ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Federal Funds

Office of Inspector General

For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, $45,227,000, to remain available until September 30, 2015.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0112–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 4 4 4
0012 Clean and Safe Water 21 19 19
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 20 19 18
0014 Healthy Communities and Ecosystems 3 3 3
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 2 2 2
0016 Recovery Act 6



0799 Total direct obligations 56 47 46
0801 Reimbursable from Superfund Trust Fund 12 10 11



0900 Total new obligations 68 57 57

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 21 8 3
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 5



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 26 8 3
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 42 42 45



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 42 42 45
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 11 10 11
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –1



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 10 10 11
1900 Budget authority (total) 52 52 56
1930 Total budgetary resources available 78 60 59
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1940 Unobligated balance expiring –2
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 8 3 2

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 9 13 11
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 68 57 57
3011 Obligations incurred, expired accounts 1
3020 Outlays (gross) –60 –59 –51
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –5



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 13 11 17
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –7 –5 –5
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 1
3071 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, expired 1



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –5 –5 –5
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 2 8 6
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 8 6 12

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 52 52 56
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 36 40 43
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 24 19 8



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 60 59 51
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –12 –10 –11
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 1
4052 Offsetting collections credited to expired accounts 1



4060 Additional offsets against budget authority only (total) 2



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 42 42 45
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 48 49 40
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 42 42 45
4190 Outlays, net (total) 48 49 40

This appropriation supports the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) core programs by providing funds for Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit, evaluation, and investigative products and advisory services. These products and services contribute substantially to improved environmental quality and human health, as well as improved business practices and accountability. Specifically, the OIG performs contract audits and investigations that focus on costs claimed by contractors and assess the effectiveness of contract management. Assistance agreement audits and investigations evaluate the award, administration, and costs of assistance agreements. Program audits, evaluations, and investigations determine the extent to which the desired results or benefits envisioned by the Administration and the Congress are being achieved, and identify activities that could undermine the integrity, efficiency, and effectiveness of EPA programs. Financial statement audits review financial systems and statements to ensure that adequate controls are in place and EPA's accounting information is timely, accurate, reliable and useful, and complies with applicable laws and regulations. Efficiency, risk assessment, and program performance audits review the economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of operations by examining EPA's structure and processes for achieving environmental goals, including assessing risk, setting priorities, developing implementation strategies, and measuring performance. Information resource management audits review EPA information technology and systems to test the integrity of data and systems controls, as well as compliance with a variety of Federal information security laws and requirements. Investigations prevent, detect, and seek prosecution for criminal activity and serious misconduct in EPA programs and operations. Major areas of investigative focus include: financial fraud, infrastructure/terrorist threat, program integrity, employee integrity, cyber crimes, and theft of intellectual or sensitive data. In addition, the EPA Inspector General serves as the IG for the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board providing the full range of audit, evaluation, and investigative services specified by the Inspector General Act, as amended. Additional funds for audit, evaluation, and investigative activities associated with the Superfund Trust Fund are appropriated under that account and transferred to the Inspector General account. This appropriation also supports activities under the Working Capital Fund.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0112–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 27 27 27
11.1 Full-time permanent - Recovery Act 2
11.3 Other than full-time permanent - Recovery Act 2
11.5 Other personnel compensation 2 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 33 29 29
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 9 9 8
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services - Recovery Act 3
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 5 4 4
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 1 1 1
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 1 1 1
31.0 Equipment 2 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 56 47 46
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 12 10 11



99.9 Total new obligations 68 57 57

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–0112–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 289 293 300
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 63 65 66

Science and Technology

For science and technology, including research and development activities, which shall include research and development activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended; necessary expenses for personnel and related costs and travel expenses; procurement of laboratory equipment and supplies; and other operating expenses in support of research and development, $783,926,000, to remain available until September 30, 2015.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0107–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 267 258 254
0012 Clean and Safe Water 149 144 142
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 200 193 191
0014 Healthy Communities and Ecosystems 190 184 181
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 20 19 19



0799 Total direct obligations 826 798 787
0801 Reimbursements from Superfund Trust Fund 25 25 25
0802 Other Reimbursements 7 6 6



0899 Total reimbursable obligations 32 31 31



0900 Total new obligations 858 829 818

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 144 141 174
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 30 32 30



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 174 173 204
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 795 799 784
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –1



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 794 799 784
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 32 31 31
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 4



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 36 31 31
1900 Budget authority (total) 830 830 815
1930 Total budgetary resources available 1,004 1,003 1,019
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1940 Unobligated balance expiring –5
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 141 174 201

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 422 388 350
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 858 829 818
3011 Obligations incurred, expired accounts 13
3020 Outlays (gross) –864 –835 –824
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –30 –32 –30
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –11



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 388 350 314
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –39 –32 –32
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –4
3071 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, expired 11



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –32 –32 –32
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 383 356 318
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 356 318 282

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 830 830 815
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 484 488 498
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 380 347 326



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 864 835 824
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –37 –31 –31
4033 Non-Federal sources –5



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –42 –31 –31
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –4
4052 Offsetting collections credited to expired accounts 10



4060 Additional offsets against budget authority only (total) 6



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 794 799 784
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 822 804 793
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 794 799 784
4190 Outlays, net (total) 822 804 793

This appropriation finances salary, travel, science, technology, environmental monitoring, research, and development activities including laboratory and center supplies, certain operating expenses (including activities under the Working Capital Fund), contracts, grants, intergovernmental agreements, and purchases of scientific equipment. In addition, for fiscal years 2006–2015, the Administrator may employ persons in the Office of Research and Development under the authority provided in 42 U.S.C. 209. These activities provide the scientific and technology basis for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy and regulatory development actions. This appropriation supports core Agency programs and each of the Agency's five goals. Specifically in 2014, its emphasis will be placed on the following:

Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality._To develop adaptation strategies to address climate change and improve air quality, EPA will conduct a range of science and technology activities. These include research to inform the review of the national ambient air quality standards that builds upon new science and work already performed to improve understanding of ozone, particulate matter, lead, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide. In 2014, the Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) research program will identify air quality benefits associated with climate mitigation and adaptation choices to inform national and regional climate decisions. The program also will conduct systems research and life cycle analysis to understand the production, operation, and impacts of energy systems on health and the environment. Research on the generation, fate, transport, and chemical transformation of air emissions will identify individual and population health risks to inform clean air management decisions in the context of a changing climate and evolving energy use. The ACE research program will also develop and evaluate new approaches for monitoring levels of air pollutants— including air toxics— that may be used to enhance and reduce the cost and/or burden of monitoring for communities and industrial facilities. The integration of these program elements recognizes the relationship between climate and air quality, and aims to promote sustainable energy production with minimal unintended public health and ecosystem consequences. Separate from the ACE research program, EPA will continue collecting air data to inform implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR), targeting power plant emissions that drift across the borders of Eastern States and the District of Columbia. EPA will also develop, implement, and ensure compliance with regulatory programs that will significantly reduce emissions from highway and non-road sources, including the implementation of greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles. EPA will continue to implement the renewable fuels provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109–58) and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110–140). In addition, EPA will develop tools for State and local governments and Tribes to use in developing clean air plans to achieve air quality standards. EPA also aims to improve indoor environments through the provision of technical support and analysis to understand indoor air effects and the identification of potential health risks.

Protecting America's Waters._In 2014 through the Safe and Sustainable Water Research (SSWR) program, EPA will conduct research to meet the following science needs articulated by EPA's water program: evaluating groups of contaminants for the protection of human health and the environment; developing innovative tools, technologies, and strategies for managing water resources (including stormwater); and supporting a systems approach for protecting and restoring aquatic systems. The systems approach includes research to inform setting water quality criteria, establishing measures to assess and manage watersheds, and developing effective source control and management methods, especially for urban uses. A major component of the research program is working to support EPA's Drinking Water Strategy.
The SSWR program will address potential water supply endangerments associated with hydraulic fracturing. In addition to continuing work associated with its ongoing study, EPA will coordinate with the Department of Energy and the U.S. Geological Survey to understand and address potential impacts of natural gas development using hydraulic fracturing.
Within the SSWR program, green infrastructure research will continue to assess, develop, and compile scientifically rigorous tools and models that will be used by EPA's Office of Water, States and municipalities. In addition, SSWR and the other research programs are demonstrating innovative water technologies that will help the Army meet its goals of Net Zero energy, water and waste by 2020 across the country and overseas. Currently, there are demonstration sites at Fort Riley, in Kansas, and at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington State.

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._In 2014, the Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) research program will develop decision support tools to enable communities' decision makers to solve complex human health and environmental problems. The program will identify health risks and stressors, especially those that disproportionately impact vulnerable populations such as children and the elderly.
The land preservation and restoration research has evolved from waste treatment to focus on beneficial reuse, avoidance of more toxic materials, and operation of waste management facilities to conserve capacity and produce energy. Research will address resource conservation and material reuse issues, as well as the application of alternative landfill covers and the benefits of landfill bioreactors. Superfund research costs are appropriated to the Hazardous Substance Superfund Trust Fund appropriation and transferred to this account to allow for proper accounting.
The SHC research program will incorporate the principles of sustainability into its research in many capacities to promote sustainable environmental technologies with a focus on developing a new generation of smart technologies. Research on decision support tools will also be a component of EPA's emphasis on sustainability.
Examples of the application of SHC's decision support tools include: integrating research on pesticide and toxic substances with research on human health and ecosystems; mapping, monitoring, and modeling pollutants such as nitrogen; conducting ecosystem type assessments, and assessing risk management decisions for human health. A component of this research will focus on decreasing risks to vulnerable communities and groups that are disproportionately affected by existing problems. The program will conduct a long-term assessment of EPA's laboratory network, reflecting EPA's efforts to collaborate across traditional program boundaries to support national and regional decision making, thereby strengthening the Agency's ability to respond to environmental and public health issues as "one EPA."
In 2014, EPA's Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) program continue efforts to develop assessments and scientific products that are used extensively by EPA Program and Regional offices, and other parties to estimate the potential risk to public health from exposure to environmental contaminants to develop regulatory standards, and to manage environmental clean-ups. The HHRA research program provides the scientific foundation for Agency actions to protect public health and the environment with four specific components:
(1) Integrated Risk Information System health hazard and dose-response assessments;
(2) Integrated Science Assessments of criteria air pollutants;
(3) Community Risk and Technical Support for exposure and health assessments; and
(4) Methods, models, and approaches to modernize risk assessment for the 21st century.
The Homeland Security research program will continue to support research efforts on evaluating chemical, biological, and radiological analytical methods; event detection software; and calibration of contaminant warning systems. The Homeland Security research program will conduct research on decontamination and management of its consequences for public health, as well as methods for protecting water infrastructures and assessing both threats, and their consequences. In 2014, Water Infrastructure Protection Research will focus on developing and testing decontamination approaches for water infrastructure and on treating CBR contaminated water caused by terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and/or accidents. Research on real time distribution system models and methods to isolate and treat contaminated water, clean distribution systems, redirect water, and return water systems to service quickly and affordably is in progress. In 2014, as part of the Water Security Initiative (WSI), EPA will focus on completing software tools that provide practical, tailored guidance for the water sector on deploying drinking water contamination warning systems, along with conducting outreach and training on those tools. The EPA will also continue to support water sector-specific agency responsibilities, including the Water Alliance for Threat Reduction, to protect the nation's critical water infrastructure. EPA will continue to oversee the regional laboratory networks that form the Water Laboratory Alliance, a nationally consistent program that enables the water sector to rapidly analyze a surge of laboratory samples during a significant contamination event.

Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution._Impacts to people or the environment from chemicals can occur at any point from the extraction of raw materials to the chemical's end of life when it is disposed of or recycled. The Chemical Safety and Sustainability (CSS) research program is bulding upon existing EPA research in chemical management and extending efforts to develop innovative, transdisciplinary approaches and tools that better inform sustainable design solutions. In 2014, the CSS program will conduct research on the environmental impacts of chemicals from a life cycle perspective. In addition, the CSS program will conduct research on integrated chemical evaluation strategies. CSS will support the development and application of improved and new computational systems models of pathways and tissues, rapid cost-efficient exposure models, and user-friendly web based tools for analysis and decision support. In 2014, EPA will continue its collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), under the auspices of the Tox21 consortium. Tox21's high-speed robot screening system will continue testing over 8,000 different chemicals, to include nanomaterials and other chemicals found in industrial and consumer products, food additives, and drugs, for potential toxicity. Additionally, the CSS research program plans to:
(1) Improve dashboards in order to provide partners and decision makers with intuitive and user-friendly tools and graphical depictions of chemical data that will be useful for addressing specific regulatory and environmental questions;
(2) Develop methods to translate the research findings of the CSS program into useful decision support tools for the other Agency Research Programs;
(3) Produce chemical structure files that cover the EPA's eco-toxicological databases, high throughput testing programs like ToxCast and Tox21, and the FDA's food additive database. These files support predictive modeling efforts and will be incorporated into structure-searching tools and CSS Dashboards for ongoing use; and
(4) Provide and demonstrate stolutions for the sustainable design, production, and use of new chemicals using life cycle chemical assessments in order to encourage the use of green engineering principles by manufacturers.
In 2014, the Agency will protect human health by ensuring the availability of appropriate analytical methods for detecting pesticide residues in food and feed, ensuring suitability for monitoring pesticide residues, and enforcing tolerances. This will be accomplished by developing and validating multi-residue pesticide analytical methods for food, feed, and water for use by other Federal and State laboratories, and subsequently the program office. Laboratories further support the estimation of human health risks from pesticide use by operating the National Pesticide Standard Repository (NPSR). The NPSR will also protect the environment by supporting Federal and State laboratories involved in enforcement activities.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._In 2014, EPA's Forensics Support program will continue to provide specialized scientific and technical support for the Nation's most complex civil and criminal enforcement cases, as well as technical expertise for Agency compliance efforts. This work is critical to determining non-compliance and building viable enforcement cases. The EPA's National Enforcement Investigations Center (NEIC) is a fully accredited environmental forensics center under International Standards Organization 17025, the main standard used by testing and calibration laboratories, as recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. NEIC works closely with the EPA Criminal Investigation Division to provide technical support (e.g., sampling, analysis, consultation and testimony) to criminal investigations. NEIC also works closely with the Regional Offices to provide technical assistance, consultation, on-site inspection, investigation, and case resolution services in support of the EPA's Civil Enforcement program.
NEIC will continue to apply its technical resources in support of EPA's national enforcement priorities, and support the technical aspects of criminal investigations. Efforts to stay at the forefront of environmental enforcement in 2014 include focused refinement of single and multi-media compliance monitoring investigation approaches, customized laboratory methods to solve unusual enforcement case challenges, and applied research and development in both laboratory and field applications.

Enabling and Support Programs._Enabling and Support Programs provide the people, facilities, and systems necessary to operate the programs funded by the Science and Technology appropriations. The offices and the functions they perform are: Administration and Resources Management (facilities infrastructure and operations) and Environmental Information (information technology/data management).

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0107–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 242 241 240
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 14 14 13
11.5 Other personnel compensation 5 5 5
11.7 Military personnel 2 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 263 262 260
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 74 74 73
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 5 5 5
22.0 Transportation of things 1 1 1
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 30 30 29
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 20 19 19
24.0 Printing and reproduction 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 46 43 42
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 103 96 96
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 30 28 27
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 36 35 34
25.5 Research and development contracts 85 79 78
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 12 12 11
26.0 Supplies and materials 11 11 10
31.0 Equipment 14 14 13
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 95 88 88



99.0 Direct obligations 826 798 787
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 32 31 31



99.9 Total new obligations 858 829 818

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–0107–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 2,418 2,414 2,418
1101 Direct military average strength employment 19 19 19
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 110 105 106
2101 Reimbursable military average strength employment 1 1 1

Environmental Programs and Management

For environmental programs and management, including necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for personnel and related costs and travel expenses; hire of passenger motor vehicles; hire, maintenance, and operation of aircraft; purchase of reprints; library memberships in societies or associations which issue publications to members only or at a price to members lower than to subscribers who are not members; administrative costs of the brownfields program under the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act of 2002; and not to exceed $9,000 for official reception and representation expenses, $2,812,757,000, to remain available until September 30, 2015.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution as well as amounts from P.L. 113–2, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (no language shown).

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0108–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 476 460 477
0012 Clean and Safe Water 988 954 988
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 371 358 371
0014 Healthy Communities and Ecosystems 437 422 437
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 517 499 517



0799 Total direct obligations 2,789 2,693 2,790
0801 Reimbursable program 70 58 57



0900 Total new obligations 2,859 2,751 2,847

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 156 171 298
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 141 140 140



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 297 311 438
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 2,683 2,695 2,813
1100 Appropriation 1
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –4



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 2,679 2,696 2,813
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 54 29 44
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 13 13



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 67 42 44
1900 Budget authority (total) 2,746 2,738 2,857
1930 Total budgetary resources available 3,043 3,049 3,295
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1940 Unobligated balance expiring –13
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 171 298 448

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1,408 1,301 1,183
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 2,859 2,751 2,847
3011 Obligations incurred, expired accounts 18
3020 Outlays (gross) –2,814 –2,700 –2,766
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –141 –140 –140
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –29 –29



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,301 1,183 1,124
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –123 –110 –110
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –13 –13
3071 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, expired 26 13



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –110 –110 –110
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1,285 1,191 1,073
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1,191 1,073 1,014

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 2,746 2,738 2,857
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1,879 1,825 1,908
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 935 875 858



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 2,814 2,700 2,766
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –30 –29 –44
4033 Non-Federal sources –34



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –64 –29 –44
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –13 –13
4052 Offsetting collections credited to expired accounts 10



4060 Additional offsets against budget authority only (total) –3 –13



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 2,679 2,696 2,813
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 2,750 2,671 2,722
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 2,679 2,696 2,813
4190 Outlays, net (total) 2,750 2,671 2,722

This appropriation includes funds for salaries, travel, contracts, grants, and cooperative agreements for pollution abatement, control, and compliance activities and administrative activities of the operating programs, including activities under the Working Capital Fund. This appropriation supports core Agency programs and each of the Agency's five goals. Specifically in 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will emphasize the following:

Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality._To protect and improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, EPA will apply a variety of approaches and appropriate tools. EPA will develop and implement strategies to attain ambient air quality standards for the six criteria pollutants: ozone, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and lead. EPA will reduce regional haze through regional approaches where significant transport of pollutants occurs. EPA will also develop control measures for sources that are best regulated at the Federal level. EPA will continue to develop and issue national technology-based and risk-based standards using a sector-based approach to reduce the quantity of toxic air pollutants emitted from industrial and manufacturing processes, as well as from urban sources. EPA will proceed with performing analyses to develop New Source Performance Standards, consistent with Clean Air Act requirements. The Acid Rain program will continue its market-based approach to achieving reduced emissions of sulfur dioxide primarily from electric utilities. The market-based approach will also be used in other programs, where permitted under the Clean Air Act, to reduce emissions of air pollutants. EPA will use its authority under the Clean Air Act to continue efforts to reduce GHGs domestically and internationally through cost-effective, non-regulatory programs while also pursuing regulatory options. Through implementation of the mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule, EPA will work with sources to obtain high quality data in a cost-effective manner. EPA will continue to provide support and oversight for local, State, and Tribal permitting authorities to efficiently process GHG permits, as well as issue permits directly to sources where there is no delegated permitting authority. EPA will continue partnerships with businesses and other sectors to help reduce GHGs through the greater use of energy efficient technologies and products that contribute to cleaner air. The voluntary government-industry partnership programs are designed to capitalize on the opportunities that consumers, businesses, and organizations have for making sound investments in efficient equipment, policies, practices, and transportation choices. EPA will continue to coordinate the implementation of the Global Methane Initiative to enhance global cooperation and expand efforts to capture and use methane as a clean alternative energy source. EPA will also participate with other agencies to help global efforts to increase energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions. EPA will implement voluntary outreach and partnership programs with State, Tribal, and local governments to improve indoor air quality and reduce potential risks to the public (including radon) in homes, schools, and workplaces. In addition, EPA will develop and use voluntary and regulatory programs, public information, and training to reduce public exposure to radiation. EPA will focus its domestic and international efforts to ensure that ozone-depleting substance production and import caps under the Montreal Protocol and Clean Air Act continue to be met.

Protecting America's Waters._To protect and restore our waters to ensure that drinking water is safe, and that aquatic ecosystems sustain fish, plants and wildlife, as well as support economic, recreational, and subsistence activities, EPA will focus on several key strategies. EPA's strategy for helping systems provide safe drinking water over the next several years includes developing or revising drinking water standards, supporting States, Tribes, and water systems in implementing standards, promoting sustainable management of water infrastructure, and protecting sources of drinking water from contamination. EPA will facilitate the ecosystem-scale protection and restoration of natural areas by supporting continuing efforts of all 28 National Estuary Program estuaries to implement their Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plans to protect and restore estuarine resources. To maximize the impact of each dollar, EPA will continue to strengthen its vital partnerships with States, Tribes, local governments, and other parties that are also working toward the common goal of improving the Nation's waters. EPA will implement the President's Executive Order on the Chesapeake Bay, implementing a strategy to restore Bay water quality. EPA will continue to lead the implementation of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The initiative provides $300 million for programs and projects strategically chosen to target the most significant environmental problems in the Great Lakes ecosystem. This investment will allow for implementation of important restoration activities emphasizing on-the-ground work to achieve the goals, objectives and targets of the Initiative. EPA expects continued progress within each of the Initiative's focus areas: Toxic Substances and Areas of Concerns, Invasive Species, Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source, Habitat and Wildlife Protection and Restoration, and Accountability, Education, Monitoring, Evaluation, Communication, and Partnerships. Appropriations language for this proposal can be found in EPA's Administrative Provisions. EPA will help States implement nationally consistent water quality monitoring programs which will eventually allow EPA to make a credible national assessment of water quality. High quality, current monitoring data is critical for EPA, States, Tribes and others to make watershed-based decisions, develop necessary water quality standards and total maximum daily loads, and accurately and consistently portray conditions and trends. In addition, EPA will continue work with its Federal partners to support the safe deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies as a climate mitigation strategy.

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._EPA will work to preserve land by ensuring proper management of waste, reducing waste generation and increasing recycling. EPA will continue to assist States in putting in place and maintaining permits at facilities that treat, store or dispose of hazardous waste. Although States are the primary implementers of the Corrective Action program which requires facilities managing hazardous waste to clean up past releases, EPA directly implements the program in 13 States and provides technical support and oversight for State-led activities. To achieve EPA's waste management goals, EPA will: (1) maintain partnerships with businesses, industries, Tribes, States, communities, and consumers; (2) promote environmentally responsible behavior by product manufacturers, users and disposers; and (3) encourage businesses, government, institutions and consumers to reduce waste generation and increase recycling through education, outreach, training, and technical assistance. EPA will also continue to work with States in order to bring all underground storage tank systems into compliance and keep them in compliance with the release detection and release prevention requirements outlined in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. EPA works with State, local, and Tribal partners to help protect the public and the environment from releases of hazardous substances from chemical handling facilities by helping them develop area-wide emergency response and contingency plans. EPA conducts audits and inspections of those facilities handling more than a threshold quantity of certain extremely hazardous chemicals that are required to implement a Risk Management Program to prevent releases. EPA will also support the operations and management of the Brownfields program, including training and technical support to assist communities to address general issues associated with properties of which redevelopment or reuse may be complicated by the presence of contamination. EPA is committed to ensuring environmental justice regardless of race, color, national origin, or income. Recognizing that minority and/or low-income communities may be exposed disproportionately to environmental harm and risks, EPA works to protect these communities from adverse health and environmental effects and to ensure they are given the opportunity to participate meaningfully in environmental clean-up decisions. EPA's Environmental Justice program will continue to incorporate environmental justice considerations in the rulemaking process. EPA will apply effective methods suitable for determining whether disproportionate environmental health impacts on minority, low-income, and tribal populations exist. Funds will also provide resources and FTE support for developing the new Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System.

Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution._To ensure that the foods the American public eats will be free from unsafe levels of pesticide residues, EPA will apply strict health-based standards to the registration of pesticides for use on food or animal feed and ensure that older pesticides meet current health standards. EPA will also work to expedite and increase the registration of safer pesticides and to decrease the use of pesticides with the highest potential to cause adverse effects. EPA intends to reduce potential human and environmental risks from commercial and residential exposure to pesticides through programs that focus on farmworker protection, endangered species protection, environmental stewardship, and integrated pest management. EPA's toxics program will continue to make substantial progress in protecting public health and the environment from harmful industrial chemicals by assessing the safety of new and existing chemicals, reducing gaps in the data available, strengthening chemical information management, and promoting greater transparency. EPA will also continue its efforts to alleviate health risks from exposure to lead-based paint and other sources of lead in the environment. EPA's Pollution Prevention (P2) program will continue to provide technical assistance, information and supporting assessments to encourage the use of greener chemicals, technologies, processes and products through eight programs: Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, Design for the Environment, Green Suppliers Network, Regional Grants, Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange, Partnership for Sustainable Healthcare, Green Chemistry, and Green Engineering. In addition, EPA's P2 program will continue to support the new Economy, Energy and Environment partnership among Federal agencies, local governments and manufactures to promote energy efficiency, job creation and environmental improvement.
The United States will coordinate with other nations in multilateral efforts to protect the environment and human health. EPA will continue to promote formal bilateral and multilateral environmental agreements with key countries, execute environmental components of the Administration's key foreign policy initiatives, and engage in regional and global negotiations aimed at reducing potential environmental risks via formal and informal agreements. EPA will continue to cooperate with other countries to ensure that domestic and international environmental laws, policies, and priorities are recognized and implemented and, where appropriate, promoted within the multilateral development assistance and trading system.
Combined with public demand for information, unprecedented changes in information technology are altering the way EPA, States, and Tribes collect, manage, analyze, use, secure, and provide access to quality environmental information. EPA is working with the States and Tribes to strengthen our information quality, leverage information maintained by other government organizations, and develop new tools that provide the public with simultaneous access to multiple data sets, allowing users to understand local, Tribal, State, regional, and national environmental conditions. Key to achieving information quality will be the further development of the National Environmental Information Exchange Network, which is primarily an affiliation between EPA and the States and Tribes. EPA will continue to reduce reporting burden, improve data quality, and accelerate data publications by accelerating the replacement of paper-based submissions with electronic reporting under the Toxic Release Inventory and other programs.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._EPA will implement a strong enforcement and compliance program focused on identifying and reducing non-compliant actions and deterring future non-compliant actions that violate the law. To improve compliance with environmental laws, EPA works to provide easy access to tools that help regulated entities, Federal agencies, and the public understand these laws and find efficient, cost-effective means for putting them into practice. EPA's enforcement program targets inspections and other compliance monitoring activities according to the degree of health and environmental risk. The program collaborates with the Department of Justice, States, local government agencies, and Tribal governments to ensure consistent and fair enforcement of all environmental laws and regulations. The program seeks to aggressively pursue violations that threaten communities, ensure a level economic playing field by ensuring that violators do not realize an economic benefit from noncompliance, and deter future violations. The Civil Enforcement program develops, litigates, and settles administrative and civil judicial cases against serious violators of environmental laws. The Criminal Enforcement program punishes violators of environmental laws by holding them accountable through jail sentences and criminal fines. Bringing criminal cases sends a strong deterrence message to potential violators, enhances aggregate compliance with laws and regulations and protects our communities. In 2014, EPA is continuing efforts to improve efficiencies by streamlining monitoring and reporting, improving transparency, more accurately gauging compliance, and better engaging the public.

Enabling and Support Programs._EPA's Enabling and Support Programs (ESPs) provide centralized management services and support to environmental programs. The offices and the functions they perform within the Environmental Programs and Management appropriation are: the Offices of Administration and Resources Management (facilities infrastructure and operations, acquisition management, human resources management services, and management of financial assistance grants/institutional assistance grants); Environmental Information (exchange network, information security, information technology/data management); the Administrator (administrative law, civil rights/Title VI compliance, congressional, intergovernmental and external relations, regional science and technology, Science Advisory Board); the Chief Financial Officer (strategic planning, annual planning and budgeting, financial services, financial management, analysis, and accountability); and General Counsel (alternative dispute resolution and legal advice). Since these centralized services provide support across EPA, resources for the ESPs are allocated across EPA's appropriations, goals, and objectives.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0108–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 1,106 1,090 1,107
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 30 29 30
11.5 Other personnel compensation 18 17 18
11.7 Military personnel 5 5 5
11.8 Special personal services payments 1 1 1



11.9 Total personnel compensation 1,160 1,142 1,161
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 326 325 326
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 4 4 4
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 20 19 20
22.0 Transportation of things 1 1 1
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 159 154 159
23.2 Rental payments to others 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 10 10 10
24.0 Printing and reproduction 7 7 7
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 125 121 125
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 480 440 480
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 192 185 192
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 25 24 25
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 27 26 27
26.0 Supplies and materials 7 7 7
31.0 Equipment 13 13 13
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 232 214 232



99.0 Direct obligations 2,789 2,693 2,790
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 70 58 57



99.9 Total new obligations 2,859 2,751 2,847

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–0108–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 10,604 10,648 10,550
1101 Direct military average strength employment 37 37 37
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 32 32 32
2101 Reimbursable military average strength employment 2 2 2

Buildings and Facilities

For construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities of, or for use by, the Environmental Protection Agency, $54,364,000, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0110–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 9 9 14
0012 Clean and Safe Water 6 6 9
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 7 7 11
0014 Healthy Communities and Ecosystems 11 10 16
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 5 5 7



0900 Total new obligations 38 37 57

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 4 3 4
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 1 1 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 5 4 5
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 36 37 54



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 36 37 54
1930 Total budgetary resources available 41 41 59
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 3 4 2

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 35 40 39
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 38 37 57
3020 Outlays (gross) –32 –37 –41
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –1 –1 –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 40 39 54
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 35 40 39
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 40 39 54

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 36 37 54
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 4 6 10
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 28 31 31



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 32 37 41
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 36 37 54
4190 Outlays, net (total) 32 37 41

This appropriation provides for the construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities that are owned or used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This appropriation supports the EPA-wide goals through Enabling and Support Programs that provide centralized management services and support to the EPA's various environmental programs. EPA's management infrastructure will set and implement the highest quality standards for effective internal management and fiscal responsibility. The facilities funded by this account will provide quality work environments and state-of-the-art laboratories that address employee safety and security and pollution prevention.

This appropriation also funds the design of a new, consolidated Federally owned multi-use facility, including a lab, to replace the multiple EPA leased locations in Las Vegas, Nevada, several of which have leases that are expiring in the next few years. The new facility will have a smaller overall footprint than the current leased locations and will be designed to be energy efficient with lower anticipated operating cost.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0110–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 1 1 1
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 5 5 8
32.0 Land and structures 32 31 48



99.9 Total new obligations 38 37 57

State and Tribal Assistance Grants

For environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, including capitalization grants for State revolving funds and performance partnership grants, $3,153,842,000, to remain available until expended, of which:

(1) $1,095,000,000 shall be for making capitalization grants for the Clean Water State Revolving Funds under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (the "Act''); and of which $817,000,000 shall be for making capitalization grants for the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, as amended: Provided, That for fiscal year 2014, to the extent there are sufficient project applications, not less than 20 percent of the funds made available under this title to each State for Clean Water State Revolving Fund capitalization grants shall be used by the State for green infrastructure projects: Provided further, That for fiscal year 2014, not less than 10 percent of the funds made available under this title to each State for Drinking Water State Revolving Fund capitalization grants shall be used for projects to address green infrastructure, water or energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative activities: Provided further, That notwithstanding section 603(d)(7) of the Act, the limitation on the amounts in a State water pollution control revolving fund that may be used by a State to administer the fund shall not apply to amounts included as principal in loans made by such fund in fiscal year 2014 and prior years where such amounts represent costs of administering the fund to the extent that such amounts are or were deemed reasonable by the Administrator, accounted for separately from other assets in the fund, and used for eligible purposes of the fund, including administration: Provided further, That for fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding the limitation on amounts in section 518(c) of the Act and section 1452(i) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, up to a total of 2 percent of the funds appropriated for State Revolving Funds under such Acts may be reserved by the Administrator for grants under section 518(c) and section 1452(i) of such Acts: Provided further, That for fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding the amounts specified in section 205(c) of the Act, up to 1.5 percent of the aggregate funds appropriated for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program under the Act less any sums reserved under section 518(c) of the Act, may be reserved by the Administrator for grants made under title II of the Clean Water Act for American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, and United States Virgin Islands: Provided further, That for fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding the limitations on amounts specified in section 1452(j) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, up to 1.5 percent of the funds appropriated for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund programs under the Safe Drinking Water Act may be reserved by the Administrator for grants made under section 1452(j) of the Safe Drinking Water Act: Provided further, That not less than 20 percent but not more than 30 percent of the funds made available under this title to each State for Clean Water State Revolving Fund capitalization grants and not less than 20 percent but not more than 30 percent of the funds made available under this title to each State for Drinking Water State Revolving Fund capitalization grants shall be used by the State to provide additional subsidy to eligible recipients in the form of forgiveness of principal, negative interest loans, or grants (or any combination of these), and shall be so used by the State only where such funds are provided as initial financing for an eligible recipient or to buy, refinance, or restructure the debt obligations of eligible recipients only where such debt was incurred on or after the date of enactment of this Act;

(2) $5,000,000 shall be for architectural, engineering, planning, design, construction and related activities in connection with the construction of high priority water and wastewater facilities in the area of the United States-Mexico Border, after consultation with the appropriate border commission; Provided, That no funds provided by this appropriations Act to address the water, wastewater and other critical infrastructure needs of the colonias in the United States along the United States-Mexico border shall be made available to a county or municipal government unless that government has established an enforceable local ordinance, or other zoning rule, which prevents in that jurisdiction the development or construction of any additional colonia areas, or the development within an existing colonia the construction of any new home, business, or other structure which lacks water, wastewater, or other necessary infrastructure;

(3) $10,000,000 shall be for grants to the State of Alaska to address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs of rural and Alaska Native Villages: Provided, That, of these funds: (1) the State of Alaska shall provide a match of 25 percent; and (2) no more than 5 percent of the funds may be used for administrative and overhead expenses;

(4) $85,000,000 shall be to carry out section 104(k) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended, including grants, interagency agreements, and associated program support costs: Provided , That not more than 25 percent of the amount appropriated to carry out section 104(k) of CERCLA shall be used for site characterization, assessment, and remediation of facilities described in section 101(39)(D)(ii)(II) of CERCLA;

(5) $6,000,000 shall be for grants under title VII, subtitle G of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as amended; and

(6) $1,135,842,000 shall be for grants, including associated program support costs, to States, federally recognized tribes, interstate agencies, tribal consortia, and air pollution control agencies for multi-media or single media pollution prevention, control and abatement and related activities, including activities pursuant to the provisions set forth under this heading in Public Law 104–134, and for making grants under section 103 of the Clean Air Act for particulate matter monitoring and data collection activities subject to terms and conditions specified by the Administrator, of which: $47,572,000 shall be for carrying out section 128 of CERCLA, as amended; $21,564,000 shall be for Environmental Information Exchange Network grants, including associated program support costs; $1,490,000 shall be for grants to States under section 2007(f)(2) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended, which shall be in addition to funds appropriated under the heading "Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program" to carry out the provisions of the Solid Waste Disposal Act specified in section 9508(c) of the Internal Revenue Code other than section 9003(h) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended; $4,000,000 shall be for a competitive grant program for states to develop and collect innovative measures for assessing the performance of the enforcement and compliance program or to design and implement innovative enforcement and compliance tools and approaches and measure the impact of such; $18,500,000 of the funds available for grants under section 106 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act shall be for State participation in national- and State-level statistical surveys of water resources and enhancements to State monitoring programs; and $15,000,000 of the funds available for grants under section 106 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act shall be awarded to States to achieve nutrient reductions.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution as well as amounts from P.L. 113–2, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (no language shown).

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0103–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 304 271 256
0012 Clean and Safe Water 3,571 3,177 3,080
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 328 292 276
0014 Healthy Communities and Ecosystems 37 33 31
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 28 25 24



0900 Total new obligations 4,268 3,798 3,667

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 856 306 762
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 150 64 64



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 1,006 370 826
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 3,619 3,635 3,154
1100 Discretionary Emergency pursuant to 2011 Budget Control Act 600
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –6
1131 Unobligated balance permanently reduced (balances cancelled) –45 –45



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 3,568 4,190 3,154
1900 Budget authority (total) 3,568 4,190 3,154
1930 Total budgetary resources available 4,574 4,560 3,980
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 306 762 313

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 9,011 7,890 7,135
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 4,268 3,798 3,667
3020 Outlays (gross) –5,223 –4,489 –3,893
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –150 –64 –64
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –16



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 7,890 7,135 6,845
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 9,011 7,890 7,135
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 7,890 7,135 6,845

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 3,568 4,190 3,154
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 490 459 447
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 4,733 4,030 3,446



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 5,223 4,489 3,893
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 3,568 4,190 3,154
4190 Outlays, net (total) 5,223 4,489 3,893

This appropriation supports core Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs and each of the EPA's five goals through grants to States, Tribes and other partners. EPA is using common elements for State and Tribal grant agreements, including Performance Partnerships. The elements clearly link to EPA's strategic plan to relate State workplan information into EPA's strategic and annual goals.

Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality._To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and address climate change and protect and improve air quality for every American community, EPA will offer media-specific and multi-media Performance Partnership grants, and technical assistance to States and Tribes. This financial and technical aid will assist them in the development of their Clean Air Plans, support solutions that address local air needs, and provide support for development of state programs that address GHG emissions. EPA will provide funds to States and Tribes under section 105 of the Clean Air Act to improve air monitoring networks to obtain better data on emissions of criteria pollutants and air toxics. EPA issued air quality standards for a new pollutant, fine particulate matter, in the late 1990s. Since that time, EPA has funded State and local fine particulate monitoring networks using the requirements of section 103 of the Clean Air Act, as authorized in annual appropriation bills. Section 103 provides full funding for pilot programs, demonstrations, research, and other one-time activities; section 105 requires State and local agencies to provide matching funds of at least 40 percent of the amount required for the entire continuing State or local clean air program. EPA is committed to continuing a transition to incorporate funding for fine particulate monitoring into the funding authorized by section 105 of the Clean Air Act for continuing State and local clean air programs. Using funds provided by EPA under sections 103 and 105, States and Tribes will prepare State Implementation Plans and Tribal Implementation Plans to achieve the revised, more protective National Ambient Air Quality Standards; implement new monitoring requirements, including technological upgrades and additional monitoring stations; and support the National Air Toxics Trends Stations monitoring network. Additionally, EPA will provide funds to States to support the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule, facilitating States' collection, review, and use of GHG emissions data. Additionally, funds will support GHG permitting to provide state and local agencies the resources to review permit applications and issue permits to large sources of greenhouse gas emissions.

Protecting America's Waters._This Agency goal is to reduce human exposure to contaminants in drinking water, fish and shellfish, and recreational waters and to protect and restore watersheds and aquatic ecosystems. In 2014, EPA will continue to work with State and local partners to develop policies that promote the use of water resources in ways that are both ecologically and economically sustainable. In support of this goal, EPA will provide $1.1 billion for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF). The Clean Water SRF makes low interest loans to communities and includes a set-aside for Tribes and U.S. Territories to construct wastewater treatment infrastructure, in addition to other projects that enhance water quality. The Federal Government has invested over $35 billion in grants to help capitalize the 51 Clean Water SRFs. With the required State match, additional State contributions and funds from program leveraging, funds made available for such Clean Water loans total over $97 billion. The SRFs also will support cost-effective, sustainable green infrastructure projects, as not less than 20 percent of the Clean Water SRF grants shall be used by the State for such activities. For 2014, not less than 10 percent of funds provided to States under the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds may be used for projects to address green infrastructure, water or energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative activities. The Budget also requests $817 million for the Drinking Water SRF, which makes low interest loans to public water systems and to Tribes and U.S. Territories to upgrade drinking water infrastructure to help them provide safe drinking water.
Direct grants are also provided to help address the significant water and wastewater infrastructure needs of Alaska Native Villages. EPA has implemented a management plan that optimizes the pace of the program. EPA will strengthen State core water quality protection and water enforcement programs. EPA will provide direct grant assistance for water and wastewater infrastructure projects on the U.S.-Mexico border. EPA has met its NAFTA commitment to provide a total of $700 million for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs in the area. However, in recognition of the continuing environmental and public health needs in the border area, the Budget continues funding for these activities.
EPA will support its partnerships with States, Tribes, and partners through media-specific and multi-media, and/or Performance Partnership grants to: (1) increase the number of community drinking water systems that meet all existing health-based standards, (2) protect watersheds by reducing point and nonpoint source pollution, (3) increase the acreage and improve the condition of wetlands, and (4) address agricultural and urban runoff and storm water. EPA will work with its State and Tribal partners to develop and implement broad-based and integrated monitoring and assessment programs that strengthen their water quality standards, improve decision-making, target restoration within the watershed, address significant stressors, and report on conditions.
Furthermore, EPA will enhance efforts to address nutrient pollution through working collaboratively with U.S. Department of Agriculture in high priority, focused watersheds and providing funding to States to undertake nutrient pollution reductions, including $15 million in Clean Water Act Section 106 grants.

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._Land is one of America's most valuable resources and cleaning up our communities to create a safe environment for all Americans while encouraging more sustainable development is critical to the future of our country. Hazardous and non-hazardous wastes on the land can migrate to the air, groundwater and surface water, contaminating drinking water supplies, causing acute illnesses or chronic diseases, and threatening healthy ecosystems in urban, rural, and suburban areas.
Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended, EPA provides grants to States to strengthen their ability to implement hazardous waste programs. EPA also provides financial and technical assistance to eligible Tribal governments and inter-tribal consortia. In 2014, EPA will provide grants or cooperative agreements to States for underground storage tank release prevention and detection programs. There will also be direct assistance through media-specific, and multimedia and/or Performance Partnership grants to enable Tribes to implement hazardous waste programs. EPA will also fund brownfields projects resulting in assessments and clean-up activities that assist communities in paving the way for the productive reuse of contaminated properties and abandoned sites.
In addition, EPA provides grants to assist States, Tribes, and partners with worker safety activities, protection of endangered species and water sources, and promotion of environmental stewardship. To protect, sustain or restore the health of people, communities and ecosystems, EPA will focus on the geographic areas with human and ecological communities at most risk. EPA is working to protect, sustain, and restore the health of natural habitats and ecosystems by identifying and evaluating problem areas, developing tools, and improving community capacity to address problems.
Under Federal environmental statutes, EPA is responsible for protecting human health and the environment in Tribal country. EPA works with over 500 Federally recognized Tribes located across the United States to improve environmental and human health outcomes. Tribal country totals more than 70 million acres with reservations ranging from less than 10 acres to more than 14 million acres. Difficult environmental and health challenges remain in many of these areas, including lack of access to safe drinking water, sanitation, adequate waste facilities, and other environmental safeguards taken for granted elsewhere.
EPA plans to provide $21.6 million to States, U.S. Territories, Tribes, and inter-tribal consortia to help them develop their information management and technology capabilities. The purpose of this support is two-fold: to assist the Agency in providing ready access to real-time environmental information and to allow States and Tribes to better integrate and share their environmental information.

Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution._EPA will continue to provide grant assistance to States, U.S. Territories, the District of Columbia, and Tribes to develop and implement authorized programs for lead paint remediation, including programs to train and certify individuals engaged in remediation activities. Another priority for 2014 will be the implementation of a new regulation to address lead-safe work practices for renovation, repair, and painting activities.
In 2014, EPA will continue the Pesticide Program Implementation State and Tribal Assistance Grants activities which cover worker protection, endangered species, coordination with States, Tribes, and other Federal agencies, certification and training of pesticide applicators, coordination with other agencies, pesticides environmental stewardship, and Integrated Pest Management (IPM). EPA will also continue the grant program for States and Tribes, to test innovative pollution prevention (P2) approaches and to provide P2 technical assistance to companies.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._To promote compliance with laws intended to protect human health and the environment, EPA will continue to award State and Tribal grants to assist in the implementation of compliance and enforcement provisions of environmental laws. EPA will provide funding to States and Tribes for compliance assurance activities including inspections and enforcement case support activities. Through grants for pesticide enforcement, EPA will support State and Tribal compliance and enforcement activities designed to protect the environment from harmful chemicals and pesticides. These grants will also help States and Tribes protect underserved and vulnerable populations by conducting compliance (inspections) and enforcement activities, including those related to worker protection standards and those at pesticide producing establishments. Toxic Substance compliance grants help protect the public and the environment from polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos, and lead-based paint. Funds are used to train inspectors, including the train-the-trainer program; provide inspection equipment including sampling and personal protective equipment; and fund travel and salary costs associated with conducting inspections. In 2014, grants to States for compliance and enforcement evaluations will allow States to test the impact of different compliance assurance approaches and enforcement tools to determine what is most effective and could be expanded or replicated.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0103–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 24 21 20
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 63 56 53
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 4,180 3,720 3,593



99.9 Total new obligations 4,268 3,798 3,667

Payment to the Hazardous Substance Superfund

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–0250–0–1–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Payment to the hazardous substance superfund 1,075 1,144 1,042



0900 Total new obligations (object class 94.0) 1,075 1,144 1,042

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 1,077 1,142 1,042
1100 Appropriation 2
1130 Appropriations permanently reduced –2



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 1,075 1,144 1,042
1930 Total budgetary resources available 1,075 1,144 1,042

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1,075 1,144 1,042
3020 Outlays (gross) –1,075 –1,144 –1,042

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 1,075 1,144 1,042
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1,075 1,144 1,042
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 1,075 1,144 1,042
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1,075 1,144 1,042

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, authorizes appropriations from the general fund to finance activities conducted through the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The Administration proposes to continue the payment from the general fund up to the appropriated amount in 2014 less sums available in the Trust Fund on September 30, 2013.

Environmental Services

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–5295–0–2–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 303 326 353
Receipts:
0260 Environmental Services 23 27 28



0400 Total: Balances and collections 326 353 381



0799 Balance, end of year 326 353 381

The Environmental Services special fund was established for the deposit of fee receipts associated with environmental programs that may, by statute, be deposited into the fund.

Pesticide Registration Fund

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–5374–0–2–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year
Receipts:
0220 Registration Service Fees, Pesticide Registration Fund 16 11 11



0400 Total: Balances and collections 16 11 11
Appropriations:
0500 Pesticide Registration Fund –16 –11 –11



0799 Balance, end of year

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–5374–0–2–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0001 Direct program activity 13 11 11

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 5 8 8
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 16 11 11



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 16 11 11
1930 Total budgetary resources available 21 19 19
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 8 8 8

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 6 5 8
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 13 11 11
3020 Outlays (gross) –14 –8 –11



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 5 8 8
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 6 5 8
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 5 8 8

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 16 11 11
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 5 8 8
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 9 3



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 14 8 11
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 16 11 11
4190 Outlays, net (total) 14 8 11

Fees deposited in this account are paid by industry for expedited processing of certain registration petitions and the associated establishment of tolerances for pesticides to be used in or on food and animal feed. These Pesticide Registration Service fees are authorized by Section 33 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as amended by Public Law 112–177, the Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act of 2012.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–5374–0–2–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 6 5 5
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 2 2 2
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 1 1 1
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 2 1 1



99.9 Total new obligations 13 11 11

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–5374–0–2–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 53 53 53

Reregistration and Expedited Processing Revolving Fund

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4310–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0801 Reregistration and expedited processing 22 28 28

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 2 2 2
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:
1800 Collected 22 28 28



1850 Spending auth from offsetting collections, mand (total) 22 28 28
1930 Total budgetary resources available 24 30 30
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 2 2 2

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1 2 2
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 22 28 28
3020 Outlays (gross) –21 –28 –28



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 2 2 2
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1 2 2
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 2 2 2

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 22 28 28
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 17 28 28
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 4



4110 Outlays, gross (total) 21 28 28
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4123 Non-Federal sources –22 –28 –28
4190 Outlays, net (total) –1

Pesticide Maintenance fees are paid by industry to offset the costs of pesticide reregistration, registration review, and reassessment of tolerances for pesticides used in or on food and animal feed as required by law. This fee is authorized in Section 4 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1972, as amended by Public Law 112–177. Authorization to collect the fee will expire on September 30, 2017.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4310–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Reimbursable obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 15 19 18
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 4 6 6
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 1 1 1
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 1 1 2



99.9 Total new obligations 22 28 28

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–4310–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 121 150 145

Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund

In addition to amounts provided under the heading "Environmental Programs and Management", $2,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2016, shall be available to carry out section 3024 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 6939g), including the development, operation, maintenance, and upgrading of the hazardous waste electronic manifest system established by such section.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4330–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 2



0900 Total new obligations (object class 25.1) 2

Budgetary Resources:
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 2



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 2
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 2
3020 Outlays (gross) –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 2
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 1
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 2
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1

This appropriation supports all activities necessary for the development of the system established by the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act (Public Law 112–195).

Working Capital Fund

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4565–0–4–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0801 ETSD Operations 194 190 190
0802 Postage 2 5 5
0803 IFMS 6 5 5
0804 eRelocation 21 25 25



0900 Total new obligations 223 225 225

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 54 46 47
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 9 1 1



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 63 47 48
Budget authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 202 210 210
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 4 15 15



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 206 225 225
1930 Total budgetary resources available 269 272 273
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 46 47 48

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 108 120 121
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 223 225 225
3020 Outlays (gross) –202 –223 –271
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –9 –1 –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 120 121 74
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –93 –97 –112
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –4 –15 –15



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –97 –112 –127
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 15 23 9
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 23 9 –53

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 206 225 225
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 111 158 158
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 91 65 113



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 202 223 271
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –198 –210 –210
4033 Non-Federal sources –4



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –202 –210 –210
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –4 –15 –15
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 13 61
4190 Outlays, net (total) 13 61

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) received authority to establish a Working Capital Fund (WCF) and was designated a pilot franchise fund under Public Law 103–356, the Government Management and Reform Act of 1994. EPA received permanent authority for the WCF in P.L. 105–65, as part of an effort to increase competition for governmental administrative services. EPA's WCF became operational in 1997 and funds seven main activities: information technology and telecommunications operations, managed by the Office of Environmental Information; Agency postage costs, managed by the Office of Administration; and the core accounting system, employee relocations, travel and conference planning, managed by the Office of the Chief Financial Officer. The 2014 amount reflects only base resources and may change during the year in accordance with programmatic needs.

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4565–0–4–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Reimbursable obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 16 15 15
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 23 25 25
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 1 1
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 2 2 2
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 6 4 4
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 23 15 15
25.3 Other goods and services from Federal sources 50 65 65
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 2 2 2
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 88 90 90
26.0 Supplies and materials 1
31.0 Equipment 11 5 5



99.9 Total new obligations 223 225 225

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–4565–0–4–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 144 137 144

Abatement, Control, and Compliance Direct Loan Financing Account

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4322–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Credit program obligations:
0716 Finance Account/Credit Reform 1



0900 Total new obligations 1

Budgetary Resources:
Financing authority:
Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:
1800 Collected 2 2
1825 Spending authority from offsetting collections applied to repay debt –2 –1



1850 Spending auth from offsetting collections, mand (total) 1
1900 Financing authority (total) 1
1930 Total budgetary resources available 1

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1
3020 Outlays (gross) –1

Financing authority and disbursements, net:
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 1
Financing disbursements:
4110 Financing disbursements, gross 1
Offsets against gross financing authority and disbursements:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4123 Non-Federal sources-Repayments of principal, net –2 –2
4180 Financing authority, net (total) –2 –1
4190 Financing disbursements, net (total) –2 –1

Status of Direct Loans (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4322–0–3–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Position with respect to appropriations act limitation on obligations:
1121 Limitation available from carry-forward
1143 Unobligated limitation carried forward



1150 Total direct loan obligations

Cumulative balance of direct loans outstanding:
1210 Outstanding, start of year 2 2 2



1290 Outstanding, end of year 2 2 2

As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, this non-budgetary account records all cash flows to and from the Government resulting from direct loans obligated in 1992 and beyond. The amounts in this account are a means of financing and are not included in the budget totals.

Balance Sheet (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–4322–0–3–304 2011 actual 2012 actual

ASSETS:
1401 Net value of assets related to post-1991 direct loans receivable: Direct loans receivable, gross 2 2


1999 Total assets 2 2
LIABILITIES:
2103 Federal liabilities: Debt 2 2


4999 Total liabilities and net position 2 2

Trust Funds

Hazardous Substance Superfund

(including transfers of funds)

For necessary expenses to carry out the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended, including sections 111(c)(3), (c)(5), (c)(6), and (e)(4) (42 U.S.C. 9611) $1,180,374,000, to remain available until expended, consisting of such sums as are available in the Trust Fund on September 30, 2013, as authorized by section 517(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and up to $1,180,374,000 as a payment from general revenues to the Hazardous Substance Superfund for purposes as authorized by section 517(b) of SARA, as amended: Provided, That funds appropriated under this heading may be allocated to other Federal agencies in accordance with section 111(a) of CERCLA: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading, $11,054,000 shall be paid to the "Office of Inspector General'' appropriation to remain available until September 30, 2015, and $23,549,000 shall be paid to the "Science and Technology'' appropriation to remain available until September 30, 2015.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution as well as amounts from P.L. 113–2, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (no language shown).

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8145–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 137 79 138
Adjustments:
0190 Adjustment - rounding issues over several years. 3



0199 Balance, start of year 140 79 138
Receipts:
0200 Excise Taxes, Hazardous Substance Superfund 803
0201 Corporation Income Taxes, Hazardous Substance Superfund 766
0202 Fines and Penalties, and Miscellaneous, Hazardous Substance Superfund 1 2 2
0220 Recoveries, Hazardous Substance Superfund 45 100 98
0240 Interest and Profits on Investments, Hazardous Substance Superfund 40 48 64
0241 Interfund Transactions, Hazardous Substance Superfund 1,075 1,142 1,042
0242 Interfund Transactions, Hazardous Substance Superfund 2



0299 Total receipts and collections 1,161 1,294 2,775



0400 Total: Balances and collections 1,301 1,373 2,913
Appropriations:
0500 Hazardous Substance Superfund –1,181 –1,188 –1,145
0501 Hazardous Substance Superfund –10 –10 –11
0502 Hazardous Substance Superfund –23 –23 –24
0503 Hazardous Substance Superfund –8 –14 –19



0599 Total appropriations –1,222 –1,235 –1,199



0799 Balance, end of year 79 138 1,714

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8145–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0011 Clean Air and Global Climate Change 3 3 3
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 1,135 1,087 1,022
0015 Compliance and Environmental Stewardship 240 224 215



0100 Subtotal direct program 1,378 1,314 1,240



0799 Total direct obligations 1,378 1,314 1,240
0801 Reimbursable program 369 306 255



0900 Total new obligations 1,747 1,620 1,495

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 2,034 1,876 2,299
1001 Discretionary unobligated balance brought fwd, Oct 1 49 45
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 166 200 200



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 2,200 2,076 2,499
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1100 Appropriation 2
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 1,181 1,188 1,145
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) IG Transfer 10 10 11
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) S&T Transfer 23 23 24
1120 Appropriations transferred to other accts [68–8221] –5
1131 Unobligated balance of appropriations permanently reduced –5 –5



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 1,204 1,218 1,180
Appropriations, mandatory:
1201 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 8 14 19



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 8 14 19
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 98 386 255
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources 4
1711 Spending authority from offsetting collections transferred from other accounts [68–8221] 5



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 102 391 255
Spending authority from offsetting collections, mandatory:
1800 Collected 220 220 220
1801 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –111



1850 Spending auth from offsetting collections, mand (total) 109 220 220
1900 Budget authority (total) 1,423 1,843 1,674
1930 Total budgetary resources available 3,623 3,919 4,173
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 1,876 2,299 2,678
Special and non-revolving trust funds:
1952 Expired unobligated balance, start of year 2 4 4
1953 Expired unobligated balance, end of year 4 4 4

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 1,570 1,401 1,009
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 1,747 1,620 1,495
3011 Obligations incurred, expired accounts 21
3020 Outlays (gross) –1,768 –1,812 –1,617
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –166 –200 –200
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –3



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 1,401 1,009 687
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –122 –15 –15
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 107



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –15 –15 –15
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 1,448 1,386 994
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 1,386 994 672

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 1,306 1,609 1,435
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 619 757 683
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 854 911 789



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 1,473 1,668 1,472
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Offsetting collections, Federal Sources [Federal Sources] –11 –10 –10
4033 Baseline Program [Non-Federal Sources] –107 –376 –245



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –118 –386 –255
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired –4
4052 Offsetting collections credited to expired accounts 20



4060 Additional offsets against budget authority only (total) 16



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 1,204 1,223 1,180
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 1,355 1,282 1,217
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 117 234 239
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 6 5 5
4101 Outlays from mandatory balances 289 139 140



4110 Outlays, gross (total) 295 144 145
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4120 Federal sources –23 –23 –23
4123 Non-Federal sources –197 –197 –197



4130 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –220 –220 –220
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4140 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 111



4160 Budget authority, net (mandatory) 8 14 19
4170 Outlays, net (mandatory) 75 –76 –75
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 1,212 1,237 1,199
4190 Outlays, net (total) 1,430 1,206 1,142

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
5000 Total investments, SOY: Federal securities: Par value 3,509 3,250 3,789
5001 Total investments, EOY: Federal securities: Par value 3,250 3,789 3,495

This appropriation provides funds for the implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) including activities under the Working Capital Fund. This appropriation supports core Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs in four of EPA's five goals. Specifically in 2014, emphasis will be placed on the following:

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._To preserve and restore land and to protect human health and the environment, EPA will reduce the risks posed by releases of harmful substances and protect against exposure to those substances by cleaning up and restoring contaminated sites to beneficial use. EPA will apply the most effective methods to control the risks associated with the presence of harmful substances, improve response capabilities, and maximize the effectiveness of response and clean-up actions. EPA's clean-up and response activity at contaminated sites will address environmental concerns, such as the removal of contaminated soil and treatment of contaminated groundwater, in order to reduce human exposures to hazardous pollutants and provide long-term human health protection. EPA will ensure that all releases of harmful substances to the environment are appropriately addressed by responding to incidents and providing technical support. To effectively prepare for and respond to incidents of national significance, EPA will improve decontamination readiness, continue to support a nationwide environmental laboratory network, and maintain a highly skilled, trained, and equipped response workforce. EPA will conduct research to improve methods and models and provide technical support to accelerate scientifically defensible and cost-effective decisions for clean-up at complex contaminated sites in accordance with CERCLA. EPA will also work to maximize responsible parties' participation in site clean-ups and pursue greater recovery of EPA's clean-up costs.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._EPA's Superfund Enforcement program protects communities by requiring responsible parties to pay for and/or conduct clean-ups. The program uses an enforcement first approach that maximizes the participation of liable and viable parties in performing and paying for clean-ups in both the remedial and removal programs. To further carry out the responsibilities of CERCLA, EPA will allocate funds from its appropriation to Federal agency partners including to the Department of Justice (DOJ). DOJ supports EPA's Superfund Enforcement program through negotiations and judicial actions to compel Potentially Responsible Parties to clean up and through litigation to recover Trust Fund monies. EPA will investigate and refer for prosecution criminal and civil violations of CERCLA.

Enabling and Support Programs (ESP)._ESPs provide centralized management services and support to the Agency's various environmental programs. The offices and the functions they perform within the Superfund appropriation are: the Offices of Administration and Resources Management (facilities infrastructure and operations, acquisition management, human resources management services, and management of financial assistance grants/institutional assistance grants); Environmental Information (exchange network, information security, information technology/data management); the Chief Financial Officer (strategic planning, annual planning and budgeting, financial services, financial management, analysis, and accountability), and General Counsel (alternative dispute resolution, legal advice). Because these centralized services provide support across EPA, resources for the ESPs are allocated across EPA's appropriations, goals, and objectives.

Status of Funds (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8145–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Unexpended balance, start of year:
0100 Balance, start of year 3,624 3,345 3,433



0199 Total balance, start of year 3,624 3,345 3,433
Cash income during the year:
Current law:
Receipts:
1202 Fines and Penalties, and Miscellaneous, Hazardous Substance Superfund 1 2 2
Offsetting receipts (proprietary):
1220 Recoveries, Hazardous Substance Superfund 45 100 98
Offsetting receipts (intragovernmental):
1240 Interest and Profits on Investments, Hazardous Substance Superfund 40 48 64
1241 Interfund Transactions, Hazardous Substance Superfund 1,075 1,142 1,042
1242 Interfund Transactions, Hazardous Substance Superfund 2
Offsetting collections:
1280 Hazardous Substance Superfund 11 10 10
1281 Hazardous Substance Superfund 23 23 23
1282 Hazardous Substance Superfund 197 197 197
1283 Hazardous Substance Superfund 107 376 245
1299 Income under present law 1,499 1,900 1,681
Proposed legislation:
Receipts:
2200 Excise Taxes, Hazardous Substance Superfund 803
2201 Corporation Income Taxes, Hazardous Substance Superfund 766
2299 Income under proposed legislation 1,569



3299 Total cash income 1,499 1,900 3,250
Cash outgo during year:
Current law:
4500 Hazardous Substance Superfund –1,768 –1,812 –1,617
4599 Outgo under current law (-) –1,768 –1,812 –1,617



6599 Total cash outgo (-) –1,768 –1,812 –1,617
7625 Hazardous Substance Superfund –5 –5
7645 Hazardous Substance Superfund –5
7645 Hazardous Substance Superfund 5



7699 Total adjustments –10
Unexpended balance, end of year:
8700 Uninvested balance (net), end of year 95 –356 1,571
8701 Hazardous Substance Superfund 3,250 3,789 3,495



8799 Total balance, end of year 3,345 3,433 5,066

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8145–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent 284 271 261
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 8 8 7
11.5 Other personnel compensation 6 6 6
11.7 Military personnel 2 2 2



11.9 Total personnel compensation 300 287 276
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 89 85 82
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 9 9 8
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 43 41 41
23.2 Rental payments to others 1 1 1
23.3 Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges 4 4 4
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 35 33 32
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 612 586 536
25.3 Other goods and services (Recovery Act) 175 167 161
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 9 9 8
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 9 9 8
26.0 Supplies and materials 4 4 4
31.0 Equipment 9 9 8
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 47 45 43
42.0 Insurance claims and indemnities 3



99.0 Direct obligations 1,346 1,289 1,215
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 369 306 255
Allocation Account - direct:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 6 5 5
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 26 20 20



99.0 Allocation account - direct 32 25 25



99.9 Total new obligations 1,747 1,620 1,495

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–8145–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 2,899 2,918 2,840
1101 Direct military average strength employment 12 12 12
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 131 51 23

Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

For necessary expenses to carry out leaking underground storage tank cleanup activities authorized by subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended, $99,242,000, to remain available until expended, of which $70,316,000 shall be for carrying out leaking underground storage tank cleanup activities authorized by section 9003(h) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended; $28,926,000 shall be for carrying out the other provisions of the Solid Waste Disposal Act specified in section 9508(c) of the Internal Revenue Code, as amended: Provided, That the Administrator is authorized to use appropriations made available under this heading to implement section 9013 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act to provide financial assistance to federally recognized Indian tribes for the development and implementation of programs to manage underground storage tanks.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution as well as amounts from P.L. 113–2, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (no language shown).

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8153–0–7–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

0100 Balance, start of year 3,333 1,157 1,248
Receipts:
0200 Transfer from the General Fund Amounts Equivalent to Taxes, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 170 181 180
0240 Earnings on Investments, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 158 20 27



0299 Total receipts and collections 328 201 207



0400 Total: Balances and collections 3,661 1,358 1,455
Appropriations:
0500 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund –104 –105 –99
0501 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund –5
0502 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund –2,400



0599 Total appropriations –2,504 –110 –99



0799 Balance, end of year 1,157 1,248 1,356

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8153–0–7–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0013 Land Preservation and Restoration 2,508 106 108

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 4 4 11
1001 Discretionary unobligated balance brought fwd, Oct 1 4
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 4 3 3



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 8 7 14
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 104 105 99
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 5



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 104 110 99
Appropriations, mandatory:
1201 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 2,400



1260 Appropriations, mandatory (total) 2,400
1900 Budget authority (total) 2,504 110 99
1930 Total budgetary resources available 2,512 117 113
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 4 11 5
Special and non-revolving trust funds:
1952 Expired unobligated balance, start of year 3 4 4
1953 Expired unobligated balance, end of year 4 4 4

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 168 127 119
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 2,508 106 108
3020 Outlays (gross) –2,544 –111 –103
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –4 –3 –3
3041 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, expired –1



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 127 119 121
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year 168 127 119
3200 Obligated balance, end of year 127 119 121

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 104 110 99
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 20 23 22
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 124 88 81



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 144 111 103
Mandatory:
4090 Budget authority, gross 2,400
Outlays, gross:
4100 Outlays from new mandatory authority 2,400
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 2,504 110 99
4190 Outlays, net (total) 2,544 111 103

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
5000 Total investments, SOY: Federal securities: Par value 3,450 1,259 1,335
5001 Total investments, EOY: Federal securities: Par value 1,259 1,335 1,415

The Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund, authorized by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, as amended by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997, and the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, and the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21, Public Law 112–141) provides funds for preventing and responding to releases from underground storage tanks, including activities under the Working Capital Fund. The Trust Fund is financed by a 0.1 cent per gallon tax on motor fuels through September 30, 2016.

LUST funds are allocated to States through cooperative agreements to clean up sites posing the greatest threat to human health and the environment as authorized under Section 9003(h) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act of 1965, as amended, and also to implement the activities authorized by Title XV, Subtitle B of EPAct. Funds are also used for grants to non-State entities under Section 8001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended. Federally recognized Tribes receive grant funding under P.L. 105–276. EPA supports oversight, clean-up, and enforcement programs which are implemented by the States. LUST Trust Fund dollars can be used for State-led clean-ups and for State oversight of responsible party clean-ups. In addition, EPAct expanded the authorized activities for the underground storage tank program. This appropriation supports core Agency programs and two of EPA's five goals. Specifically in 2014, emphasis will be placed on the following:

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._The LUST program promotes rapid and effective responses to releases from Federally regulated underground storage tanks containing petroleum by enhancing State, local, and Tribal enforcement and response capability. EPA's LUST program priorities include: increasing the efficiency of LUST clean-ups; addressing contaminants of concern; and promoting the continued use, reuse, and long-term management of LUST sites. EPA will help States and Tribes improve LUST clean-up performance by performing analyses and developing strategies to reduce the backlog of open releases, continuing to develop and promote the use of innovative tools such as multi-site and geographical clean-up approaches, providing guidance and technical support regarding clean -up approaches and technologies, and streamlining clean-up decisions and processes. EPA will also continue efforts to monitor the soundness of State clean-up funds. EPA's release prevention program priorities will assist States and Tribes to ensure continued compliance with the three year inspection requirement, implement the various release prevention provisions of EPAct such as operator training and delivery prohibition, enforce violations discovered during the inspections, and continue building tribal implementation capacity.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._To protect the Nation's groundwater and drinking water from petroleum releases from Underground Storage Tanks (UST), this program provides compliance assistance tools, technical assistance and training to promote and enforce UST systems compliance and clean-ups.

Enabling and Support Programs._Enabling and Support Programs provide the infrastructure of people, facilities, and systems necessary to operate the programs funded by the LUST appropriation. The offices and the functions they perform are: Administration and Resources Management (facilities infrastructure and operations, acquisition management, and human resources management services); Environmental Information (information technology/data management); and the Chief Financial Officer (strategic planning, annual planning and budgeting, financial services, financial management, analysis, and accountability).

Status of Funds (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8153–0–7–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Unexpended balance, start of year:
0100 Balance, start of year 3,508 1,292 1,382



0199 Total balance, start of year 3,508 1,292 1,382
Cash income during the year:
Current law:
Receipts:
1200 Transfer from the General Fund Amounts Equivalent to Taxes, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 170 181 180
Offsetting receipts (intragovernmental):
1240 Earnings on Investments, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 158 20 27
1299 Income under present law 328 201 207



3299 Total cash income 328 201 207
Cash outgo during year:
Current law:
4500 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund –2,544 –111 –103
4599 Outgo under current law (-) –2,544 –111 –103



6599 Total cash outgo (-) –2,544 –111 –103
Unexpended balance, end of year:
8700 Uninvested balance (net), end of year 33 47 71
8701 Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 1,259 1,335 1,415



8799 Total balance, end of year 1,292 1,382 1,486

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8153–0–7–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 7 7 7
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 2 2 2
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1 1 1
25.1 Advisory and assistance services 3 1 2
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 2 2 2
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 93 93 94
94.0 Financial transfers 2,400



99.9 Total new obligations 2,508 106 108

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–8153–0–7–999 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 66 70 63

Inland Oil Spill Programs

For expenses necessary to carry out the Environmental Protection Agency's responsibilities under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, $21,268,000, to be derived from the Oil Spill Liability trust fund, to remain available until expended.

Note.—A full-year 2013 appropriation for this account was not enacted at the time the budget was prepared; therefore, the budget assumes this account is operating under the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2013 (P.L. 112–175). The amounts included for 2013 reflect the annualized level provided by the continuing resolution.

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8221–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Obligations by program activity:
0013 Land preservation and restoration 20 18 22



0100 Direct Program 20 18 22
0801 Reimbursable program 31 31 31



0900 Total new obligations 51 49 53

Budgetary Resources:
Unobligated balance:
1000 Unobligated balance brought forward, Oct 1 23 29 26
1021 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations 8 2 2



1050 Unobligated balance (total) 31 31 28
Budget authority:
Appropriations, discretionary:
1101 Appropriation (special or trust fund) 18 18 21
1121 Appropriations transferred from other accts [68–8145] 5



1160 Appropriation, discretionary (total) 23 18 21
Spending authority from offsetting collections, discretionary:
1700 Collected 33 31 31
1701 Change in uncollected payments, Federal sources –7
1710 Spending authority from offsetting collections transferred to other accounts [68–8145] –5



1750 Spending auth from offsetting collections, disc (total) 26 26 31
1900 Budget authority (total) 49 44 52
1930 Total budgetary resources available 80 75 80
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
1941 Unexpired unobligated balance, end of year 29 26 27

Change in obligated balance:
Unpaid obligations:
3000 Unpaid obligations, brought forward, Oct 1 36 23 25
3010 Obligations incurred, unexpired accounts 51 49 53
3020 Outlays (gross) –56 –45 –53
3040 Recoveries of prior year unpaid obligations, unexpired –8 –2 –2



3050 Unpaid obligations, end of year 23 25 23
Uncollected payments:
3060 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, brought forward, Oct 1 –55 –48 –48
3070 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 7



3090 Uncollected pymts, Fed sources, end of year –48 –48 –48
Memorandum (non-add) entries:
3100 Obligated balance, start of year –19 –25 –23
3200 Obligated balance, end of year –25 –23 –25

Budget authority and outlays, net:
Discretionary:
4000 Budget authority, gross 49 44 52
Outlays, gross:
4010 Outlays from new discretionary authority 29 36 41
4011 Outlays from discretionary balances 27 9 12



4020 Outlays, gross (total) 56 45 53
Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (collected) from:
4030 Federal sources –31 –31 –31
4033 Non-Federal sources –2



4040 Offsets against gross budget authority and outlays (total) –33 –31 –31
Additional offsets against gross budget authority only:
4050 Change in uncollected pymts, Fed sources, unexpired 7



4070 Budget authority, net (discretionary) 23 13 21
4080 Outlays, net (discretionary) 23 14 22
4180 Budget authority, net (total) 23 13 21
4190 Outlays, net (total) 23 14 22

This appropriation provides for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) responsibilities for prevention, preparedness, response, and enforcement activities authorized under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA), including activities under the Working Capital Fund. This appropriation supports core Agency programs and two of the Agency's five goals. Specifically in 2014, emphasis will be placed on the following:

Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development._The Oil Spill program protects U.S. waters by preventing, preparing for, responding to, and monitoring oil spills. Under the regulatory framework established by the Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) and Federal Response Plan (FRP) regulations, EPA conducts oil spill prevention, preparedness, inspection, and enforcement activities associated with more than 600,000 non-transportation-related oil storage facilities. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) then establishes EPA's jurisdiction over inland oil spills and sets forth the framework for response. EPA accesses the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, administered by the U.S. Coast Guard, to obtain reimbursement for site-specific spill response activities. More than 30,000 oil and hazardous substance releases occur in the United States every year, with a significant portion of these spills occurring in the inland zone over which EPA has jurisdiction.
EPA develops and manages the regulations and protocols under Subpart J of the NCP which require manufacturers of various oil spill response products to test their products prior to listing on a Product Schedule. The Product Schedule identifies those oil spill remediation agents, such as dispersants and surface washing agents, which could be authorized for use by an On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) on an oil spill. Product testing ensures their effectiveness and provides toxicity information used by OSCs and Regional Response Teams in making informed decisions regarding the use of certain products in response to specific spills. EPA will be focusing its oil spill research efforts on ecological effects and assessment of shoreline and coastal impacts from oil spills and use of dispersants and other chemical agents, human health impacts, and spill remediation alternatives and innovative technology development and evaluation, including green technologies. Spill response is a priority for the Agency, and EPA has been instrumental in providing guidance for various response technologies. A key factor in providing guidance on spill response technologies is developing a firm understanding of the science behind spill behavior in the environment.

Enforcing Environmental Laws._The Inland Oil Spill Programs appropriation portion of the Civil Enforcement program is designed to prevent oil spills using civil enforcement and compliance assistance approaches, as well as to prepare for and respond to any oil spills affecting the inland waters of the United States. Pursuant to Clean Water Act Section 311 (Oil Spill and Hazardous Substances Liability) requirements, EPA's Civil Enforcement program develops policies; issues administrative clean-up and removal orders and orders protecting public health; pursues administrative remedies and/or refers civil judicial actions to the Department of Justice; assesses civil penalties for spills into the environment or violations of administrative orders or oil pollution prevention regulations; assists regulated entities in understanding their legal requirements under the Clean Water Act; and assists in the recovery of clean-up costs expended by the government.

Enabling and Support Programs._Enabling and Support Programs provide the infrastructure of people, facilities and systems necessary to operate the programs funded by the Inland Oil Spill Programs appropriation. The office and function performed is Administration and Resources Management (facilities infrastructure and operations).

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)


Identification code 68–8221–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Direct obligations:
11.1 Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent 10 10 12
12.1 Civilian personnel benefits 4 4 5
25.2 Other services from non-Federal sources 4 3 3
25.5 Research and development contracts 1 1 1
41.0 Grants, subsidies, and contributions 1 1



99.0 Direct obligations 20 18 22
99.0 Reimbursable obligations 31 31 31



99.9 Total new obligations 51 49 53

Employment Summary


Identification code 68–8221–0–7–304 2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

1001 Direct civilian full-time equivalent employment 94 101 113
2001 Reimbursable civilian full-time equivalent employment 9

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

Administrative Provisions—Environmental Protection Agency

(including transfer of funds)

For fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement directly Federal environmental programs required or authorized by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may award cooperative agreements to federally recognized Indian tribes or Intertribal consortia, if authorized by their member tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal environmental programs for Indian tribes required or authorized by law, except that no such cooperative agreements may be awarded from funds designated for State financial assistance agreements.

The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is authorized to collect and obligate pesticide registration service fees in accordance with section 33 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as amended by Public Law 112–177, the Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act of 2012.

The Administrator is authorized to transfer up to $300,000,000 of the funds appropriated for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative under the heading "Environmental Programs and Management'' to the head of any Federal department or agency, with the concurrence of such head, to carry out activities that would support the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement programs, projects, or activities; to enter into an interagency agreement with the head of such Federal department or agency to carry out these activities; and to make grants to governmental entities, nonprofit organizations, institutions, and individuals for planning, research, monitoring, outreach, and implementation in furtherance of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Under terms established by the Administrator, and in addition to funds otherwise available in other appropriation accounts for specific grant programs, the Agency may expend funds appropriated in the Environmental Program and Management account for competitive grants to communities to implement Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) projects.

The Science and Technology, Environmental Programs and Management, Office of Inspector General, Hazardous Substance Superfund, and Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program Accounts, are available for the construction, alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities provided that the cost does not exceed $150,000 per project.

The fourth paragraph under the heading Administrative Provisions of title II of Public Law 109–54, as amended by the fifth paragraph under such heading of title II of division E of Public Law 111–8 and the third paragraph under such heading of the title II of Public Law 111–88, is further amended by striking "up to thirty persons at any one time" and inserting "persons".

For fiscal year 2014, and notwithstanding section 518(f) of the Water Pollution Control Act, the Administrator is authorized to use the amounts appropriated for any fiscal year under Section 319 of the Act to make grants to federally recognized Indian tribes pursuant to sections 319(h) and 518(e) of that Act.

GENERAL FUND RECEIPT ACCOUNTS

(in millions of dollars)


2012 actual 2013 CR 2014 est.

Governmental receipts:
68–089500 Registration, PMN, Other Services 1 2 2
General Fund Governmental receipts 1 2 2

Offsetting receipts from the public:
68–322000 All Other General Fund Proprietary Receipts Including Budget Clearing Accounts 2 2
68–322900 Cellulosic Biofuel Waiver Credits, Renewal Fuel Program 5 10 10



General Fund Offsetting receipts from the public 5 12 12