New Energy.gov Video Series Highlights Women in STEM Fields

Ed. note: This is cross-posted from the U.S. Department of Energy. You can see the original post here.

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Meet Carter Wall. She's the director of the performance solar division at a Boston-area electrical construction company and the first profile in our new #WomeninSTEM video series.

Carter developed an interest in science at an early age, yet struggled to find examples of women scientists and engineers beyond historical figures, like Marie Curie. A lack of relatable role models ultimately didn’t stop Carter from pursuing an undergraduate education and career rooted in STEM -- shorthand for science, technology, engineering and mathematic fields. Now, she plays a key role at one of largest solar developers in the Northeast, while also serving as an ambassador for the Energy Department’s Women in Clean Energy Initiative.

Just like Carter, many women have difficultly finding STEM role models they can directly relate to, partly due to the underrepresentation of women in these fields. Among college grads, men outnumber women in nearly every science and engineering major, according to a report by the American Association of University Women. The disparity is equally as stark as women enter the workforce. According to the Department of Commerce, women make up less than a quarter of STEM professionals in the U.S.

At the Energy Department, a workforce well versed in STEM fields, like physics, chemical science and computing, is critical to driving our mission forward. That’s why we’re committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy. Through scholarships, fellowships and targeted initiatives, we’re working every day to boost the participation of underrepresented groups in STEM and energy fields -- including the launch of #WomeninSTEM. This new video series is designed to inspire the next generation of STEM professionals, while raising the profile of women who are leading transformative change across the energy sector, from addressing the growing threat of climate change to advancing clean energy technologies, like wind and solar.

Watch the video above to learn more about Carter’s story. Share your feedback and suggest profiles and STEM professions to focus on for future videos on social media using #WomenInSTEM or by sending an email to newmedia@hq.doe.gov.

Erin R. Pierce is the Digital Communications Specialist in the Office of Public Affairs. Matty Greene is a videographer for the Department of Energy.
Related Topics: Energy and Environment, Women
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