the WHITE HOUSEPresident Barack Obama

Search form

The School Districts You Don't See on This Map Are as Telling as the Ones You Do See:

Summary: 
We have more work to do so every child has access to a great public education, but Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives are advancing legislation (H.R. 5) that would cement recent education cuts, taking funding from the schools that need it most and giving it to some of the nation’s wealthiest districts.

Right now, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives are advancing legislation (H.R. 5) that would cement recent education cuts — taking funding from the schools that need it most and giving it to some of the nation's wealthiest districts.

This approach is backwards, and our teachers and kids deserve better.

Today, the President's Domestic Policy Council released a report breaking down the harmful effects of that legislation, and underlining the fundamental importance of dedicated funding for low-income students. You can read that report here.

Here are the top 100 school districts that would see their funding cut:

And keep in mind what that funding could have gone toward: Hiring teachers, school nurses, counselors, or reading specialists. It could help pay for books and supplies — perhaps for a new curriculum. See what passage of the harmful cuts in H.R. 5 could mean to a district near you.


Meanwhile, take a look at a few of the districts that would stand to gain:

Loudon County Public Schools (Loudon County, VA) would see a funding increase of more than $1.7 million. Fewer than 4% of families there live below the poverty line.

Meanwhile, Richmond City Public Schools would see their funding cut by more than $5 million. More than 35% of families there are living in poverty.


Capistrano Unified School District (Orange County, CA) would receive more than $1.1 million in additional funds. Fewer than 9% of families there live below the poverty line.

Meanwhile, the Fresno Unified School District would see their funding cut by more than $4 million. More than 46% of families there live in poverty.


The Plano Independent School District (Plano, TX) would see their funding increase by more than $1.3 million. Fewer than 10% of families there live below the poverty line.

And yet, the Dallas Independent School District would lose more than $13 million in funding. More than 36% of families there are living in poverty.


If you think this is wrong, you're in good company.
Now, pass this on.


Want to dig deeper?