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West Wing Reads for 10/13/17

Summary: 
Each day we round up the best stories the West Wing is reading and share them with you.

West Wing Reads

“TRUMP AND IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL: SMART CHESS PLAY COULD MOTIVATE THE MULLAHS”

- James S. Robbins, USA Today

Columnist James Robbins writes in USA Today that President Trump’s decision to not certify Iran’s compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) nuclear deal “simply acknowledges reality.” Robbins states the deal was “erected on a foundation of sand,” and the decision to decertify it “was a smart chess move.” Robbins called the decision “prudent” as Congress now has the opportunity to “initiate legislation that would reimpose sanctions on an expedited schedule, if it so chooses.”
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In The Federalist, David Harsanyi writes it's “about time” President Trump ended Obamacare’s illegal insurance company subsidies, and notes “the price of insurance for Obamacare consumers will not change because of the president’s actions. Trump is stopping illegal payments to health insurance companies, not altering a word of Obamacare.”

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In The Hill, Chris Pope writes on President Trump’s health care executive order which will broaden the availability of affordable health care options due to a set of regulatory reforms. Pope states, “efforts by the administration to improve the choices of those unable to afford care deserve widespread support.”

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In The Washington Post, chairman, president, and chief executive of Lockheed Martin Corp, Marillyn Hewson remarks she is excited by the reestablishment of the National Space Council as “Space exploration serves to stimulate the imagination in a way nothing else can,” and will “enact the reforms necessary to strengthen American leadership in space.”

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And in good economic news, Michael Sheetz of CNBC reports “consumer confidence crushed expectations in October,” reaching “its highest level since the start of 2004.” October’s numbers reflect “an unmistakable sense among consumers that economic prospects are now about as good as could be expected,” Sheetz writes.