the construction and development of the research program for ITER, an international experiment that will test many theories underpinning our understanding of burning plasmas magnetic fusion. An essential element of the FES program is the invention of advanced measurement techniques to ascertain the properties of plasma and its surroundings at the level required to test, challenge, and advance theoretical models. This validation forms the foundation of computational tools used to understand and predict the behavior of natural and human-made plasmas systems, including burning plasmas for fusion energy. FES funds the U.S. contributions to the ITER Project in collaboration with the European Union (EU), Japan, Russia, Korea, China, and India. FES supports two major domestic research facilities (DIII-D and the National Spherical Torus Experiment) to develop a more complete understanding of the physics of magnetically confined plasma and carry out research relevant to the success of ITER. The FES program also provides support for basic research in plasma science in partnership with the National Science Foundation; basic research in fusion science with university, private sector, and DOE laboratory engagement; and the study of high energy density laboratory plasmas.

High Energy Physics._The High Energy Physics (HEP) program aims to understand how our universe works at its most fundamental level by discovering the most elementary constituents of matter and energy, probing the interactions between them, and exploring the basic nature of space and time itself. The program encompasses both experimental and theoretical particle physics research at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers, as well as related advanced accelerator and detector technology research and development (R&D). The primary mode of experimental research involves the study of collisions of beams of intense and/or energetic particles using large particle accelerators or colliding beam facilities.
The HEP request supports Intensity Frontier research, primarily at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, including a diverse portfolio of experiments studying the fundamental properties of neutrinos, quarks and leptons, and searching for new forces and phenomena. The HEP request also supports the Energy Frontier Research program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), including support for software and computing, pre-operations, and maintenance of the U.S. built systems that are part of the LHC detectors and accelerator commissioning and accelerator physics studies using the LHC, and Cosmic Frontier program focused on discovering the nature of dark matter and dark energy using sensitive, state-of-the-art detectors underground, in space, and mounted on telescopes.
In addition to contributing to breakthrough scientific discoveries, HEP research also makes major contributions to accelerator technology development and provides the expertise necessary for the expansion of such technology into medicine, industry, and homeland security, as well as materials, biology, and chemistry research using light sources. To formally acknowledge this broader role in accelerator R&D stewardship, HEP submitted a strategic plan to Congress that outlines the HEP stewardship role and explains how input will be solicited from outside HEP and how HEP sponsored research would be applied to benefit other programs. The request includes support for an initial program of accelerator R&D stewardship.

Nuclear Physics._The Nuclear Physics (NP) program provides new insights into and advances understanding of the evolution and structure of nuclear matter. The program focuses on three broad but highly related research frontiers: strong interactions among quarks and gluons (quantum chromodynamics) and how they assemble into the various forms of matter; the structure of atomic nuclei at their limits of existence and nuclear astrophysics to address the origin of the elements and the evolution of the cosmos; and development of a new Standard Model of fundamental interactions and understanding of its implications for the origin of matter and the properties of neutrinos and nuclei. NP develops the scientific knowledge, technologies, and trained workforce needed to underpin DOE's applied missions. The advancement of knowledge of nuclear matter and its properties is intertwined with nuclear power, nuclear medicine, national security, environmental and geological sciences, and isotope production.
The request continues support of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory to characterize new states of matter and phenomena that occur in hot, dense nuclear matter; the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to understand the substructure of the nucleon; and the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System at Argonne National Laboratory for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. Construction continues on the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade project to double the electron beam energy at CEBAF, which will open the opportunity for new discoveries and an understanding of quark confinement. Efforts also continue for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University. The Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications program will continue to develop and produce commercial and research radioisotopes that are provided to medical institutions, universities, research organizations, and industry for a wide array of uses and applications.

Science Laboratories Infrastructure._The mission of this program is to support scientific and technological innovation at Office of Science (SC) laboratories by funding and sustaining mission-ready infrastructure and fostering safe and environmentally responsible operations. Revitalizing facilities and providing modern laboratory infrastructure is critical to ensuring the continued mission readiness of SC laboratories. The program provides the modern laboratory infrastructure necessary to support world leadership by the SC national laboratories in the area of basic scientific research now and in the future.

Safeguards and Security._The mission of this program is to support the Department's research at SC laboratories by ensuring appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access, theft, or destruction of Department assets, and hostile acts that may have adverse impacts on fundamental science, national security, the health and safety of DOE and contractor employees, the public, and the environment.

Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists._This program supports the annual National Science Bowl in Washington D.C., a middle-and high-school science competition that is the culmination of regional competitions held across the nation. This and other investments help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers to support the DOE mission, administer its programs, and conduct its research.

Program Direction._This program provides a highly skilled Federal workforce to develop and sustain world-class science programs that deliver the scientific discoveries and technological innovations needed to solve our nation's energy and environmental challenges and enable the U.S. to maintain its global competitiveness. The SC workforce is responsible for overseeing taxpayer dollars for science program development; program and project execution and management; managing the administrative, business, and technical aspects of research grants and contracts; overseeing 10 of the 17 DOE national laboratories; and providing public access to DOE's R&D results.


Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 105 107 111
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 2
11.5 Other personnel compensation 3 3 3



11.9 Total personnel compensation 110 112 116
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 29 30 31
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 3 3 4
22.0 Transportation of things 2
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1 1
23.2 Rental payments to others 2 2 2
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 4 4 5
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 9 10 9
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 67 67 70
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 14 14 15
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 3,008 3,135 3,243
25.5 Research and development contracts 200 191 186
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 2 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2 2
31.0 Equipment 288 379 418
32.0 Land and structures 369 306 363
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 829 680 686



99.0 Direct obligations 4,937 4,941 5,153
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 564 599 610



99.9 Total new obligations 5,501 5,540 5,763

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 974 989 1,010
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 1 1 1

Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy

For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities authorized by section 5012 of the America COMPETES Act (Public Law 110–69), as amended, $379,000,000 to remain available until expended: Provided, That $34,110,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0337–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 ARPA-E Projects 266 285 352
0002 Program Direction 31 22 34



0799 Total direct obligations 297 307 386
0801 Reimbursable program activity 3



0900 Total new obligations 297 310 386

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 178 159 126
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 275 277 379



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 275 277 379
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 3
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 3 –3



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 3
1900 Budget authority (total) 278 277 379
1930 Total budgetary resources available 456 436 505
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 159 126 119

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 4 266 332
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 297 310 386
3020 Outlays (gross) –35 –244 –376



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 266 332 342
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –3
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –3 3



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –3
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 4 263 332
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 263 332 342

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 278 277 379
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 23 69 95
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 12 175 281



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 35 244 376
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –3
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –3 3



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 275 277 379
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 35 241 376
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 275 277 379
4190 Outlays, net (total) 35 241 376

The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) within the Department of Energy was established by the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (Pub. L. No. 110–69), as amended. The mission of ARPA-E is to overcome the long-term and high-risk technological barriers to the development of new energy technologies that increase energy efficieny and reduce emissions, including green house gases.

ARPA-E will facilitate initiatives to enhance the energy and economic security of the United States through the development of new energy technologies and ensure that the United States maintains a technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies. ARPA-E will identify and promote revolutionary advances in energy-related applied sciences, translating scientific discoveries and cutting edge inventions into technological innovations. It will also accelerate transformational technological advances in areas where industry by itself is not likely to invest due to technical and financial uncertainty. The role of ARPA-E is not to duplicate DOE's basic research and applied programs but to focus on novel early-stage energy research and development with technology applications.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0337–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 7 7 7
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 2 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 9 9 9
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 1 2
23.2 Rental payments to others 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 16 8 20
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 2 2 1
25.5 Research and development contracts 266 285 352



99.0 Direct obligations 297 307 386
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 3



99.9 Total new obligations 297 310 386

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0337–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 25 40 44

Race to the Top for Energy Efficiency and Grid Modernization

For Department of Energy expenses necessary to promote policies at the State, local, or tribal level or by electric cooperatives intended to increase energy efficiency, increase clean distributed generation, and modernize the grid in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.) $200,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2018.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0220–0–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Grants to States 100



0900 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 100

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 200



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 200
1930 Total budgetary resources available 200
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 100

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 100
3020 Outlays (gross) –20



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 80
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 80

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 200
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 20
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 200
4190 Outlays, net (total) 20

Race to the Top for Energy Efficiency and Grid Modernization._The Budget includes $200 million in one-time funding for Race to the Top performance based awards to support state governments that implement effective policies to cut energy waste and modernize the grid. These awards will be modeled after a successful Administration approach in education reform designed to promote forward-leaning policies at the state-level. This approach will challenge states to pursue policy and regulatory reforms for key opportunities that include: modernizing utility regulations to encourage cost-effective investments in efficiency such as combined heat and power, clean distributed generation, and demand response resources; enhancing customer access to data; investments that improve the reliability, security and resilience of the grid; and enhancing information sharing regarding grid conditions.

Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund, Recovery Act

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0336–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 220 99 14
3020 Outlays (gross) –114 –85 –14
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –7



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 99 14
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 220 99 14
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 99 14

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 114 85 14
4190 Outlays, net (total) 114 85 14

Energy Supply and Conservation

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0224–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 12 13 13
1020 Adjustment of unobligated bal brought forward, Oct 1 2



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 14 13 13
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) –1
1930 Total budgetary resources available 13 13 13
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 13 13 13

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1 –4 –4
3020 Outlays (gross) –4
3030 Unpaid obligations transferred to other accts [89–0320] –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year –4 –4 –4
Uncollected payments:
3060 Obligated balance transferred to other accts –4 –3 –3
3070 Uncollected pymts from Fed sources transferred to other accounts 1



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –3 –3 –3
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year –3 –7 –7
3200 Obligated balance, end of year –7 –7 –7

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross –1
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 4
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 1
4190 Outlays, net (total) 4

Nuclear Energy

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for nuclear energy activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion $735,460,000, to remain available until expended, of which $24,000,000 shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund: Provided, That , of the amount made available under this heading, $87,500,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015, for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0319–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0032 Reactor Concepts RD&D 111 119 73
0041 Fuel Cycle R&D 178 190 165
0042 Integrated University Program 5 5
0043 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies R&D 73 75 62



0091 Research and Development programs, subtotal 367 389 300
0301 Radiological Facilities Management 70 70 5
0401 Idaho Facilities Management 154 155 182
0450 Idaho National Laboratory safeguards and security 94
0451 International Nuclear Safety 3



0491 Infrastructure programs, subtotal 157 155 276
0501 Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support Program 1 133 70
0551 Program Direction 84 95 88
0552 International Nuclear Energy Cooperation 3 3 3



0591 Other direct program activities, subtotal 88 231 161



0799 Total direct obligations 682 845 742
0801 Reimbursable program 113 73 70



0900 Total new obligations 795 918 812

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 10 93 16
1010 Unobligated balance transfer to other accts [89–0222] –2
1011 Unobligated balance transfer from other accts [72–0306] 4
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 3



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 15 93 16
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 769 771 711
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 24
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –11
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [72–0306] 4
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –3



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 759 771 735
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 102 70 70
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 12



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 114 70 70
1900 Budget authority (total) 873 841 805
1930 Total budgetary resources available 888 934 821
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 93 16 9

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 566 513 555
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 795 918 812
3020 Outlays (gross) –845 –876 –869
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –3



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 513 555 498
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –51 –63 –63
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –12



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –63 –63 –63
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 515 450 492
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 450 492 435

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 873 841 805
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 397 417 446
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 448 459 423



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 845 876 869
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –89 –70 –70
4033 Non-Federal sources –13



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –102 –70 –70
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –12



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 759 771 735
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 743 806 799
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 759 771 735
4190 Outlays, net (total) 743 806 799

The Office of Nuclear Energy funds a range of research and development activities as well as supports the Nation's nuclear facilities. The FY 2014 budget continues programmatic support for advanced reactor R&D activities; fuel cycle R&D, including R&D on storage, transportation, and disposal that supports the implementation of recommendations put forward by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future; and the safe, environmentally compliant, and cost-effective operation of the Department's facilities vital to nuclear energy R&D activities. The Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration program will support R&D focused on innovative small modular reactors, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and other advanced reactor concepts. The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies program will support R&D focused on a broad spectrum of nuclear energy issues that crosscut reactor types and fuel cycle issues, including materials, proliferation risk assessment, and advanced censors and instrumentation. The budget will also support cutting-edge nuclear technology R&D across the full spectrum of nuclear energy issues to inspire creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges. Consistent with the FY 2013 request, Safeguards and Security for Idaho National Laboratory, previously included within the Other Defense Activities appropriation, is requested within the Nuclear Energy appropriation. In addition, the Office of Nuclear Energy will continue to fund ongoing responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, including administration of the Nuclear Waste Fund and the Standard Contract, and will lead future waste management activities. Beginning in FY 2014 the Space and Defense Infrastructure subprogram, previously included within the Radiological Facilities Management program, is transitioning to a full cost recovery funding model and is included in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration budget request.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0319–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 44 55 47
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 46 57 49
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 13 16 14
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 8 10 9
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 45 56 48
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 10 12 11
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 522 647 570
26.0 Supplies and materials 1 1 1
31.0 Equipment 6 8 6
32.0 Land and structures 7 9 8
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 21 26 23



99.0 Direct obligations 682 845 742
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 113 73 70



99.9 Total new obligations 795 918 812

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0319–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 404 404 418

Nuclear Energy

(Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO)

In January 2013 the Administration released its Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste. This Strategy lays out a broad outline for a stable, integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of high-level nuclear waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. The Administration looks forward to working with Congress to build and implement this new program and believes that providing adequate and timely funding is critical to success.

Currently more than 68,000 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of used nuclear fuel are stored at 72 commercial power plants around the country with approximately 2,000 MTHM added to that amount every year. As a result of litigation by contract holders, the government was found in partial breach of contract, and is now liable for damages to some utilities to cover the costs of that on-site, at-reactor storage. For the first time, the FY 2014 Budget reflects a more complete estimate of those liability payments in the baseline. Please see additional discussion of the cost of the governments liability in the Budget Process chapter in the Analytical Perspectives volume.

To support the nuclear waste management program over the long term, reform of the current funding arrangement is necessary and the Administration believes the funding system should consist of the following elements: ongoing discretionary appropriations, access to annual fee collections provided in legislation either through their reclassification from mandatory to discretionary or as a direct mandatory appropriation, and eventual access to the balance or "corpus" of the Nuclear Waste Fund.

The FY 2014 Budget includes a proposal to implement such reform. Discretionary appropriations are included for this new program beginning in 2014 and continue for the duration of the effort. These funds would be used to fund expenses that are regular and recurring, such as program management costs, including administrative expenses, salaries and benefits, studies, and regulatory interactions. Mandatory appropriations in addition to the discretionary funding are proposed to be provided annually beginning in 2017 to fund the balance of the annual program costs.

The program envisioned in the FY 2014 Budget is a very long term, flexible, multi-faceted approach to dispose of the nations commercial and defense waste. The estimated programmatic cost of this effort over its first 10 years is approximately $5.6 billion. As part of this program, the Budget assumes the construction and operation of a pilot interim waste storage facility within the next 10 years as well as notable progress on both full-scale interim storage and long-term permanent geologic disposal. The deployment of pilot interim storage within the next 10 years allows the government to begin picking up waste, thus enabling the collection of one-time fees owed by certain generators that will offset some of this spending. Over the 10-year budget window, the projected net mandatory cost would be in the range of $1.3 billion.

The sooner that legislation enables progress on implementing a nuclear waste management program, the lower the ultimate cost will be to the taxpayers. This proposal is intended to limit, and then end, liability costs by making it possible for the government to begin performing on its contractual obligations.

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for electricity delivery and energy reliability activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, $169,015,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $27,615,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0318–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Research and development 106 100 119
0020 Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration 6 6 16
0030 Permitting, Siting, and Analysis 7 7 6
0040 Program Direction 24 27 28



0799 Total direct obligations 143 140 169
0801 Reimbursable work 1 1 1



0900 Total new obligations 144 141 170

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 20 20 21
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 4



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 24 20 21
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 140 140 169
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –3
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –1



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 136 140 169
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 1 1 1
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 3 1 1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 4 2 2
1900 Budget authority (total) 140 142 171
1930 Total budgetary resources available 164 162 192
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 20 21 22

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 2,823 1,516 866
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 144 141 170
3020 Outlays (gross) –1,438 –791 –749
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –4
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –9



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,516 866 287
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –1 –4 –5
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –3 –1 –1



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –4 –5 –6
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 2,822 1,512 861
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1,512 861 281

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 140 142 171
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 41 86 104
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 1,397 705 645



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 1,438 791 749
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –1 –1 –1
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –3 –1 –1



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 136 140 169
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 1,437 790 748
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 136 140 169
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1,437 790 748

The mission of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to drive electric grid modernization and reliability in energy infrastructure. OE leads the Department of Energy's efforts to ensure a resilient, reliable, and flexible electricity system through research, partnerships, facilitation, modeling and analytics, and emergency preparedness. OE programs include:

Clean Energy Transmission and Reliability (CETR)._The CETR program develops advanced modeling, monitoring, and control applications to improve the reliability and resiliency of the US transmission system.

Smart Grid.—The Smart Grid program targets modernization of the electric system at the distribution level. The program develops tools and applications with a goal of achieving a self-healing system for improved reliability and integration of demand-side management and improved system efficiency.

Electricity Systems Hub.—The Electricity Systems Hub, proposed in the Budget, will address the basic science, technology, economic, and policy issues that affect our ability to achieve a seamless and modernized grid.

Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery System (CEDS)._The CEDS program develops advanced cybersecurity technologies and capabilities to enhance the reliability and resiliency of the Nation's energy infrastructure by reducing the risk of energy disruptions due to cyber events.

Energy Storage.—The Energy Storage program conducts research, development, and demonstrations to enhance the stability, reliability, and flexibility of the electric grid by accelerating the development and deployment of advanced grid-scale energy storage in the electric system.

National Electricity Delivery (NED)._Formerly called Permitting, Siting, and Analysis, the NED program provides technical assistance to states, regional entities, and tribes to help them develop and improve their programs, policies, and laws that facilitate the development of reliable and affordable electricity infrastructure. The program implements the electricity grid modernization requirements contained in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and authorizes the export of electric energy and processes permits for the construction of transmission infrastructure across international borders.

Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER)._The ISER program leads efforts for securing the U.S. energy infrastructure against all hazards, reducing the impact of disruptive events, and responding to and facilitating recovery from energy disruptions, in collaboration with industry and State and local governments.

Program Direction._Program Direction provides for the costs associated with the federal workforce and contractor services that support OE's mission. These costs include salaries, benefits, travel, training, building occupancy, IT systems, and other related expenses.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0318–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 8 8 8
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 9 9 9
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 3 2 2
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 13 18 20
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 4 1 1
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 2 2 2
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 57 57 82
25.5 Research and development contracts 53 49 51
31.0 Equipment 1 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 143 140 169
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 144 141 170

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0318–0–1–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 75 75 75
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 5 5 5

Legacy Management

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0320–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1 1
3031 Unpaid obligations transferred from other accts [89–0224] 1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1 1 1
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1 1
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1 1 1

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, and other expenses necessary for energy efficiency and renewable energy activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, $2,775,700,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $185,000,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction: Provided further, That, of the amount provided under this heading, the Secretary may transfer up to $95,000,000 to the Defense Production Act Fund for activities of the Department of Energy pursuant to the Defense Production Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. App. 2061, et seq.).

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0321–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Hydrogen Technology 92 115 100
0002 Biomass and Biorefinery Systems R&D 129 277 282
0003 Solar Energy 233 378 357
0004 Wind Energy 73 115 144
0005 Geothermal Technology 34 42 60
0006 Water Power 49 69 55
0007 Vehicle Technologies 315 340 575
0008 Building Technologies 208 245 300
0009 Advanced Manufacturing 117 146 365
0010 Federal Energy Management Program 29 33 36
0011 Facilities & Infrastructure 26 26 46
0012 Weatherization & Intergovernmental Activities 126 145 248
0013 Program Direction & Support 187 204 221
0014 Congressionally Directed Projects 1 15



0799 Total direct obligations 1,619 2,150 2,789
0810 Reimbursable program 205 308 276



0900 Total new obligations 1,824 2,458 3,065

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 119 335
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 58 26 13



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 177 361 13
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 1,825 1,831 2,776
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –29
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –5
1131 Unobligated balance of appropriations permanently reduced –10 –10



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 1,781 1,821 2,776
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 191 276 276
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 10



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 201 276 276
1900 Budget authority (total) 1,982 2,097 3,052
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2,159 2,458 3,065
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 335

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 9,783 4,776 3,863
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1,824 2,458 3,065
3020 Outlays (gross) –6,689 –3,345 –3,097
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –58 –26 –13
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –84



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 4,776 3,863 3,818
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –143 –153 –153
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –10



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –153 –153 –153
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 9,640 4,623 3,710
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 4,623 3,710 3,665

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 1,982 2,097 3,052
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 514 776 1,025
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 6,175 2,569 2,072



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 6,689 3,345 3,097
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –117 –210 –210
4033 Non-Federal sources –74 –66 –66



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –191 –276 –276
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –10



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 1,781 1,821 2,776
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 6,498 3,069 2,821
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 1,781 1,821 2,776
4190 Outlays, net (total) 6,498 3,069 2,821

The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) supports clean energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities to advance the state-of-the-art in efficiency and renewable energy technologies and to transition them from early-stage research to the private sector. EERE programs accelerate the development and commercialization of new generations of energy technologies for buildings, factories, and vehicles that are clean, reliable, efficient, and affordable and that help the country meet its economic, environmental, and energy security goals. These technologies can provide the basis for increased domestic manufacturing and economic growth; protect the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving air and water quality; reduce petroleum use; increase diversity and choice in energy sources and services; and decrease energy use and costs for consumers. As EERE technologies become more cost competitive, grid integration issues associated with higher penetration of EERE technologies on the power grid (such as variable renewable electricity generation, electric vehicle charging, building efficiency, demand response, etc.) emerge as a high priority barrier to address.

EERE programs include:

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies._This program aims to reduce petroleum use, greenhouse gas emissions, and criteria air pollutants, and to contribute to a more diverse and efficient energy infrastructure by supporting the development of affordable, high efficiency and low emissions hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for widespread commercialization. The program supports applied research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) of transformative advances in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as efforts to overcome economic and institutional barriers to their commercial deployment.

Biomass and Biorefinery Systems._This program funds research, development, and demonstration projects to advance biofuels technologies and to validate and assist in the commercialization of integrated biorefinery technologies that will help transform the nation's transportation sector. The program's activities include the development of biomass conversion technologies to produce a variety of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. The program also works to evaluate environmentally sustainable feedstocks and to develop economically viable feedstock logistics systems to sustainably supply the biofuels industry. With the completion of the program's technology development for cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol, the program is now partnering with the private sector to demonstrate economic viability at larger scales. It is also developing follow-on technology for more infrastructure-compatible biofuels, such as bio-based gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. This work is coordinated closely with other agencies such as the Agriculture and Defense Departments.

Solar Energy._This program's main objective under the SunShot Initiative is to make solar energy cost-competitive with other sources of electricity, across the nation and without subsidies, by 2020—a goal of approximately 5–6 cents per kWh for installed systems. To achieve this objective, the program supports solar energy research, development, and demonstration at universities and the national laboratories and in collaboration with industry and industry-led consortia. The Photovoltaic (PV) and Innovations in Manufacturing R&D subprograms focus on lowering the cost of PV through increased conversion efficiency, reduction in cell and module costs, and manufacturing technology improvements and on increasing the competitiveness of the U.S. solar energy manufacturing industry and supply chain. The Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) subprogram supports the development of thermal storage, heat transfer fluids, and component and systems research and optimization to enable CSP to provide baseload power on demand. Additionally, the Systems Integration and Soft Balance of Systems Cost Reduction subprograms support cost goals for the deployment of solar technologies by addressing grid integration issues, the balance-of-system and non-hardware costs of installation, and other market barriers.

Wind Energy._This program develops technology in partnership with industry to improve the reliability and affordability of land-based and offshore wind energy systems, with an increased focus on next generation technologies (e.g., floating platform designs, etc.) that will enable America's sizable offshore wind resources to be captured at a competitive price. The program also supports advanced turbine component research and design, wind resource assessments and modeling, advanced turbine and system modeling and optimization of entire wind plants, and improved approaches to systems interconnection and integration with the electric transmission grid. These efforts also help reduce barriers to technology acceptance and enable increased market penetration of this variable resource.

Geothermal Technologies._This program conducts research, development and demonstration in partnership with industry, academia, and the national laboratories to improve the discovery of new geothermal resources and to develop innovative methods for accessing and using those resources for cost-effective baseload renewable electricity generation. The program's geothermal work will concentrate on improved exploration technologies and on developing new technologies for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that offer the potential for tapping into enormous geothermal resources across America. The program's new EGS field test laboratory will enable transformative, high-impact technologies and techniques to be tested and improved and will increase technology sharing and leverage with the private sector.

Water Power._This program conducts research, development, and validation testing and demonstration of innovative water power technologies to enable improved, cost-effective, and environmentally responsible renewable power generation from water. The program focuses primarily on a diverse array of marine and hydrokinetic technologies for producing electricity from waves, tides, and currents in oceans and rivers. It also focuses on advanced hydropower technologies and tools that significantly improve energy and environmental performance. In addition, the program supports resource assessments, cost assessments, environmental studies, and advanced modeling aimed at determining and demonstrating the viability of emerging water power technologies and reducing the market barriers to their deployment.

Vehicle Technologies._This program's research and development (R&D) seeks technology breakthroughs that will enable the U.S. to greatly reduce transportation petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions while reducing the costs of vehicle operation. To accomplish this, the program focuses on a suite of technologies from transportation electrification to lightweight materials, advanced combustion engines, and non-petroleum fuels and lubricant technologies. The program incorporates a DOE grand challenge, the EV Everywhere Initiative, to develop the technologies to make electric-powered vehicles as affordable and convenient as gasoline-powered vehicles for the average American family by 2020. The EV Everywhere Initiative will include accelerated R&D on emerging battery technologies and innovative battery manufacturing processes, power electronics, and electric motors. The program also supports early demonstration, field validation, and community-scale deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, as well as efforts to reduce the vehicle miles traveled by the public.

Building Technologies._In partnership with the buildings industry, this program develops, demonstrates, and integrates energy technologies and practices to make buildings more efficient and affordable. The program accelerates the availability of innovative, highly efficient building technologies and practices through R&D; increases the minimum efficiency of buildings and equipment through the promotion of model building efficiency codes and the promulgation of national lighting and appliance standards; and encourages the use of energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies and practices in residential and commercial buildings through integration activities such as Better Buildings, Building America, and the ENERGY STAR partnership with EPA. As part of its activities, the program oversees the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub.

Advanced Manufacturing._This program supports RD&D focused on high-impact energy-efficient manufacturing processes and materials technologies. The program is accelerating its activities to develop cross-cutting manufacturing process technologies and advanced industrial materials that will enable U.S. companies to cut the costs of manufacturing by using less energy while improving product quality and accelerating product development. These activities include one or more Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institutes as part of a larger proposed interagency network aimed at bringing together universities, companies, and the government to co-invest in solving industry-relevant manufacturing challenges. The program seeks to demonstrate materials and processes at a convincing scale to prove reductions in energy intensity and in the life-cycle energy consumption of manufactured products, plus promote a corporate culture of continuous improvement in energy efficiency among existing facilities and manufacturers. The program also manages the Energy Innovation Hub on Critical Materials.

Federal Energy Management Program._This program enables the Federal Government to meet its relevant energy, water, greenhouse gas, and transportation goals as defined in existing legislation and Executive Orders by providing interagency coordination, technical expertise, training, financing resources, and contracting support. FEMP also assists agencies in implementing and monitoring performance-based contracting to improve the efficiency of Federal buildings.

Strategic Programs._The mission of the Office of Strategic Programs (OSP) is to increase the effectiveness and impact of all EERE activities by funding cross-cutting activities, analysis, and support functions. The office conducts sector analyses, feasibility studies, and evaluations to characterize technology cost and performance, understand market trends, estimate impacts, and complete long-term strategic planning. Strategic Programs also supports technology-to-market activities that accelerate the commercialization of innovative clean energy technologies, coordinates EERE communication and outreach to consumers and other stakeholders on the progress and benefits of clean energy development, and assists in catalyzing international markets for clean energy solutions and U.S. export opportunities.

Facilities and Infrastructure._This activity sustains RD&D infrastructure and supports EERE's clean energy RD&D by providing funding for general plant projects, maintenance and repair, general purpose equipment, upgrades to accommodate new research requirements, and safeguards and security operations at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Facilities and Infrastructure will also support the operation of the NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility as a DOE Technology User Facility. This new facility will provide component and system testing and grid simulation capability to DOE programs and the private sector, to help integrate clean energy technologies seamlessly into electrical grid infrastructure and utility operations at the speed and scale required to meet national goals.

Weatherization and Intergovernmental._This program supports clean energy deployment in partnership with State, local, U.S. territory, and tribal governments. The State Energy Program provides technical and financial resources to States to help them achieve their energy efficiency and renewable energy goals through interactions with utilities and through building codes and other local policies. Funding also supports energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet local needs. The Tribal Energy Program supports feasibility assessments and the development of implementation plans for clean energy projects on Tribal lands. The Weatherization Assistance Program lowers energy use and costs for low income families by supporting energy-efficient home retrofits through State-managed networks of local weatherization providers.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0321–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 71 71 81
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 4 4 4
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 76 76 86
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 23 31 40
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 4 5 7
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 3 4
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 93 125 163
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 76 102 133
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 27 36 47
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 717 964 1,256
25.5 Research and development contracts 189 254 331
31.0 Equipment 2 3 4
32.0 Land and structures 1 1 1
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 409 550 717



99.0 Direct obligations 1,619 2,150 2,789
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 205 308 276



99.9 Total new obligations 1,824 2,458 3,065

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0321–0–1–270 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 703 735 770

Home Energy Retrofit Rebate Program

Home Energy Retrofit Rebate Program

(Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0341–4–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Grants for rebates 300



0900 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 300

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, mandatory:
1200 Appropriation 6,000



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 6,000
1930 Total budgetary resources available 6,000
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 5,700

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 300
3020 Outlays (gross) –300

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 6,000
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 300
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 6,000
4190 Outlays, net (total) 300

HomeStar._The HomeStar program is a legislative proposal for mandatory funding to provide consumers incentives to make their homes more energy efficient. It will create jobs by encouraging Americans to invest in energy saving home improvements. The HomeStar program will provide direct rebates to consumers at the point of sale, through vendors who would be reimbursed by the Federal government, for both individual energy efficiency upgrades and whole home energy improvement projects. It also will include funding for State and local governments to provide financing options for consumers seeking to make efficiency investments.

Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup

For Department of Energy expenses, including the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for non-defense environmental cleanup activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, $212,956,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0315–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0002 Fast Flux Test Facility 3 3 3
0003 Gaseous Diffusion Plants 100 101 96
0004 Small Sites 59 79 50
0005 West Valley Demonstration Project 65 65 64



0799 Total direct obligations 227 248 213
0801 Reimbursable program 26 28 28



0900 Total new obligations 253 276 241

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 1 11
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 2 11
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 New budget authority (gross), detail 236 237 213



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 236 237 213
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 27 26 27
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –1 2 1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 26 28 28
1900 Budget authority (total) 262 265 241
1930 Total budgetary resources available 264 276 241
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 11

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Obligated balances, start of year 202 121 100
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 253 276 241
3020 Outlays (gross) –333 –297 –248
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 121 100 93
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –4 –3 –5
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 1 –2 –1



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –3 –5 –6
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 198 118 95
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 118 95 87

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 262 265 241
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays (gross), detail 163 194 177
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 168 103 71



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 331 297 248
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –3 –1 –1
4033 Non-Federal sources –24 –25 –26



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –27 –26 –27
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 1 –2 –1



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 236 237 213
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 304 271 221
Mandatory:
Outlays, gross:
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 2
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 236 237 213
4190 Outlays, net (total) 306 271 221

The Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup program includes funds to manage and clean up sites used for civilian energy research and non-defense related activities. Past activities related to nuclear energy research and development resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination that requires remediation, stabilization, or some other type of action. The budget displays the cleanup program by site.

West Valley Demonstration Project._Funds waste disposition, building decontamination, and removal of non-essential facilities in the near-term. As a result of the Environmental Impact Statement (completed in January 2010), a Record of Decision to proceed with "Phased Decommissioning" was issued in April 2010.

Gaseous Diffusion Plants._Funds surveillance and maintenance of the former Uranium Program facilities and manages legacy polychlorinated biphenyl contamination. Also included is the operation of two depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert the depleted uranium hexafluoride into a more stable form for reuse or disposition.

Fast Flux Test Facility._Funds the long-term surveillance and maintenance and eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, constructed and operated from the 1960s through 1980s.

Small Sites._Funds cleanup, closure, and post-closure environmental activities at a number of geographic sites across the Nation, including Brookhaven National Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, Moab, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), as well as non-defense activities at Idaho. Some sites are associated with other Department of Energy programs, particularly the Office of Science, and will have continuing missions after EM completes the cleanup. Others will transition to the Office of Legacy Management or private sector entities for post-closure activities. Brookhaven and SLAC transfer back to Office of Science in FY 2014.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0315–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 206 225 193
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 1 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 17 19 16
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 227 248 213
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 26 28 28



99.9 Total new obligations 253 276 241

Fossil Energy Research and Development

For necessary expenses in carrying out fossil energy research and development activities, under the authority of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95–91), including the acquisition of interest, including defeasible and equitable interests in any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition or expansion, and for conducting inquiries, technological investigations and research concerning the extraction, processing, use, and disposal of mineral substances without objectionable social and environmental costs (30 U.S.C. 3, 1602, and 1603), $420,575,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $115,753,000 shall be available until September 30, 2015 for program direction: Provided further, That for all programs funded under Fossil Energy appropriations in this Act or any other Act, the Secretary may vest fee title or other property interests acquired under projects in any entity, including the United States.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0002 Carbon Capture 67 69 112
0003 Carbon Storage 112 115 61
0004 Advanced Energy Systems 97 101 48
0005 Cross-Cutting Research 48 48 21
0012 Program Direction - Management 123 123 116
0013 Program Direction - NETL R&D 35 35 35
0014 Plant and Capital Equipment 17 17 13
0016 Environmental Restoration 7 8 6
0017 Special Recruitment Program 1 1 1
0020 Natural gas technologies 15 15 17
0021 Unconventional FE Technologies 5 5



0799 Total direct obligations 527 537 430
0801 Reimbursable program 8 8 8



0900 Total new obligations 535 545 438

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 35 29
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 190 13 9



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 225 42 9
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 534 537 421
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [89–0222] –10
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –13
1131 Unobligated balance of appropriations permanently reduced –187 –29



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 337 495 421
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 4 8 8
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –2



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 2 8 8
1900 Budget authority (total) 339 503 429
1930 Total budgetary resources available 564 545 438
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 29

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 4,444 3,586 2,468
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 535 545 438
3020 Outlays (gross) –1,051 –1,650 –1,698
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –190 –13 –9
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –152



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 3,586 2,468 1,199
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –4 –2 –2
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 2



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –2 –2 –2
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 4,440 3,584 2,466
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 3,584 2,466 1,197

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 339 503 429
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 144 201 171
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 907 1,449 1,527



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 1,051 1,650 1,698
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –1 –6 –6
4033 Non-Federal sources –3 –2 –2



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –4 –8 –8
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 2



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 337 495 421
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 1,047 1,642 1,690
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 337 495 421
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1,047 1,642 1,690

The Fossil Energy Research and Development program supports high-priority, high-risk research that will improve the Nation's ability to use fossil energy resources cleanly, affordably, and efficiently. The program funds research and development with academia, national laboratories, and the private sector to advance the technology base used to develop new products and processes. Fossil Energy R&D supports activities ranging from early concept research in universities and national laboratories to applied R&D and proof-of-concept projects with private-sector firms.

Research, Development & Demonstration._Program activities, including NETL in-house R&D, focus on: 1) CO2 capture technology applicable to both new and existing fossil-fueled facilities; 2) CO2 storage, with emphasis on modeling, simulation, and CO2 monitoring, verification and accounting; 3) advanced coal-fueled power systems that support carbon capture and storage (CCS), including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and oxy-combustion technologies; and 4) cross-cutting research to bridge fundamental science and applied engineering development. The Department will continue to work with the private sector and academia to conduct and direct research toward overcoming critical challenges to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy power generation in the United States, as well as with the Department of the Interior and the Environmental Protection Agency to ensure that hydraulic fracturing for natural gas development is conducted in a manner that is environmentally sound and protective of human health and safety. Also, methane hydrates R&D activities will continue to advance our understanding of naturally-occurring gas hydrates.

Program Direction and Management Support._The program provides the funding for all headquarters and field personnel and operational expenses in Fossil Energy R&D. In addition, it provides support for day-to-day project management functions. Also included is the Import/Export Authorization program, which will continue regulatory reviews and oversight of the transmission of natural gas across the U.S. borders.

Environmental Restoration._The program provides the funding for environmental cleanup of former and present Fossil Energy project sites, security and safeguard services for NETL, and health, safety, and environmental protection programs at NETL.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 57 65 65
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 59 68 68
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 17 10 10
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 1 1
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
23.2 Rental payments to others 2 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 3 6 4
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 114 35 35
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 20 20 20
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 9 5 5
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 61 51 47
25.5 Research and development contracts 231 321 220
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 2 3 1
26.0 Supplies and materials 2 2 2
31.0 Equipment 5 2 5
32.0 Land and structures 2 7 7
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 2 2



99.0 Direct obligations 527 537 430
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 8 8 8



99.9 Total new obligations 535 545 438

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 570 680 675

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

For expenses necessary to carry out naval petroleum and oil shale reserve activities, $20,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, unobligated funds remaining from prior years shall be available for all naval petroleum and oil shale reserve activities.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Production and Operations 8 8 13
0002 Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Program Direction 8 7 7



0900 Total new obligations 16 15 20

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 2 3 3
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 2



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 4 3 3
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 15 15 20



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 15 15 20
1930 Total budgetary resources available 19 18 23
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 3 3 3

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 27 22 13
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 16 15 20
3020 Outlays (gross) –19 –24 –27
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –2



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 22 13 6
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 27 22 13
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 22 13 6

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 15 15 20
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 5 9 12
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 14 15 15



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 19 24 27
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 15 15 20
4190 Outlays, net (total) 19 24 27

Following the sale of the government's interests in Naval Petroleum Reserve 1 (NPR-1) (Elk Hills) mandated by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104–106), post-sale activities required by legally binding agreements involve the environmental cleanup/remediation under the Corrective Action Consent Agreement with the State of California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). Program activities encompass execution of a technical baseline, interim measures, environmental sampling and analysis, corrective measures, waste removal and disposal, confirmatory sampling,and requests to DTSC for release from further corrective actions.

The account also funds activities at the Naval Petroleum Reserve 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming (Teapot Dome field), a stripper well oil field. Disposition of NPR-3 will be the primary focus. NPR-3 will continue implementing the approved disposition plan. A competitive sale will be conducted in late FY 2014 with final disposition of the property estimated to occur in FY 2015. NPR-3 will be utilized for production and testing operations in order to retain asset value during preparation to transfer to new ownership. Production facilities will remain operational as long as economic, until date of transfer. The program will continue Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) testing for 100 percent funds-in projects until date of transfer. Environmental remediation of NPR-3 facilities will continue to facilitate the sale/disposition of the property in a manner consistent with the approved property disposition plan.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 1 2 2
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 5 4 5
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 7 7 10
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1 1 2
26.0 Supplies and materials 1



99.9 Total new obligations 16 15 20

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 13 20 12

Strategic Petroleum Reserve

For necessary expenses for Strategic Petroleum Reserve facility development and operations and program management activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), $189,400,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 SPR Management 20 22 24
0002 SPR Storage Facilities Development 174 172 165



0900 Total new obligations 194 194 189

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 6 12 12
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 7



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 13 12 12
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 193 194 189



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 193 194 189
1930 Total budgetary resources available 206 206 201
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 12 12 12

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 147 112 105
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 194 194 189
3020 Outlays (gross) –222 –201 –184
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –7



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 112 105 110
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 147 112 105
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 112 105 110

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 193 194 189
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 96 107 104
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 126 94 80



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 222 201 184
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 193 194 189
4190 Outlays, net (total) 222 201 184

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program has the national security mission to reduce the vulnerability of the United States to energy supply disruptions by maintaining a crude oil stockpile capable of rapid deployment at the direction of the President. This program protects the United States against foreign and domestic disruptions in its critical petroleum supplies that would result from international incidents, hurricanes or terrorism, and fulfills the United States obligations under the International Energy Program. The International Energy Program (the charter of the International Energy Agency) avails the United States to worldwide emergency assistance through its International Energy Agency alliance in the event of a petroleum supply disruption.

This account provides for the operations, maintenance and security of the SPR storage facilities, drawdown testing and readiness of the Reserve, and program administration. The FY 2014 budget continues to provide further insurance against oil supply disruptions that could harm the U.S. economy by pursuing a SPR program that is environmentally responsible and fully responsive to the needs of the Nation and the public. The FY 2014 budget funds the resumption of degasification operations at West Hackberry site to begin the process of treating oil to safe vapor presure levels to ensure the availability of crude oil inventories at SPR sites within environmental and safety constraints; provides for the capacity maintenance program to regain cavern volume lost to geologically induced cavern creep and continues a cavern casing inspection and remediation program to comply with state regulations.

The key measure of program performance is expressed as capability to comply with Level 1 Technical and Performance Criteria. These criteria are specifically engineered performance and reliability standards applied to critical inventory storage, drawdown, and delivery systems required for drawing down and delivering crude oil inventory.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 11 10 10
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 3 3 3
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1 1
23.2 Rental payments to others 2 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 4 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 31 47 47
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 142 130 125



99.9 Total new obligations 194 194 189

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 107 123 123

SPR Petroleum Account

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0233–0–1–274 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 3,243 2,743 2,243
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –500



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) –500
Appropriations, mandatory:
1230 Appropriations and/or unobligated balance of appropriations permanently reduced –500



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) –500
1900 Budget authority (total) –500 –500
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2,743 2,243 2,243
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 2,743 2,243 2,243

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 25 19 19
3020 Outlays (gross) –6



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 19 19 19
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 25 19 19
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 19 19 19

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross –500
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 6
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross –500
4180 Budget authority, net (total) –500 –500
4190 Outlays, net (total) 6

No funding is requested for FY 2014.

Energy Information Administration

For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of the Energy Information Administration, $117,000,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Obligations by Program Activity 106 106 117

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 1
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Discretionary: 105 106 117



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 105 106 117
1930 Total budgetary resources available 106 106 117

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Change in obligated balances 18 28 40
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 106 106 117
3020 Outlays (gross) –95 –94 –109
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 28 40 48
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 18 28 40
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 28 40 48

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 105 106 117
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 78 74 82
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 17 20 27



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 95 94 109
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 105 106 117
4190 Outlays, net (total) 95 94 109

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. EIA conducts a data collection program with the goal of covering the full spectrum of energy sources, end uses, and energy flows; generates short- and long-term domestic and international energy projections; and performs informative energy analyses. The work of EIA is to further understanding of the energy complex and its interactions with the economy and the environment using state- of- the- art analytical tools and the most comprehensive and timely data available for both supply and demand. Given that the data products, analyses, reports, and services are primarily disseminated to customers and stakeholders through its website, EIA endeavors to provide continuous improvement for users with an emphasis on enabling access to desired information including data in a format and structure usable with minimal additional effort. Priority areas include restoring important electricity trade data collection and adding collection of monthly oil production data; restoring energy modeling and enhancing international, short-term, end-use efficiency, and refinery analytic capabilities; improving the analysis of energy market behavior, the interrelationship of energy and financial markets, and the analysis of refined product markets; revitalizing the energy consumption data program to enhance understanding of energy use and provide benchmarking and performance measurement of energy efficiency programs; modernizing the systems and tools used to produce EIA's weekly petroleum and natural gas statistical reports, on which industry and market participants heavily rely; leveraging technology to more efficiently manage data collection and processing across the agency; and enhancing customer access and usability of EIA's information by developing more integrated and interactive dissemination platforms.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 38 40 40
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 1 1 1
11.5 Other personnel compensation 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 39 42 42
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 11 11 11
25.1 Consulting services - non-Government contracts 34 35 45
25.3 Purchases of goods and services from Government accounts 10 9 10
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 5 5 5
26.0 Supplies and materials 1 1 1
31.0 Equipment 5 3 3



99.9 Total new obligations 106 106 117

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 352 350 350

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

salaries and expenses

For necessary expenses of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to carry out the provisions of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and official reception and representation expenses not to exceed $3,000, $304,600,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, not to exceed $304,600,000 of revenues from fees and annual charges, and other services and collections in fiscal year 2014 shall be retained and used for necessary expenses in this account, and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That the sum herein appropriated from the general fund shall be reduced as revenues are received during fiscal year 2014 so as to result in a final fiscal year 2014 appropriation from the general fund estimated at not more than $0.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0801 Just and Reasonable Rates, Terms & Conditions 164 167 166
0802 Infrastructure 141 139 139



0900 Total new obligations 305 306 305

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 20 21 20
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 21 21 20
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 305 305 305



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 305 305 305
1930 Total budgetary resources available 326 326 325
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 21 20 20

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 33 36 37
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 305 306 305
3020 Outlays (gross) –301 –305 –332
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 36 37 10
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 33 36 37
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 36 37 10

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 305 305 305
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 260 275 275
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 41 30 57



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 301 305 332
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4034 Offsetting governmental collections –305 –305 –305
4190 Outlays, net (total) –4 27

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) regulates and oversees key interstate aspects of the electric power, natural gas and oil pipeline and hydropower industries. The Commission assists consumers in obtaining reliable, efficient and sustainable energy services at a reasonable cost through appropriate regulatory and market means. Regulated businesses pay fees and charges sufficient to recover the Commission's full cost of operations.

Just and Reasonable Rates, Terms and Conditions._One of the Commission's fundamental statutory responsibilities is to ensure that rates, terms and conditions for wholesale sales and transmission of electric energy and for transportation of natural gas are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. The Commission uses a combination of regulatory and market means to achieve this goal, consistent with national policy and priorities. The Commission approves cost-based, and where appropriate, market-based rates for the interstate transportation of natural gas and oil on jurisdictional pipelines, and for the interstate transmission and wholesale sales of electric energy. The Commission accepts tariff provisions, as appropriate, to allow natural gas and oil pipelines and public utilities to modify their services to meet their customers' needs. The organized wholesale electric markets illustrate the Commission's use of regulatory and market means. Improving the competitiveness of these markets encourages new entry by supply-side and demand-side resources, spurs innovation and deployment of new technologies, improves operating performance, and exerts downward pressure on costs. Notable benefits also stem from more broadly diversifying the fuels used to generate electricity. The Commission will continue to pursue market reforms to allow all resources, including renewable energy resources, to compete in jurisdictional markets on a level playing field. These efforts could include amendments to market rules, the modification of ancillary services and related policies, or the implementation of operational tools that support the reliable integration of renewable resources. The Commission will continue its efforts to identify and eliminate barriers to participation by demand resources in organized wholesale electric markets. The Commission also is implementing policies which reform compensation mechanisms for demand response resources in organized wholesale electric markets. The provision of ancillary services is critical to the reliable operation of the interstate electric transmission grid. To build on earlier reforms, the Commission is instituting formal proceedings to determine whether the modification of ancillary services is necessary to support the provision of transmission service on terms and conditions that are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. The development of RTOs and ISOs and modified market structures was aimed at increasing the efficiency of wholesale electric market operations and increasing non-discriminatory access to the transmission grid. To measure these benefits, the Commission worked with RTO and ISO staff, stakeholders, and other experts to develop operational and financial metrics for RTOs and ISOs. The Commission collected and analyzed the historic data for these metrics to measure performance on three dimensions: market benefits, organizational effectiveness, and reliability. The Commission engaged in a similar process with a diverse group of utilities in regions outside RTO and ISO markets to develop comparable operational and financial performance metrics. Participating utilities have submitted performance data on these metrics, which staff is analyzing. The Commission will establish appropriate common metrics between the two groups, refining the metrics as necessary. The final product will be a report that compares the results of the non-RTO/ISO performance metrics with performance data provided by RTOs and ISOs. Oversight and enforcement are essential complements to the Commission's approach to ensure that rates, terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. The Commission will review internal compliance programs as part of its compliance audits, issue publicly available audit reports, and engage in formal and informal outreach efforts to promote effective compliance programs. Audits are planned and prioritized using a risk-based approach in order to maximize the impact of the Commission's resources. The Commission also uses its oversight authority to prevent the accumulation and exercise of market power by reviewing mergers and other corporate filings to ensure that mergers and consolidations will not harm the public interest.

Infrastructure._The Commission plays an important role in the development of a strong and secure energy infrastructure that operates efficiently, safely and reliably. In addition, the Commission will provide leadership, expertise and assistance in identifying, communicating and seeking comprehensive solutions to significant potential cyber and physical security risks to the energy infrastructure under the Commission's jurisdiction. One aspect of the Commission's role in energy infrastructure development stems from siting authority that includes licensing non-federal hydropower projects, certificating interstate natural gas pipelines and storage projects, authorizing liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities, and, in certain circumstances, permitting electric transmission lines. Throughout all of these processes, the Commission's goal is to expedite application processing without compromising environmental responsibilities or public participation. The Commission encourages, and sometimes requires, project proponents to engage in early involvement with state and federal agencies, Indian tribes, affected landowners and the public. The Commission will support the deployment of smart grid applications in the electric grid by reviewing and adopting, as appropriate, standards and protocols developed through the process coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. In addition, the Commission will implement rate treatment policies that support investments in smart grid technologies where appropriate. The Commission also evaluates requests for incentive rate treatments on a case-by-case basis, in an effort to encourage development of the Nation's transmission infrastructure. Although ownership of the interstate electric transmission grid is highly disaggregated, with more than 500 owners, transmission planning to meet reliability and economic needs, as well as transmission needs driven by public policy requirements, must be considered not only on a local basis, but also on a regional basis. The Commission therefore requires transmission providers to participate in an open and transparent regional transmission planning process that aims to improve the coordination of transmission planning among utilities. The Commission issued new policies to reform regional transmission planning and cost allocation for new transmission facilities and public utilities have submitted filings to comply with these new requirements. The Commission is monitoring implementation of these new policies. The Commission is responsible for the safety of LNG and non-federal hydropower facilities throughout the entire life cycle of a project: design review, construction and operation. To meet this mandate, FERC primarily relies on physical inspections of the facilities. The Commission is incorporating risk-informed decision making into its dam safety program. By doing so, the Commission is focusing its resources on those structures that pose the greatest risk. The Commission also has an important role in maintaining the reliability of the electric transmission grid through its oversight of the bulk power system infrastructure and the Electric Reliability Organization (ERO). The ERO develops and enforces mandatory reliability standards, including cyber and physical security standards, subject to the Commission's oversight and approval. The Reliability Standards development process uses an open and inclusive process that employs extensive negotiation, consultation and coordination among many stakeholders. Regional Entities may also develop regional Reliability Standards or regional modifications to a national Reliability Standard. In addition, the ERO may develop interpretations of approved standards, subject to Commission review. In all such cases, the Commission must either accept or remand these filings. The Commission may also, upon its own motion or upon complaint, order the ERO to submit a proposed reliability standard or a modification of an existing reliability standard that addresses a specific reliability matter. Once proposed standards are filed, it is important that the Commission respond in a timely manner so that mandatory and enforceable standards affecting reliability can be implemented in a timely manner. Rigorous audits and investigations of potential violations coupled with appropriate penalties and adequate mitigation plans should reduce the frequency of repeat violations of Reliability Standards. To determine the effectiveness of the compliance program, the Commission has developed a process to track the number and type of violations. The Commission has also established contacts throughout the industry and other government agencies to identify other reliability issues.

Management Initiatives._The Commission has management initiatives underway and administrative processes in place to support its two strategic goals. These activities, including the effective management of human capital, agency resources and information technology, help the Commission work more efficiently, both within and across program areas. The Commission also understands that open lines of communication with affected parties and the public are critical for effective function of Commission operations. The Commission therefore communicates its policies and actions to the public in order to provide a transparent and open process.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

99.9 Total new obligations 305 306 305

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 1,468 1,480 1,480

Clean Coal Technology

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0235–0–1–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 5 6 6
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 1
1900 Budget authority (total) 1
1930 Total budgetary resources available 6 6 6
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 6 6 6

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1
3020 Outlays (gross) –1
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 1
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 1
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4033 Non-Federal sources –1

The Clean Coal Technology Program was established in the 1980s to perform commercial-scale demonstrations of advanced coal-based technologies. The budget proposes no new funding. All projects have concluded and only closeout activities remain.

Alternative Fuels Production

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5180–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 9
1022 Capital transfer of unobligated balances to general fund –9

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 9
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –9
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 9

The alternative fuels program was established in 1980 for the purpose of expediting the development and production of alternative fuels from coal. A loan guarantee was issued by the Department of Energy in 1982 for the construction and startup of the Great Plains Synthetic Fuels Plant to produce synthetic gas lignite coal.

Upon default of the borrower in 1985 under the terms of the loan guarantee, the Department acquired ownership of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project plant by foreclosure. On October 31, 1988, the Department completed the transfer of the Great Plains Plant to Dakota Gasification Company (DGC) under terms of an Asset Purchase Agreement.

Funds in this account had previously been used to pay for expenses and responsibilities related to the Department's prior operation of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project and any close-out expenses related to the Asset Purchase Agreement, which expired on December 31, 2009. In August 2012 a balance outstanding of $9 million of prior-year obligations in this account was returned, in entirety, to the Treasury via a SF-1151 Nonexpenditure transfer pursuant to 2 U.S.C. 661 d(d).

Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5523–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year
Receipts:
0220 OCS Receipts, Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund 50 50 50
0221 OCS Receipts, Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund –50



0299 Total receipts and collections 50 50



0400 Total: Balances and collections 50 50
Appropriations:
0500 Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund –50 –50 –50
0501 Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund 50



0599 Total appropriations –50 –50



0799 Balance, end of year

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5523–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Consortium-Ultra-Deepwater 36 36 36
0002 NETL-Ultra-Deepwater 14 15 14



0900 Total new obligations 50 51 50

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 1 1
Budget authority:
Appropriations, mandatory:
1201 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 50 50 50



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 50 50 50
1930 Total budgetary resources available 51 51 50
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 1

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 131 146 118
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 50 51 50
3020 Outlays (gross) –35 –79 –99



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 146 118 69
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 131 146 118
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 146 118 69

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 50 50 50
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 2 20 20
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 33 59 79



4110 Outlays, gross (total) 35 79 99
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 50 50 50
4190 Outlays, net (total) 35 79 99

Summary of Budget Authority and Outlays (in millions of dollars)


2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Enacted/requested:
Budget Authority 50 50 50
Outlays 35 79 99
Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO:
Budget Authority –50
Outlays –20
Total:
Budget Authority 50 50
Outlays 35 79 79

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–58) created a mandatory Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research program beginning in 2007. The program is funded from Federal revenues from oil and gas leases. This Budget proposes to cancel the program through a legislative proposal.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5523–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 10 8 8
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 2 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1
25.5 Research and development contracts 37 42 41



99.9 Total new obligations 50 51 50

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–5523–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 4 4 4

Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Fund

(Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5523–4–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Consortium-Ultra-Deepwater –36
0002 NETL-Ultra-Deepwater –14



0900 Total new obligations –50

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, mandatory:
1201 Appropriation (special or trust fund) –50



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) –50
1930 Total budgetary resources available –50

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts –50
3020 Outlays (gross) 20



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year –30
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3200 Obligated balance, end of year –30

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross –50
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority –20
4180 Budget authority, net (total) –50
4190 Outlays, net (total) –20

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5523–4–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services –8
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources –1
25.5 Research and development contracts –41



99.9 Total new obligations –50

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–5523–4–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment –4

Elk Hills School Lands Fund

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5428–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 15 15 16
Receipts:
0220 Elk Hills School Lands Fund 1



0400 Total: Balances and collections 15 16 16



0799 Balance, end of year 15 16 16

Title XXXIV, Subtitle B of Public Law 104–106 required the Department to sell the government's interest in Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1;Elk Hills) pursuant to the terms of the Act. The sale occurred in February 1998. Section 3415 of the Act required, among other things, that the Department make an offer of settlement based on the fair value of the State of California's longstanding claims to two parcels of land ("school lands'') within the Reserve. Under the Act, nine percent of the net proceeds were reserved in a contingent fund in the Treasury for payment to the State. In compliance with the Act and in order to remove any cloud over title which could diminish the sales value of the Reserve, the Department entered into a settlement agreement with the State on October 11, 1996, in which the Department agreed to compensate the State of California for its claim of title to two sections of land with NPR-1. The 'Settlement Agreement" stipulates installments totaling nine percent of the net proceeds from the sale will be paid to the State. Installments totaling $299,520,000 have been paid to date. On April 21,2011 the Department settled NPR-1 final equity with Chevron. Under the terms of the settlement, Chevron paid $108,000,000 to the United States. That, in turn, increased the net proceeds of the sale. On August 3, 2011, the Department and the State agreed on the final payment of $15,579,815 with respect to the longstanding claim on the two sections of land.

Payments to States under Federal Power Act

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5105–0–2–806 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year
Receipts:
0200 Licenses under Federal Power Act from Public Lands and National Forests, Payment to States (37 1/2%) 3 3 3



0400 Total: Balances and collections 3 3 3
Appropriations:
0500 Payments to States under Federal Power Act –3 –3 –3



0799 Balance, end of year

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5105–0–2–806 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Direct program activity 3 3 3



0900 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 3 3 3

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, mandatory:
1201 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 3 3 3



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 3 3 3
1930 Total budgetary resources available 3 3 3

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 2
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 3 3 3
3020 Outlays (gross) –5 –3 –3
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 2

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 3 3 3
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 3 3 3
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 2



4110 Outlays, gross (total) 5 3 3
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 3 3 3
4190 Outlays, net (total) 5 3 3

The States are paid 37.5 percent of the receipts from licenses for occupancy and use of national forests and public lands within their boundaries issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (16 U.S.C. 810).

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve

For necessary expenses for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage, operation, and management activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, $8,000,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5369–0–2–274 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 NEHOR 156 10 8



0900 Total new obligations (object class 25.2) 156 10 8

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 233 92 92
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 5



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 238 92 92
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 10 10 8



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 10 10 8
1900 Budget authority (total) 10 10 8
1930 Total budgetary resources available 248 102 100
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 92 92 92

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 12 16 18
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 156 10 8
3020 Outlays (gross) –147 –8 –10
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –5



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 16 18 16
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 12 16 18
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 16 18 16

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 10 10 8
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 8 6
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 6 4



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 6 8 10
Mandatory:
Outlays, gross:
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 141
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 10 10 8
4190 Outlays, net (total) 147 8 10

The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an emergency supply of home heating oil supply for the Northeast States during times of inventory shortages and significant threats to immediate further supply. In FY 2011, the NEHHOR sold its 2 million barrel inventory of high sulfur heating oil located in Northeast commercial terminals. In order to comply with new Northeast states' emission standards, 1 million barrels of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) was purchased and stored at commercial terminals at Groton, CT and Boston, MA by the end of FY 2012. The FY 2014 Budget continues the operation and management of the Reserve, including the extension of the leases for the Northeast commercial storage terminals.

Nuclear Waste Disposal

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 26,110 28,170 30,253
Receipts:
0220 Nuclear Waste Disposal Fund 753 755 775
0240 Earnings on Investments, Nuclear Waste Disposal Fund 1,310 1,331 1,447



0299 Total receipts and collections 2,063 2,086 2,222



0400 Total: Balances and collections 28,173 30,256 32,475
Appropriations:
0500 Nuclear Energy –24
0501 Salaries and Expenses –3 –3 –3



0599 Total appropriations –3 –3 –27



0799 Balance, end of year 28,170 30,253 32,448

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Repository 6



0900 Total new obligations (object class 41.0) 6

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 15 9 9
1930 Total budgetary resources available 15 9 9
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 9 9 9

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 22 18
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 6
3020 Outlays (gross) –10 –18



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 18
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 22 18
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 18

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 10 18
4190 Outlays, net (total) 10 18

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
5000 Total investments, SOY: Federal securities: Par value 48,611 49,552 54,206
5001 Total investments, EOY: Federal securities: Par value 49,552 54,206 58,860

A new nuclear waste management approach was outlined in the Administrations January 2013 Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste and the FY 2014 Budget reflects this new effort. The Budget includes a proposal to implement funding reforms needed to support the new approach, which includes the collection of one-time fees anticipated to begin in the 2022 timeframe. Additional discussion of the proposal can be found in the narrative for the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy account.

In FY 2010, the Department closed the Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Residual obligations and outlays in the Nuclear Waste Disposal account are associated with Yucca project closeout activities and remaining legacy activities such as accounting.

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund

For necessary expenses in carrying out uranium enrichment facility decontamination and decommissioning, remedial actions, and other activities of title II of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and title X, subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, $554,823,000, to be derived from the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 4,193 3,880 3,511
Receipts:
0200 Assessments, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 200
0240 Earnings on Investments, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 159 106 107
0241 General Fund Payment - Defense, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 463



0299 Total receipts and collections 159 106 770



0400 Total: Balances and collections 4,352 3,986 4,281
Appropriations:
0500 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund –473 –475 –555
0501 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 1



0599 Total appropriations –472 –475 –555



0799 Balance, end of year 3,880 3,511 3,726

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Oak Ridge 201 202 177
0002 Paducah 81 82 262
0003 Portsmouth 190 191 92
0004 Pension and Community and Regulatory Support 24



0900 Total new obligations 472 475 555

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 473 475 555
1132 Appropriations temporarily reduced –1



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 472 475 555
1930 Total budgetary resources available 472 475 555

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 242 150 162
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 472 475 555
3020 Outlays (gross) –564 –463 –552



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 150 162 165
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 242 150 162
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 150 162 165

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 472 475 555
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 396 333 389
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 168 130 163



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 564 463 552
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 472 475 555
4190 Outlays, net (total) 564 463 552

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
5000 Total investments, SOY: Federal securities: Par value 4,372 4,022 3,906
5001 Total Investments, end of year: Federal securities: Par Value 4,022 3,906 3,790

Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities._Funds 1) projects to decontaminate, decommission, and remediate the sites and facilities of the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio; Paducah, Kentucky; and East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; 2) pensions and post-retirement medical benefits for active and inactive gaseous diffusion plant workers.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 8 8 9
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 259 261 304
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 202 203 238
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 3 3 4



99.9 Total new obligations 472 475 555

Uranium Sales and Remediation

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–5530–0–2–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 5 5
3020 Outlays (gross) –5



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 5
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 5 5
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 5

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
Outlays, gross:
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 5
4190 Outlays, net (total) 5

The Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 2006 provided the Department of Energy authority to barter, transfer, or sell uranium and to use any proceeds, without fiscal year limitation, to remediate contaminated uranium inventories held by the Secretary of Energy.

Isotope Production and Distribution Program Fund

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–4180–0–3–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0801 Isotope Production and Distribution Reimbursable program 47 47 47

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 18 18 18
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 47 47 47



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 47 47 47
1930 Total budgetary resources available 65 65 65
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 18 18 18

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 41 41 37
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 47 47 47
3020 Outlays (gross) –47 –51 –51



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 41 37 33
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 41 41 37
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 41 37 33

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 47 47 47
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 4 47 47
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 43 4 4



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 47 51 51
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –20 –20 –20
4033 Non-Federal sources –27 –27 –27



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –47 –47 –47
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 4 4
4190 Outlays, net (total) 4 4

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–4180–0–3–271 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Reimbursable obligations:
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 1 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 45 45 45
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 47 47 47

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

For administrative expenses in carrying out the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, $6,000,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0322–0–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0010 Administrative Expenses -ARRA 1
Credit program obligations:
0701 Direct loan subsidy 4,223
0705 Reestimates of direct loan subsidy 2 13
0706 Interest on reestimates of direct loan subsidy 94
0709 Administrative expenses 5 7 8



0791 Direct program activities, subtotal 7 4,337 8



0900 Total new obligations 8 4,337 8

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 4,066 4,230 6
1001 Discretionary unobligated balance brought fwd, Oct 1 4,066 4,230
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 164



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 4,230 4,230 6
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 6 6 6



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 6 6 6
Appropriations, mandatory:
1200 Appropriation 2 107



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 2 107
1900 Budget authority (total) 8 113 6
1930 Total budgetary resources available 4,238 4,343 12
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 4,230 6 4

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1,128 122 3,377
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 8 4,337 8
3020 Outlays (gross) –850 –1,082 –1,697
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –164



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 122 3,377 1,688
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1,128 122 3,377
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 122 3,377 1,688

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 6 6 6
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 3 5 5
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 845 970 1,692



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 848 975 1,697
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 2 107
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 2 107
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 8 113 6
4190 Outlays, net (total) 850 1,082 1,697

Summary of Loan Levels, Subsidy Budget Authority and Outlays by Program (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0322–0–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct loan levels supportable by subsidy budget authority:
115001 Direct Auto Loans 16,602



115999 Total direct loan levels 16,602
Direct loan subsidy (in percent):
132001 Direct Auto Loans 0.00 25.44 0.00



132999 Weighted average subsidy rate 0.00 25.44 0.00
Direct loan subsidy budget authority:
133001 Direct Auto Loans 4,224



133999 Total subsidy budget authority 4,224
Direct loan subsidy outlays:
134001 Direct Auto Loans 837 967 1,689



134999 Total subsidy outlays 837 967 1,689
Direct loan upward reestimates:
135001 Direct Auto Loans 2 108



135999 Total upward reestimate budget authority 2 108
Direct loan downward reestimates:
137001 Direct Auto Loans –1,131 –919



137999 Total downward reestimate budget authority –1,131 –919

Administrative expense data:
3510 Budget authority 6 6 6
3580 Outlays from balances 7 2 2
3590 Outlays from new authority 3 5 6

Section 136 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 established a direct loan program to support the development of advanced technology vehicles and associated components in the United States, known as the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program (ATVM). The 2009 Continuing Resolution (CR), enacted on September 30, 2008, appropriated $7.5 billion to support a maximum of $25 billion in loans under the ATVM. The ATVM provides loans to automobile and automobile part manufacturers' for the cost of re-equipping, expanding, or establishing manufacturing facilities in the United States to produce advanced technology vehicles or qualified components and for associated engineering integration costs.

The FY 2014 Budget reflects placeholder estimates for direct loan subsidy costs. These estimates are not related to any specific project proposals. DOE will calculate the credit subsidy cost of any direct loan on a case-by-case basis in accordance with Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 (FCRA) and OMB Circular A-11. For any project, the terms and conditions of the loan, the risks associated with the project, and any other factor that affects the amount and timing of such cash flows will affect the credit subsidy cost calculations.

As required by the FCRA, this account records, for this program, the subsidy costs associated with the direct loans committed in 1992 and beyond (including modifications of direct loans that resulted from obligations or commitments in any year), as well as administrative expenses of this program. The subsidy amounts are estimated on a present value basis; the administrative expenses are estimated on a cash basis.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–0322–0–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 2 1 1
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 3 5 6
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 2 4,330



99.9 Total new obligations 8 4,337 8

Employment Summary


Identification code 89–0322–0–1–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 14 12 11

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Direct Loan Financing Account

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 89–4579–0–3–272 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Credit program obligations:
0710 Direct loan obligations 16,602
0715 Interest paid to FFB 329 653 631
0742 Downward reestimate paid to receipt account 987 919
0743 Interest on downward reestimates 145



0900 Total new obligations 1,461 18,174 631

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 2,671 1,290 4,664
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 731
1023 Unobligated balances applied to repay debt –149 –383 –258
1024 Unobligated balance of borrowing authority withdrawn –731



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 2,522 907