Blog Posts Related to the LGBT Community

  • Announcing the LGBT Pride Month Champions of Change Video Challenge

    Across the country, ordinary people are doing extraordinary things to improve the lives of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.  They are parents and students, neighborhood and business leaders, artists and advocates, all united in the fight for equality.

    We know that the American people are the source of some of the best ideas and most innovative solutions.  That’s why the White House Champions of Change series spotlights everyday heroes who are demonstrating commitment to improving their own communities, their country, or the lives of their fellow citizens.  And in that spirit, we are launching the LGBT Pride Month Champions of Change Video Challenge to explore the stories of unsung heroes and local leaders who are leading our march towards a more perfect union.

    If that sounds like you or someone you know, then we want to hear from you – and we want to see you in action!

  • Customs and Border Protection Proposes Expansion of Joint Customs Declarations

    E.d. Note: This blog was cross-posted from the Department of Homeland Security site.

    Today, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) proposed a revision to its customs declaration regulations that will save returning U.S. travelers time and save the agency money while still maintaining security at our ports of entry.

  • On the Road in Albuquerque: Promoting Healthy Aging

    Our country is entering a new era; each day 9,000 people celebrate their 65th birthday in the United States. As our population ages and becomes more diverse, health, community, and long-term care providers will be called upon to serve older adults in a way that is respectful and culturally appropriate.

    Communities are confronting this challenge head-on, coming together, determined to provide our nation’s older adults the resources they need to age gracefully in their homes and communities.

    I witnessed this collaboration last week in Albuquerque, New Mexico, when I was invited to participate in a community forum hosted by Equality New Mexico and the Senior Citizens Law Office. We discussed the unique barriers lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults encounter in gaining access to housing, health care, long-term care and other needed services.

     The President's health care law gives hard working, middle-class families the security they deserve.  The Affordable Care Act forces insurance companies to play by the rules, prohibiting them from dropping your coverage if you get sick, billing you into bankruptcy through annual or lifetime limits, and, soon, discriminating against anyone with a pre-existing condition.  

  • On the Road in Arlington, Texas: Focus on Safe Schools & Communities

    “No on in America should ever be afraid to walk down the street holding the hands of the person they love… no one in America should be forced to look over their shoulder because of who they are.”
                – President Barack Obama, October 28, 2009

    Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have taken significant steps to ensure the safety and security of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, including signing the Matthew Shepard & James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act and hosting the White House Conference on Bullying Prevention

    Last week, the White House partnered with the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education and The University of Texas at Arlington to host the White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools & Communities to continue this important work.  Over 400 students, teachers, parents, community advocates, law enforcement officers, and elected officials joined senior leaders of the Obama Administration for a day-long conversation about safety and security for LGBT people.

  • Standing Up for Safe Schools & Communities

    Earlier today, Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to the President, joined Attorney General Eric Holder in Arlington, Texas to deliver keynote remarks at the White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools & Communities.  In speaking before an audience of over 400 teachers, students, parents, community advocates, law enforcement officers and officials, and elected officials, Valerie described the many important steps the Obama Administration has taken to ensure safety and security for all our young people – including LGBT students – in our schools and neighborhoods.

    Valerie Jarrett at the White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools and Communities

    Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama, delivers keynote remarks at the White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools and Communities at The University of Texas at Arlington, Tuesday, March 20th, 2012. (Photo courtesy of The University of Texas at Arlington).

  • WATCH LIVE: White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools & Communities

    Today, hundreds of teachers, students, school administrators, law enforcement officers and officials, elected officials, and interested members of the public will join Obama Administration officials in Arlington, Texas for an important conversation on ensuring safe schools and communities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people across the country.

    The White House LGBT Conference on Safe Schools & Communities is hosted by the White House Office of Public Engagement in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Department of Education, and The University of Texas at Arlington. This event is the third in a series of White House LGBT Conferences that are being held across the country to empower grassroots leaders, community organizers, advocates, and interested citizens by connecting them with Federal government information, resources, and opportunities.

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    The following portions of the Conference will be live streamed here:

    9:30 – 9:45 AM EST               Opening Plenary
    9:45 – 10:45 AM EST             Panel on Safe Communities
    10:45 – 11:45 AM EST           Panel on Safe Schools
    Noon – 1:00 PM EST             Keynote remarks by White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett and Attorney General Eric Holder
    5:30 – 6:00 PM EST               Closing address by Judy Shepard, mother of the late Matthew Shepard and co-founder of the Matthew Shepard Foundation.

    Gautam Raghavan is the Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement

  • On the Road in Detroit: Focus on Housing & Homelessness

    Across the country, organizations and individuals are doing important work to address the housing needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people and prevent homelessness among members of the LGBT community.  Earlier this month, hundreds of advocates, community organizers, and interested members of the public came together in Detroit, Michigan for the White House LGBT Conference on Housing & Homelessness to participate in an important dialogue with the Obama Administration on these issues.  The Conference was hosted by the White House Office of Public Engagement in partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) and the Ruth Ellis Center, a Detroit-based center for runaway and homeless LGBT youth.

  • U.S. Departments of Justice and Education Resolve Harassment Allegations in Anoka-Hennepin School District

    Education is the great equalizer. Yet students cannot learn if they are afraid to go to school.  Students cannot learn if they are being harassed and threatened.  Students cannot learn if they feel that school administrators don’t and won’t protect them. 

    In the Anoka-Hennepin School District in Minnesota, the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education investigated whether the learning environment in the schools was unsafe and unwelcoming for students who did not conform to gender stereotypes, including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students.  Some students were afraid to go to school because they were repeatedly harassed.  Some students faced threats, physical violence, derogatory language, and other forms of harassment on a daily basis.  As a result, some students stopped attending school for periods of time, dropped out, and even contemplated or attempted suicide.