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The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release

President Obama Names Stephanie Cutter Assistant to the President for Special Projects

Washington -- President Obama today named Stephanie Cutter to the position of Assistant to the President for Special Projects. In this role Cutter will advise on key presidential initiatives, including the communications and outreach strategy for the implementation of the landmark health insurance reform legislation. She will begin work on May 1, 2010.
“Stephanie is one of the most respected professionals in public affairs and has an innate understanding of the nexus between policy and communications. She’s also a veteran of the White House, and I’m thrilled to have her on board in this new role,” said President Obama.
Stephanie Cutter has spent two decades in public service, serving most recently as an advisor to the First Lady in the development and launch of the First Lady’s Let’s Move initiative.  She also recently served as Adviser to the President in overseeing the political and communications strategy around the successful nomination of Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. From January to May 2009, Cutter served as Counselor to the Treasury Secretary, helping to guide the strategy behind the development and implementation of the Administration’s Financial Stability Plan.
Prior to serving in the Administration, Cutter was the Chief Spokesperson for the Obama-Biden Transition, and was Michelle Obama’s Chief of Staff during the presidential campaign.
Stephanie Cutter is also the founder of the The Cutter Media Group, LLC, a strategic communications firm, and served as a senior strategist for Majority Leader Harry Reid, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, and Senator John Kerry.  She held several positions in the Clinton Administration, including Deputy Communications Director for the White House.
A graduate of Smith College and the Georgetown University Law Center, Cutter has also served as a lecturer at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.